Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Butch Thompson
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Butch Thompson

Kristi Kates - January 17th, 2011
Butch Thompson, Jazz Original 1/17/11
By Kristi Kates
Accomplished pianist/clarinetist Butch Thompson - also a Grammy Award winner and one of Garrison Keillor’s Prairie Home Companion sidekicks - is on his way to the City Opera House in TC this Saturday, complete with his all-star New Orleans Jazz Originals lineup.
It’s set to be a great show from the career musician and informal jazz historian who’s well-steeped in the legends and sounds of the N’Awlins music scene - a long cry from Thompson’s low-key Midwestern beginnings.
“I was born in a small town on the St. Croix River in Minnesota,” Thompson explains. “the population there was 300, with the nearest ‘big city,’ St. Paul, about 30 miles away.”
The first live music Thompson heard was played on the family’s upright piano. He started formal lessons with a local pianist when he was six, and grew up listening to his dad’s jazz recordings up to the World War II era, becoming a fan of Louis Armstrong from the time he turned 10 years old.
“What fascinated me about that music was the rhythm, I think,” Thompson says, “as a teenager, I was also involved with the ’50s music of my own generation - Fats Domino, Elvis - but I was more fascinated with early jazz.”
Piano lessons began for Thompson at the age of six, while clarinet became part of his musical life in high school, where he played in the school band.
“I loved the clarinet because I had heard great jazz clarinetists on my dad’s records,” Thompson recollects. “I was also crazy about boogie-woogie piano as a teenager, and used to play the ‘50s popular hits in that style, which went over very well with my high school classmates.”
In college, he met the Hall Brothers Jazz Band, a six-piece outfit that played traditional New Orleans-style jazz, and they took the upstart performer on as their clarinetist Louisiana suddenly became only a few steps away.
“I learned a lot from them, and traveled to New Orleans numerous times while in college,” he says.

NEW ORLEANS TRAINING
Thompson’s experiences in New Orleans were anchored by his early meetings of what he calls “the old-timers” - N’Awlins “local legend” musicians who were part of the scene there.
“There was a clarinetist, George Lewis - he was in his early ’60s when I met him - I bought all the recordings (of his) that I could find, and tried hard to imitate everything he did,” Thompson says.
New Orleans famed Preservation Hall, set deep in the French Quarter with its rotating roster of jazz bands, opened in 1961 - and Thompson was practically on its doorstep, soon to become one of the few non-locals to perform at the venue.
“I was there by early 1962.” he says, “The entire Hall Brothers band was there, and we were invited to play a party. Allan Jaffe, who ran the place, invited a lot of the older musicians who performed regularly at the Hall, so we sat there and played for them. They were extremely friendly and interested in what we were doing - which was wonderful - but the best part was when a number of them sat in.
“That’s where my real New Orleans training began.”
By the mid-’60s, Thompson was learning everything that he could about the old style in New Orleans, right alongside his fellow musicians, both established talents and “newbies.” He never actually lived in the city of his inspiration, but he spent ample chunks of time there, and was sometimes even hired to perform with some of his heroes.
“It was a great honor, and I learned more than I can possibly say,” Thompson says.

JUMPIN’ JAZZ ORIGINALS
Taking all of this acquired knowledge and skill and putting it into a band project of his own would become the achievement that Thompson is perhaps best known for these days, next to his work with Keillor’s show (he was house pianist/bandleader for Prairie Home... from 1974 to 1985, and continues to make appearances today) His popular New Orleans Jazz Originals group brings together some of the best early jazz players in the country, with Thompson happily at the helm.
“They’re all friends and collaborators of mine,” he says, “they’re from all over the country, and we can only get together on tour, but whenever we book a show, everything just gells perfectly.”
The band, Thompson says, doesn’t have a particular method of putting together their live setlist, either.
“The simple answer is that we play things we like,” he explains, “we include ragtime, blues, vintage pop songs, spirituals, and more.”
This, of course, is part of the band’s success - not only do they include tunes that will appeal to a wide range of jazz fans, but their carefree enthusiasm is infectious, as is Thompson’s own appreciation for the opportunities he’s had as a musician to date. His shows are fun and energetic, and the music, of course, is played with top-notch skill.
“I am extremely lucky to be able to bring the music that means so much to me to a wider audience,” he says, “my shows are not designed as history lessons - they’re supposed to be entertainment. It’s a lesson I take from Louis Armstrong. He had the highest musical standards, but a big part of his mission was to entertain - it’s the New Orleans way.”

Butch Thompson and The New Orleans Jazz Originals will be in concert at the City Opera House in Traverse City on Saturday, January 22, at 8 p.m. Tickets $35/$20, student tickets $15. www.cityoperahouse.org.


 
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