Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Treadrite 1//3/11
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Treadrite 1//3/11

- January 3rd, 2011
Treadrite: Benzie entrepreneurs manufacture snowshoes from old tires
For years people have been trying to come up with ways to recycle old car tires. No longer acceptable in landfills, old tires have become an environmental nightmare. Now, two Benzie County entrepreneurs have developed one solution: making snowshoes from old tires.
“Well actually, someone else developed the concept -- he had a tire business here in Northern Michigan,” said Steve Herkner. “My partner Scott Griner and myself have a maple syrup business and we were looking for ways to get through the deep snow in February and March. The snowshoes out there today are really for groomed trails and not deep snow. Through a friend we came across these snowshoes made from old tires and they worked great.”
A few years back the partners left their snowshoes in a shed and over the summer mice chewed through the straps, so they set out to either have them repaired or purchase new ones.
“We called the guy we bought them from and he told us he quit making them. He was never really in business. he owned a tire shop and came up with the idea about 20 years ago,” said Scott Griner. “He just made them for family and friends and told us he wanted no part of making them so we asked him if we could buy his idea and equipment and he agreed.”

So three years ago Griner and Herkner formed S&S Snowshoes and opened up a small manufacturing operation in Benzie County. They launched a website to sell the snowshoes and also began selling them at Herner’s store, The Pantry Shelf in Grawn. The two made some minor adjustments to design, including an easy on and off strap system.
“They have been selling well and we have gotten great feedback on them,” said Herkner. “Both of us have day businesses so we are not trying to set any sales records just yet as these are very labor-intensive and Scott and myself make all of them in our spare time.”
The Treadrite snowshoes are flexible and are easy to strap on, making them appealing to those interested in hiking in deep snow.
“That is what is great about these snowshoes is that they really work well in deep snow and trails that have not been groomed,” said Herkner. “Another great thing about these snowshoes is that they are flexible, so if you step on a log the snowshoes flex because they are made out of rubber.”
The partners are now in their third winter selling Treadrites that come in four different widths (the deeper snow, the wider the shoe) and to date, they have sold a few hundred pairs. As for the future, they will see what the demand is before expanding production.

“Right now it takes one and half hours to make one pair of snowshoes. Scott and myself make them by hand and I made eight pairs over the Thanksgiving weekend,” said Herkner. “We both have other businesses so we will have to see. We have been approached by a couple of others who want to retail these so we might expand, but right now we are not in a hurry.”
“I like their versatility, I bought them for hunting and they are great in the cedar swamps and other hard to get places,” said Jim Potter of Interlochen. “They are very durable and I like the environmental aspect as well; it is cool, these are definitely ‘green’ snowshoes. I have turned my friends on to them. They love them as well.”
Treadrite snowshoes retails for $75 a pair. In addition to using recycled tires, they are constructed with high-strength cloth straps, industrial-grade rivets that double as cleats to provide excellent traction, and secure, durable bindings that are easy to put on and take off.
To learn more check out www.sssnowshoes.com where there is an online order form. The shoes may also be purchased at the Pantry Shelf in Grawn.
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