Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Fox on a Hill
. . . .

Fox on a Hill

Kristi Kates - November 8th, 2010
Fox on a Hill: Celebrates Four Years
By Kristi Kates
Fox hunting takes a musical twist this week with an organization whose
‘targets’ are promising musicians.
Founded by Patrick Schaller, Susan Fawcett, and Clay Ebert, Fox on a
Hill Productions is becoming well-known for their promotion of
primarily Michigan-based musicians, artists, and filmmakers.
Four years in, and they’re still going strong - and celebrating their
fourth anniversary with their annual musical celebration. The event
also celebrates four years’ worth of helping bring a great range of
local talent to the public eye.
“We distribute local music to over 30 retailers in Michigan,” Patrick
Schaller says. “We have financed dozens of music albums, and have
executive-produced a full-feature documentary called ‘La Curacion.’
Clay and I purchased Susan’s equity last year, and we continue to run
the company with a small staff out of Petoskey, selecting musicians to
work with based on their presence in the Michigan music scene.”
So far, Fox on a Hill has primarily worked with musicians from
Earthwork Music, choosing artists for such events as the anniversary
show via, as Schaller puts it, “our existing relationships and their
amazing talent.”

COMING ATTRACTION
For the anniversary show, set to take place on November 13th, Fox on a
Hill will be featuring Northern Michigan native and improv pianist
Biny Andrews, Kalamazoo roots-rock band Who Hit John?, Lansing duo
Gifts or Creatures (husband/wife folk musicians Brandon and Bethany
Foote), Americana/folk duo Jen Sygit and Sam Corbin, and Grand Haven
singer-songwriter Kali Rea.
Schaller says that Andrews will be a particular highlight of the evening.
“Biny will be launching his debut album, produced by Fox on a Hill, at
the event. We are very excited to do a project like Biny’s, outside
our traditional catalog of contemporary folk music.”
Another highlight of the showcase will be the introduction to the
public of yet another venture aimed at showcasing future Fox on a Hill
events.
“I own both the restaurant/bar complex where the event will be taking
place (the empty commercial space formerly known as “220 Lake Street
Food and Spirits) and the attached Boyne City Theatre/Opera House, and
I am looking at potentially announcing the setting up of a non-profit
to fundraise the rejuvenation of the historic theater,” he says.
“It would be fantastic to renovate the theatre/opera house and hold
future Fox on a Hill performances, show films, and other entertainment
events. This theatre could really add a great vibe to the Boyne City
Sobo Arts District.”
Fox on a Hill’s Clay Ebert agrees that more support for local arts is
definitely needed.

INDIE, FOLK, OR BOTH?
“The state of indie music (here) is ripe with talent but drastically
underfunded,” Ebert says. “Thankfully, it’s improving with the advance
of technology. Tax credits for the music industry would also help the
indie labels improve the music scene in Michigan.”
Outside of Michigan, the term “indie music” isn’t limited to the
folk/roots scene that is prevalent in Northern Michigan - it’s
actually more focused on indie rock, pop, electronica, and more edgy,
experimental sounds. But Ebert points out that for Northern
Michiganders, that more acoustic sound is what independent music means
to this particular region.
“I think one reason that indie music in Northern Michigan is focused
on roots music more than any other genre is because it is very much a
part of Northern Michigan’s history,” he says. “Folk music seems to be
very connected to an energy that is about positive change and
environmental conscientiousness, which is something that new
generations of musicians are identifying with. We are currently
reviewing potential projects and events for Fox on a Hill this winter,
as Fox on a Hill best contributes to the local music scene by helping
artists get indie music into the hands of listeners who may not
otherwise have had the chance to experience it.”

Fox on a Hill’s 4th Anniversary Concert will take place on Saturday,
November 13 from 5 pm to 9 pm (doors open at 4:30 pm) at 220 South
Lake Street in Boyne City. Tickets and more info can be found at
www.foxonahill.com.

 
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