Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Wikileaks
. . . .

Wikileaks

Anne Stanton - December 27th, 2010
WikiLeaks: ‘It’s too much power for one person,’ says retired diplomat
Last week, the Express reprinted a Michael Moore editorial on
WikiLeaks, “Leaks Don’t Kill People, Secrets Do.” Here is another
viewpoint from Jack Segal, a retired State Department diplomat.

By Anne Stanton

Most Americans who have heard reports of WikiLeaks believe the release
of thousands of secret State Department communications will do more
harm to this country than good, according to a Pew Research Center
survey released on December 10.
Jack Segal, a retired State Department diplomat now living in Traverse
City, happens to agree with them. But don’t be mistaken. Segal is a
staunch First Amendment advocate and is writing an insider book about
Afghanistan diplomacy and why we need to end our costly mission there
(See his accompanying essay).
Segal believes that with free speech comes responsibility, such as
checking out whether something happens to be true or putting a news
event into context. The New York Times, which is publishing a series
of news articles based on the Wikileaks documents, is doing just that.
One NYT article for example, reported on how the U.S. in 2007 tried to
pressure Germany from issuing arrest warrants for 13 CIA officers for
allegedly kidnapping an innocent German man and then torturing him in
Afghanistan before realizing they had the wrong guy. A diplomatic
cable, quoted in the December 9, 2010 article, delivered a veiled
threat that Germany must weigh its relationship with the United States
as it proceeds with the investigation.
That kind of journalism contrasts to “dumping” 251,287 documents and
hoping that the value of “transparency” trumps any downsides.  For
example, the first two leaks—The Iraq War Logs and The Afghan War
Diaries—contained names of confidential sources living in Pakistan,
Afghanistan, and Iraq, who may have
been killed for talking to Americans, Segal said.
“If you were working for one of the power brokers in Afghanistan and
it was discovered you talked to someone and you were named  in a
cable, you might end up dead. That’s very dangerous, and that’s a huge
irresponsibility. They could have scratched out the names, but it
would have taken a lot of work. It was simply laziness on their part.
Who wants to take the time and read all that stuff? It was easier to
dump it out there. But it means people will be killed, or already have
been killed. We don’t know.”
The first two batches of releases included raw communications from
junior level personnel, some of it reliable, much of it not. “This was
un-assessed intelligence, bits and pieces from Afghanistan. They were
not embassy cables—mostly they were raw defense intelligence agency
reports. These always carry a written caution—that the contents have
not been assessed at the proper level and might be completely wrong.
They are sometimes written by a young officer, for example,who does
not understand all the nuances of what’s happening. You read them at
your peril. When I worked at the White House, I never read them. They
were too raw and often wrong.”
Yet the release of this intelligence has raised an important question:
Are they vital for protecting national security, such as the 9/11
terrorist attack? Segal said it’s dubious.
“There are just thousands and thousands of reports like these. The
Pentagon will be blown up tomorrow, there’s a bomb under the White
House, dirty nukes in St. Louis. This is raw intelligence, and you
need to analyze the source—could this person be in a position to know
what he or she is claiming to know? You have to sort it out from all
the other events that never happened. A source wants to be paid again
for information, and some will tell you anything to get paid—if they
heard a rumor or they just made it up. They may do all sorts of things
to stay on your list of sources.
Diplomats at the 190 different missions throughout the world shift
through the raw material, analyze it and write up synopses in
diplomatic cables. These hundreds of thousands of cables comprise the
latest WikiLeaks release. And the fact they are synthesized by senior
personnel with a high level of reliability makes their release even
more significant. Bottom line, the country’s most valuable sources
could be potentially driven away, said Segal, who added that his State
Department colleagues say this is exactly what’s happening.
“With this WikiLeaks release, the sources have been warned. They now
understand that if they talk to you, their name will show up in
public. No longer will we be able to put the names of sources in the
cables; they’ll have to be sent separately.”
More energy and resources must be spent on building new sources, and
that takes time, Segal said.
“It’s hard work. I’ve done it. You’ve got to socialize with people and
try to loosen them up enough to talk about their work. It will hurt us
as a nation, our allies, because we exchange information with our
allies, we have intelligence exchanges. We have a network, and that’s
how we find all the terrorist groups. We talk to each other every day
on the Intelnet, a network of intelligence agencies, and we’re
constantly sharing information.”
Julius Assange did not release the most sensitive and secretive
cables, known as “nodis” or no distribution. If you need an example of
a nodis, go to the back of Bob Woodward’s book, “Obama’s War”. For a
particularly compelling nodis, Google “nodis + Ambassador Eikenberry +
Afghanistan.
“That sort of information was meant only for the eyes of the highest
government officials – the Secretaries of State and Defense and the
President.  But someone decided to leak it to the media and doing so
revealed a split within our leadership. That information is useful to
our enemies. I recognize the argument for transparency but there also
has to be a channel for private discussion,” Segal said.
If there is a message there for our government, it’s to remind those
at the highest level that discussions on important issues like
Afghanistan must take place in public. Before we ever go to war,
Congress should be made to vote on a Declaration of War, which would
force debate and transparency, he said.
“Our government could improve what it’s doing by making internal
debates more open. Now it’s more like, ‘We did the review and here’s
the conclusion.’ Like pulling a rabbit out of the hat rather than a
true public dialogue of here are the options we are being hit with.
The reason there’s so much interest in WikiLeaks is that we’re not
doing enough of that. We didn’t hear the debate over the options on
the defense budget, for example. It was just decided. Same thing with
Afghanistan.
“But it shouldn’t be Julian Assange deciding for everybody in the
world what gets out there. It’s too much power for one person, and I
hope he’s going to run out of material. But I don’t know.”

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close