Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Music · 4Play: Klaxons, Gasoline Silveer,...
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4Play: Klaxons, Gasoline Silveer, Manic Street Ptreachers, Vincent Minor

Kristi Kates - January 31st, 2011
Klaxons - Surfing the Void - Polydor
Electro-rock band Klaxons stepped out of Europe and into Los Angeles to record their sophomore set with producer Ross Robinson, and have added even more of an alternative feel to their music via several experimental elements and plenty of dark harmonies. First single “Echoes” presents a zippy beat and chiming guitars, while the title track ventures into unusual vocal territory with high falsettos and electronica fx; “Future Memories” sets the tune to a military beat, and “Flashover” echoes Interpol with its near-disco beat and heavy instrumentals.





Gasoline Silver - Gasoline Silver - Victorian
Lead singer Ron Franklin (who eerily resembles former Battles singer Tyondai Braxton) is at the wheel of this Minnesota band, whose debut disc offers a punk-pop feel that is sprinkled with everything from soulful dance music to electronic folk. They somehow manage to blend all of that into a sound that works, whether they’re putting harmonica into “The Wild Farewell” or throwing the vocals into an echo bin on “It’s All Over But the Crying.” A solid start for a band that already seems to know how to blend the unusual with the catchy.




Manic Street Preachers - Postcards from a Young Man - 101
Serving as the follow up to MSP’s 2009 set, Journal for Plague Lovers, the band’s latest, produced by Dave Eringa and mixed by the skillful Chris Lord Alge, harkens back to much earlier releases with its thick ranges of string work and layered choruses and choir backing vocals. The songs are very quickly memorable, whether they’re slow or quick of tempo, and they’ve invited some interesting guests along, too - Echo’s Ian McCulloch sings along on “Some Kind of Nothingness,” and Manics bassist Nicky Wire contributes vocals to “The Future...” A dense, concise set.



Vincent Minor - Born in the Wrong Era - SSR
Minor’s debut EP is well worth the purchase, even though it’s limited to five of the singer-songwriter’s spiky-smooth tunes. Anchored mostly on piano, this is pop with a lyrical purpose, as Minor sprinkles intriguing expressions and phrases throughout his compositions, even as he’s setting them to ‘70s pop lite foundations that have been pushed into the modern age. “Fanfare” is reminiscent of the early work of the Ben Folds Five, and is perhaps the most catchy song of the set; “Late Night Show” and the title track also hold their own special appeal.
 
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