Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Art · Cogs Creek Collective
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Cogs Creek Collective

Al Parker - November 29th, 2010
Cog’s Creek Collective : Offers New Art Gallery & Café
By Al Parker
Kim Bazemore smiles widely, wipes her hands on a rag and talks about her latest project of turning a neglected building into a home for creative art and artists. “It’s been a lot of work over a long time, but it’s coming together,” she says, her voice rising with excitement.
“It” is the Cog’s Creek Collective, a 6,000-square-foot building in Traverse City’s “Little Bohemia” neighborhood, tucked behind the popular Lil Bo Pub & Grille on North Maple Street.
The former home of Coddington Cleaners, the building now houses an art gallery for Bazemore’s gold and silver jewelry creations, an eatery, a clothing designer, a knife sharpening workshop and room for more artisans.
A grand opening celebration is set for Friday, Dec. 3 at the century-old building that took about a year to renovate. About 10 artists are expected to display their creations – paintings, photography, furniture, modern art quilts, ornaments and more. It’ll be catered by their neighbor, Lil Bo Pub & Grille.

TRANSFORMATION
“The building was built in the early 1900s, 1906 exactly,” says Ben Brown, owner of Dragonfly Woodcraft who did much of the remodeling work. “There was an addition in 1947 and in the 1950s they added the loading dock.”
A Georgia native, Bazemore studied interior design and has adapted that background to her jewelry making. She crafts works of art in sterling silver and 14-karat gold, using beach glass and stones from Lake Michigan. “I’ve been doing this for 25 years,” she says.
For the past decade or so, she’s also been busy renovating vintage buildings. Her first project was her home, a Traverse City church that she remodeled into a residence. Then she turned her attention to City Studio, a gallery and exhibition space created by herself through a renovation of a Craftsman-style bungalow on the corner of 8th Street and Hastings.
That building dates back to the 1930s and is located in a part of Traverse City that was rezoned commercial from residential, so the renovation is an excellent example of adaptive re-use – a concept straight out of the New Urbanism movement, in which an existing structure is renovated to fit the context of the new zoning.
At Cog’s Creek Collective, rather than an old dry cleaners, the building more resembles a fortress, with concrete walls that are three feet thick in some places. The basement still houses a heavy-duty vault where furs and other valuables were routinely stored for Coddington customers.

FIXER-UPPER
Bazemore and her workers spent about 200 hours refurbishing the building’s old steel windows, the cleaners’ old glass block windows with modern aluminum “store front” style windows with double-paned tempered glass.
The project took miles of electrical wiring, extensive duct work, plumbing, drywall, insulation, priming and painting over the past year.
Local chef and baker Ralph Humes will operate a 740-square-foot sandwich and dessert shop, Sweet Alchemy Lounge and Café. He was a partner in Old Town’s Soul Hole before leaving the restaurant and is now teamed with Pearl and Pete Brown, owners of the bread company, Old Mission Multigrain.
Clothing designer Neashasha will display her creations in a 400-square foot site in the collective. All of her clothing utilizes collected, recycled and found materials.
Knife sharpener Tony Valerio has a workshop for his VSI Sharpening service, which has been keeping edges sharp for clients at hair salons, the food service industry, animal groomers, floral shops and more. He also serves residential customers through his mobile services.
“We’ve had a lot of curiosity seekers stop by,” says Bazemore. “The neighbors are welcome to stop in and see us. We’re just thrilled that we’ll have art for the holidays.”

Cog’s Creek Collective is located at 124 North Maple Street in Traverse City. For more information, call (231) 620-0458.
 
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