Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Jill‘s Gallery
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Jill‘s Gallery

Erin Cowell - November 15th, 2010
Five Friends in Art: Jill’s Gallery offers a fall open house
By Erin Crowell
Unlike most art sales that bring the work of several strangers
together, the Second Annual Fall Open House & Art Sale combines the
work of five sisters and friends. Expect lots of color and variety
when these five Northern Michigan female artists present their work in
support of a local cause at the Second Annual Fall Open House & Art
Sale at Jill’s Studio, in Traverse City, on Saturday, Nov. 20, from 9
a.m.-5 p.m.
Gallery owner Jill Hinds, along with sister Jeanne Hinds, sister
in-law Jan Hinds and friends Nan Bedick and Lisa Wilkins Schulte will
donate 10% of all artwork sales to the Father Fred Foundation, the
Traverse City non-profit that provides food, clothing and assistance
to Grand Traverse area residents in need.
Last year the open house raised around $4,000 for the foundation and
brought in over 150 visitors to the studio, said Hinds.
“It was extremely busy,” she added, “and that was mainly inviting just
friends and family and others we knew. Last year it was just seeing
how it goes.”
While Schulte’s work has appeared in galleries throughout the area
including Gallery 50 in Traverse City, Michigan Artists Gallery in
Suttons Bay and Kuhlhaus Gallery in Harbor Springs, the other four
women utilize the open house as their primary means of selling
artwork.
“Jan does the craft shows, otherwise for the three of us, this is our
once a year big way to expose our work and do the commercial thing.
Then the rest of the year it’s just creating and exploring,” said
Hinds.

AN EVOLUTION
While the five artists work in different mediums, all have dabbled in
another – making the open house a true evolutionary exhibit.
Since retiring in 2004, Jill Hinds has explored painting, particularly
“en plein air” (where the artist works on a piece outdoors) – a
contrast to her 25 years teaching visual communications and computer
graphics at Northwestern Michigan College.
“When I was first teaching, everything was hand done like hand
lettering…even sharpening the pencil to do the lettering,” said Hinds.
“Then everything turned into computer graphics and I missed that pure,
raw creativity that comes from sketching and drawing.”
Today, Hinds “gets her hands dirty,” as she puts it, spending a
majority of her time painting in acrylics and pastels.
Sister-in-law Jan Hinds started working with basket weaving in 1981
when she eventually became allergic to most of the weaving materials.
Then, by adding acrylic paint to cotton paper, Hinds discovered color
and a new medium mix of painting and crafting.
Jeanne Hinds first started working primarily with crochet and knitting
when she shifted her focus to recycled and discarded materials.
“Artists evolve. This is what we do,” said Schulte, who has recently
turned her focus from pastel to acrylic painting. “You get an idea,
you run with it and that leads to another idea. I’m heading in more of
an abstract direction, but of course that could change mid-flight.”
Color has become a considerable preference for many of the artists,
along with utilizing the natural beauty of the area.
Bedick, a resident on Old Mission Peninsula, said she is constantly
influenced by the lakes, skies, vineyards and orchards, using pastels
or acrylics for her work.
Schulte agrees.
“I love to paint landscapes,” she said, “and I love to work with
color, slinging it around and manipulating the paint.”
Working outside has also become a favorable escape for Hinds, as well.
“There’s just something nice and pure about being outside and
painting,” she said. “It’s just freeing versus being at a computer.
Otherwise you’re just plugged in.”

All art sold at the Annual Fall Open House & Art Sale will be
available for under $200 and will include postcards, jewelry, scarves,
paintings, baskets and more. Refreshments will be served during the
event, which runs 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Jill’s Studio is located at 347 N West
Silver Lake Road, just south of Traverse City. For more information on
the event and artists, email Jill Hinds at jills_studio@me.com.

 
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