Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · 4Play: Klaxons, Gasoline Silveer,...
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4Play: Klaxons, Gasoline Silveer, Manic Street Ptreachers, Vincent Minor

Kristi Kates - January 31st, 2011
Klaxons - Surfing the Void - Polydor
Electro-rock band Klaxons stepped out of Europe and into Los Angeles to record their sophomore set with producer Ross Robinson, and have added even more of an alternative feel to their music via several experimental elements and plenty of dark harmonies. First single “Echoes” presents a zippy beat and chiming guitars, while the title track ventures into unusual vocal territory with high falsettos and electronica fx; “Future Memories” sets the tune to a military beat, and “Flashover” echoes Interpol with its near-disco beat and heavy instrumentals.





Gasoline Silver - Gasoline Silver - Victorian
Lead singer Ron Franklin (who eerily resembles former Battles singer Tyondai Braxton) is at the wheel of this Minnesota band, whose debut disc offers a punk-pop feel that is sprinkled with everything from soulful dance music to electronic folk. They somehow manage to blend all of that into a sound that works, whether they’re putting harmonica into “The Wild Farewell” or throwing the vocals into an echo bin on “It’s All Over But the Crying.” A solid start for a band that already seems to know how to blend the unusual with the catchy.




Manic Street Preachers - Postcards from a Young Man - 101
Serving as the follow up to MSP’s 2009 set, Journal for Plague Lovers, the band’s latest, produced by Dave Eringa and mixed by the skillful Chris Lord Alge, harkens back to much earlier releases with its thick ranges of string work and layered choruses and choir backing vocals. The songs are very quickly memorable, whether they’re slow or quick of tempo, and they’ve invited some interesting guests along, too - Echo’s Ian McCulloch sings along on “Some Kind of Nothingness,” and Manics bassist Nicky Wire contributes vocals to “The Future...” A dense, concise set.



Vincent Minor - Born in the Wrong Era - SSR
Minor’s debut EP is well worth the purchase, even though it’s limited to five of the singer-songwriter’s spiky-smooth tunes. Anchored mostly on piano, this is pop with a lyrical purpose, as Minor sprinkles intriguing expressions and phrases throughout his compositions, even as he’s setting them to ‘70s pop lite foundations that have been pushed into the modern age. “Fanfare” is reminiscent of the early work of the Ben Folds Five, and is perhaps the most catchy song of the set; “Late Night Show” and the title track also hold their own special appeal.
 
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