Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Digital Art at the Dennos
. . . .

Digital Art at the Dennos

Robert Downes - January 17th, 2011
Digital Art at the Dennos: Korean artist Lee nam Lee brings classic paintings to life 1/17/11
Blending digital technology with classic paintings of the East and West is the challenge of Lee nam Lee, whose exhibition “A Conversation Between Monet and Sochi” will run at the Dennos Museum Center through March 27.
A sculptor by background and a master of digital technology, Lee nam Lee brings wall-sized paintings to life, even to the point of interacting with other paintings.
In the exhibit’s main work, a waterscape painting by French impressionist Claude Monet (1840-1926) is projected side-by-side with a water scene by Korean artist Sochi (1803-1893) on a 40-foot-wide wall. Other than their shared use of water, the paintings are completely different in style. Yet by using digital technology, Lee nam induces the paintings to move and interact.
A fisherman pilots a tiny boat from the Monet painting to that of Sochi’s work. Seasons change and day becomes night while an island in the Sochi painting migrates to Monet’s lake. The lights of two cities -- Paris and Seoul -- glimmer in the snowy distance as night falls, with sublime images captured in the dawn -- all in the space of 11 minutes.
At the exhibition, various paintings will also be shown in backlit frames. In Vermeer’s “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” the celebrated Dutch girl sheds a digital tear. Elsewhere, a Van Gogh self-portrait comes to life with the aid of pulsing digital colors.
A sculptor by background, Lee nam was born in Damyang, Korea in 1969 and holds an MFA from that country’s Chosen University as well as a DFA from Yonsei University. His digital imagery brings its own vivid quality to the work of great artists, and as in the case of his cityscapes, he expands the viewer’s imagination beyond the bounds of masterpieces created in the 19th century.
“I saw an exhibition of his work in Beijing and knew we had to have it shown here,” says Dennos Director Gene Jenneman. While Lee nam has shown his work in over 200 exhibitions in Korea, Beijing, New York and Washington, D.C., the Traverse City event will be his first solo exhibition of his “Monet and Sochi” work as well as other digital recreations.
-- by Robert Downes

The Dennos Museum Center is open Monday to Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m, Thursday until 8 p.m. and Sundays 1-5 p.m. Admission is $6 adults, $4 for children and free to museum members. For more information on the Museum and exhibition, go to http://www.dennosmuseum.org or call 231-995-1055. The museum is located at the entrance to the campus of Northwestern Michigan College.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close