Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

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Cogs Creek Collective

Al Parker - November 29th, 2010
Cog’s Creek Collective : Offers New Art Gallery & Café
By Al Parker
Kim Bazemore smiles widely, wipes her hands on a rag and talks about her latest project of turning a neglected building into a home for creative art and artists. “It’s been a lot of work over a long time, but it’s coming together,” she says, her voice rising with excitement.
“It” is the Cog’s Creek Collective, a 6,000-square-foot building in Traverse City’s “Little Bohemia” neighborhood, tucked behind the popular Lil Bo Pub & Grille on North Maple Street.
The former home of Coddington Cleaners, the building now houses an art gallery for Bazemore’s gold and silver jewelry creations, an eatery, a clothing designer, a knife sharpening workshop and room for more artisans.
A grand opening celebration is set for Friday, Dec. 3 at the century-old building that took about a year to renovate. About 10 artists are expected to display their creations – paintings, photography, furniture, modern art quilts, ornaments and more. It’ll be catered by their neighbor, Lil Bo Pub & Grille.

“The building was built in the early 1900s, 1906 exactly,” says Ben Brown, owner of Dragonfly Woodcraft who did much of the remodeling work. “There was an addition in 1947 and in the 1950s they added the loading dock.”
A Georgia native, Bazemore studied interior design and has adapted that background to her jewelry making. She crafts works of art in sterling silver and 14-karat gold, using beach glass and stones from Lake Michigan. “I’ve been doing this for 25 years,” she says.
For the past decade or so, she’s also been busy renovating vintage buildings. Her first project was her home, a Traverse City church that she remodeled into a residence. Then she turned her attention to City Studio, a gallery and exhibition space created by herself through a renovation of a Craftsman-style bungalow on the corner of 8th Street and Hastings.
That building dates back to the 1930s and is located in a part of Traverse City that was rezoned commercial from residential, so the renovation is an excellent example of adaptive re-use – a concept straight out of the New Urbanism movement, in which an existing structure is renovated to fit the context of the new zoning.
At Cog’s Creek Collective, rather than an old dry cleaners, the building more resembles a fortress, with concrete walls that are three feet thick in some places. The basement still houses a heavy-duty vault where furs and other valuables were routinely stored for Coddington customers.

Bazemore and her workers spent about 200 hours refurbishing the building’s old steel windows, the cleaners’ old glass block windows with modern aluminum “store front” style windows with double-paned tempered glass.
The project took miles of electrical wiring, extensive duct work, plumbing, drywall, insulation, priming and painting over the past year.
Local chef and baker Ralph Humes will operate a 740-square-foot sandwich and dessert shop, Sweet Alchemy Lounge and Café. He was a partner in Old Town’s Soul Hole before leaving the restaurant and is now teamed with Pearl and Pete Brown, owners of the bread company, Old Mission Multigrain.
Clothing designer Neashasha will display her creations in a 400-square foot site in the collective. All of her clothing utilizes collected, recycled and found materials.
Knife sharpener Tony Valerio has a workshop for his VSI Sharpening service, which has been keeping edges sharp for clients at hair salons, the food service industry, animal groomers, floral shops and more. He also serves residential customers through his mobile services.
“We’ve had a lot of curiosity seekers stop by,” says Bazemore. “The neighbors are welcome to stop in and see us. We’re just thrilled that we’ll have art for the holidays.”

Cog’s Creek Collective is located at 124 North Maple Street in Traverse City. For more information, call (231) 620-0458.
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