Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Ruthie Foster
. . . .

Ruthie Foster

Kristi Kates - January 17th, 2011
Ruthie Foster’s Truthful Music 1/17/11
By Kristi Kates
T he Truth According to Ruthie Foster is the title of
singer-songwriter Ruthie Foster’s new album, songs of which Foster
herself will be bringing to TC’s InsideOut Gallery on Sunday, January
23.
Foster’s life to date has been long, challenging, and full of rich
anecdotes, and she infuses her music with many of those experiences
and influences, from Central Texas to stages and performances across
the U.S. and beyond.
The young Ruthie Foster was surrounded by a wide variety of music,
from the hymns her mother taught her to a book of Beatles songs passed
along by her guitar teacher; to classic country and pop heard through
the family’s radios, to the 45 rpm records her uncle, a trucker, would
drop off during his visits.
“It didn’t matter to me what genre it was,” Foster explains in her
official bio, “I just took it all in as great music.”
She debuted at the age of 14 as a soloist in her uncle’s choir, and in
college crafted her own schedule of classes by day and performance
clubs at night. Soon, she was fronting a blues band that traveled
across Texas - but before too long, Foster started to wonder what else
was out there.
“So I joined the Navy,” she says.

NAVY TO NEW YORK
The pull of music didn’t leave her for long, though. At her helicopter
squadron’s holiday party, she sat in with the band - and was quickly
signed up by Pride, a Navy band that played funk and Top 40 tunes at
Navy recruitment drives. With Foster being the only woman in the
group, she learned quickly, she says, to hold her own on the road,
which would be another important point of growth for this
constantly-learning performer.
From Texas, it was on to New York, where she collaborated with the
city’s songwriters, played at folk venues, and snagged a contract with
Atlantic Records. Another (albeit temporary) roadblock arrived when
Atlantic decreed that she wasn’t the power-ballad singer they’d
envisioned her to be, so Foster retreated back to Texas to deal with
that situation as well as some family issues.

SOULFUL FUTURE
Austin, Texas, is now Foster’s base - and the music has called her
back, as well. She’s now recorded five albums, continually writes
songs, and has performed a plethora of live shows in which she’s been
compared to the likes of Ella Fitzgerald and Aretha Franklin.
On her latest aforementioned album, she worked in Nashville with roots
music producer Chris Goldsmith to oversee her collaborations with a
wide range of musicians, from guitar icon Robben Ford (Bob Dylan/Joni
Mitchell) to Taj Mahal bassist Larry Fulcher, Ben Harper/Tracy Chapman
drummer Rock Deadrick, and one of Aretha Franklin’s own keyboardists,
Jim Dickinson, who’s also worked with the likes of Mudhoney and
Screamin’ Jay Hawkins.
The result of those sessions, The Truth According to Ruthie Foster,
offers songs both big and quiet; the ’70s energy of “Stone Love,” the
reggae rhythms of “I Really Love You,” the funktastic, horn-bedecked
“Dues Paid in Full,” and the downbeat blues of “Tears of Pain” being
just a few.
It’s both a fitting follow-up to Foster’s last release, the
critically-acclaimed The Phenomenal Ruthie Foster, and a standout
showcase for what this soulful, skilled performer’s future will look -
and sound - like.

Ruthie Foster will be performing at InsideOut Gallery in Traverse City
on January 23 at 7:00 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance, $30 at the
door, $35 reserved, $45 VIP, $20 student; tix available at Cuppa Joe,
Sound It Out Records, Oryana, Borders, InsideOut Gallery, and online
at treatickets.com. For more information on Foster, visit
www.ruthiefoster.com and www.bluecornmusic.com.

 
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