Letters

Letters 09-15-2014

Stop The Games On Campus

Four head coaches – two at U of M and two at MSU – get a total of $13 million of your taxpayer dollars each year. Their staffs get another $11 million...

The Truth About Fatbikes

While we appreciate the fatbike trail coverage, the quote from the article below is exactly what we demonstrated not to be true in most cases last season...

Man Has Environmental Responsibility

I tend to agree with Thomas Kachadurian (“Playing God,” Sept. 8) that we should not interfere with the power of nature by deciding what is “native” and what is not. Man usually does what is better for man (or so we believe), hence the survival and population growth of our species...

The Bush & Obama Facts

Don Turner’s letter to the editor on 8/25/14 stated that there has never been a more corrupt, dishonest, etc. set of politicians in the White House. He states no facts, but here are a few...

Ban Pesticides

I grew up downstate in a neighborhood without pesticides. I was always very healthy. Living here, I have become ill. So I did my research and found out a lot about these poison agents called pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, chemical fertilizers, etc) that are being spread throughout this community, accumulating in our air, water and soil...

Respect for Presidents?

Recently we read the Letter to the Editor that encouraged us to stop characterizing President Obama as anything other than an upstanding, moral, inspiring “first Black President”. The author would have us think that the rancor in the press, media and public is misguided. And, believe it or not, this rancor is a “glaring exception to … unwritten patriotic rule” of historically supporting all previous presidents...


Home · Articles · News · Art · Digital Art at the Dennos
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Digital Art at the Dennos

Robert Downes - January 17th, 2011
Digital Art at the Dennos: Korean artist Lee nam Lee brings classic paintings to life 1/17/11
Blending digital technology with classic paintings of the East and West is the challenge of Lee nam Lee, whose exhibition “A Conversation Between Monet and Sochi” will run at the Dennos Museum Center through March 27.
A sculptor by background and a master of digital technology, Lee nam Lee brings wall-sized paintings to life, even to the point of interacting with other paintings.
In the exhibit’s main work, a waterscape painting by French impressionist Claude Monet (1840-1926) is projected side-by-side with a water scene by Korean artist Sochi (1803-1893) on a 40-foot-wide wall. Other than their shared use of water, the paintings are completely different in style. Yet by using digital technology, Lee nam induces the paintings to move and interact.
A fisherman pilots a tiny boat from the Monet painting to that of Sochi’s work. Seasons change and day becomes night while an island in the Sochi painting migrates to Monet’s lake. The lights of two cities -- Paris and Seoul -- glimmer in the snowy distance as night falls, with sublime images captured in the dawn -- all in the space of 11 minutes.
At the exhibition, various paintings will also be shown in backlit frames. In Vermeer’s “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” the celebrated Dutch girl sheds a digital tear. Elsewhere, a Van Gogh self-portrait comes to life with the aid of pulsing digital colors.
A sculptor by background, Lee nam was born in Damyang, Korea in 1969 and holds an MFA from that country’s Chosen University as well as a DFA from Yonsei University. His digital imagery brings its own vivid quality to the work of great artists, and as in the case of his cityscapes, he expands the viewer’s imagination beyond the bounds of masterpieces created in the 19th century.
“I saw an exhibition of his work in Beijing and knew we had to have it shown here,” says Dennos Director Gene Jenneman. While Lee nam has shown his work in over 200 exhibitions in Korea, Beijing, New York and Washington, D.C., the Traverse City event will be his first solo exhibition of his “Monet and Sochi” work as well as other digital recreations.
-- by Robert Downes

The Dennos Museum Center is open Monday to Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m, Thursday until 8 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. Admission is $6 adults, $4 for children and free to museum members. For more information on the Museum and exhibition, go to http://www.dennosmuseum.org or call 231-995-1055. The museum is located at the entrance to the campus of Northwestern Michigan College.

 
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