Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Hana Malhas
. . . .

Hana Malhas

Rick Coates - November 8th, 2010
Exotic Import Hana Malhas
By Rick Coates
The Mideast meets the Midwest when Jordanian singer-songwriter Hana
Malhas brings her indie folk to the stage of the InsideOut Gallery
this Saturday.
Born and raised in Jordan, Hana (pronounced Hena) made her way to the
U.S. 11 years ago to attend the University of Michigan, earning both
undergraduate and graduate degrees from the prestigious Stephen M.
Ross School of Business. She fell in love with Ann Arbor and found a
financial position with a non-profit.
Crunching numbers is her day job; her nights and weekends are about
crunching chords. Her stop at the InsideOut Gallery in Traverse City
will be her first as a solo artist.
“I was in this band Lazy Sunday, and we played a coffee shop and a
festival up there about five years ago,” said Malhas. “I decided to
pursue a solo effort in 2008 and I recently released an album, and so
now I am touring on weekends in support.”
Malhas’ soulful, folkie voice is angelic at times and also has an
explosive rock edge to it.

LIFE IN JORDAN
She grew up listening and playing classical music on the piano and
guitar and was exposed to Middle Eastern music, but was equally drawn
to American music.
“My father’s CD collection was diverse; he had Cat Stevens, The
Eagles, Queen, Michael Jackson, and I remember my father walking
around the house singing Elton John songs all the time. So I grew up
exposed to a wide array of musical styles, including Arabic pop music.
I heard a lot of American music performed live by cover bands from
Jordan. I was a big Guns ‘n’ Roses fan as well. It wasn’t until I came
to Ann Arbor that I became exposed to music that was not part of the
mainstream.”
Malhas is quick to point out that her Jordanian background probably
won’t be evident in her music.
“Most of my songs really fit the American indie folk sound. I have a
song, ‘Trooh,’ on the album that I sing in Arabic, but everything else
is English. Really, how my music is connected to both cultures is
lyrically. I write songs based on my observations of having lived in
the Middle East (she still visits at least once a year) and now living
in the Midwest.”

INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION
Her debut solo album “Shapeshift” was recorded in four locations
(including Jordan) with 17 American and Jordanian artists.
“This album is an introspective collection of songs that reinforces my
 cross-cultural collaborative experiences,” said Malhas. “Lyrically I
explored several themes from war and solitude to relationships and
redemption, along with budding yet suppressed passion and death and
loss.”
While Malhas is only working part time at her musical career, she has
both feet into it and plans to make it full time work soon.
“I love creating and analyzing Excel spreadsheets and making music, so
I hope to someday create projects that somehow combine both,” she
said. “The business of making music is changing and the independent
artist such as myself who prefers the alternative indie folk style
does have an opportunity to work full time at their craft. I have to
believe that my ability to crunch numbers will come in handy in this
endeavor.”

Hana Malhas will be joined by Lake Folk, a roots-folk quintet from Ann
Arbor on Saturday, November 13 at the Inside Out Gallery in the
Warehouse District of Downtown Traverse City. For tickets or
additional information seek out InsideOut Gallery on Facebook or call
them at 231.929.3254. To hear a sampling of Hana Malhas go to
www.hanamalhas.com or find videos on Youtube.

 
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