Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

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Cogs Creek Collective

Al Parker - November 29th, 2010
Cog’s Creek Collective : Offers New Art Gallery & Café
By Al Parker
Kim Bazemore smiles widely, wipes her hands on a rag and talks about her latest project of turning a neglected building into a home for creative art and artists. “It’s been a lot of work over a long time, but it’s coming together,” she says, her voice rising with excitement.
“It” is the Cog’s Creek Collective, a 6,000-square-foot building in Traverse City’s “Little Bohemia” neighborhood, tucked behind the popular Lil Bo Pub & Grille on North Maple Street.
The former home of Coddington Cleaners, the building now houses an art gallery for Bazemore’s gold and silver jewelry creations, an eatery, a clothing designer, a knife sharpening workshop and room for more artisans.
A grand opening celebration is set for Friday, Dec. 3 at the century-old building that took about a year to renovate. About 10 artists are expected to display their creations – paintings, photography, furniture, modern art quilts, ornaments and more. It’ll be catered by their neighbor, Lil Bo Pub & Grille.

TRANSFORMATION
“The building was built in the early 1900s, 1906 exactly,” says Ben Brown, owner of Dragonfly Woodcraft who did much of the remodeling work. “There was an addition in 1947 and in the 1950s they added the loading dock.”
A Georgia native, Bazemore studied interior design and has adapted that background to her jewelry making. She crafts works of art in sterling silver and 14-karat gold, using beach glass and stones from Lake Michigan. “I’ve been doing this for 25 years,” she says.
For the past decade or so, she’s also been busy renovating vintage buildings. Her first project was her home, a Traverse City church that she remodeled into a residence. Then she turned her attention to City Studio, a gallery and exhibition space created by herself through a renovation of a Craftsman-style bungalow on the corner of 8th Street and Hastings.
That building dates back to the 1930s and is located in a part of Traverse City that was rezoned commercial from residential, so the renovation is an excellent example of adaptive re-use – a concept straight out of the New Urbanism movement, in which an existing structure is renovated to fit the context of the new zoning.
At Cog’s Creek Collective, rather than an old dry cleaners, the building more resembles a fortress, with concrete walls that are three feet thick in some places. The basement still houses a heavy-duty vault where furs and other valuables were routinely stored for Coddington customers.

FIXER-UPPER
Bazemore and her workers spent about 200 hours refurbishing the building’s old steel windows, the cleaners’ old glass block windows with modern aluminum “store front” style windows with double-paned tempered glass.
The project took miles of electrical wiring, extensive duct work, plumbing, drywall, insulation, priming and painting over the past year.
Local chef and baker Ralph Humes will operate a 740-square-foot sandwich and dessert shop, Sweet Alchemy Lounge and Café. He was a partner in Old Town’s Soul Hole before leaving the restaurant and is now teamed with Pearl and Pete Brown, owners of the bread company, Old Mission Multigrain.
Clothing designer Neashasha will display her creations in a 400-square foot site in the collective. All of her clothing utilizes collected, recycled and found materials.
Knife sharpener Tony Valerio has a workshop for his VSI Sharpening service, which has been keeping edges sharp for clients at hair salons, the food service industry, animal groomers, floral shops and more. He also serves residential customers through his mobile services.
“We’ve had a lot of curiosity seekers stop by,” says Bazemore. “The neighbors are welcome to stop in and see us. We’re just thrilled that we’ll have art for the holidays.”

Cog’s Creek Collective is located at 124 North Maple Street in Traverse City. For more information, call (231) 620-0458.
 
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