Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Music · MilkDrive
. . . .

MilkDrive

Kristi Kates - February 28th, 2011
MilkDrive Shakes Up the Austin Music Scene
By Kristi Kates
The sounds of Austin, Texas resonate in Northern Michigan this weekend
with a band that knows how to fiddle around.
Comprised of Brian Beken, Noah Jeffries, and Dennis Ludiker (all who play
guitar, mandolin, and fiddle) and Matt Mefford on bass, Austin-based
alt-folk band MilkDrive first found its feet in Idaho, the homeland of
main songwriter Jeffries, who grew up playing music with his family’s
bluegrass/gospel band.
Fast-forward to Jeffries’ college days, when he put a touring band
together (36 String Swing) while he toured jazz performance at Boise State
University; a subsequent move to Austin found him both a roommate and a
bandmate in Ludiker, and MilkDrive began to froth.

FOLK HOSPITALITY
The additional band members were found, MilkDrive began writing songs, and
released their debut album, MilkDrive Live ’09, in June of that year, a
fast-paced, dense mix of acoustic strings, diverse rhythms, improv, and
the four bandmates’ innate (and, incidentally, award-winning, in the folk
music scene) skills.
Their listing of musical influences reads a little schizophrenic, perhaps
- Chris Thile and Punch Brothers, Nine Inch Nails, Jean-Luc Ponty, Beck,
The Mars Volta - but that’s probably a big part of why MilkDrive has
formed such an eclectically-interesting sound - each band member brings
something different to the table.

 THE DRIVE LIVE
MilkDrive Live ’09, the album, reveals a good sneak preview of what the
audience can expect at the band’s two upcoming Northern Michigan shows.
“Chabota” sounds like a less-refined, more roughshod Bela Fleck with a
slight Celtic influence, while “Kay’s Tune” is more of a foot-stomper that
would be a perfect fit under one of Blissfest’s summertime festival dance
tents; perhaps why the Blissfest folks selected MilkDrive for their winter
concert series.
“The Call of the Milkmen” echoes the strummed beginning of one of
California modern-rock band PaloAlto’s songs before quickly devolving into
an alt-folk mood piece; and “Random Access” recollects the early days of
the Dave Matthews Band, sans vocals and lyrics, of course.
Some of MilkDrive’s music - as well as their online presence - could use
some sharpening up, as they occasionally fall victim to repetition in
their song arrangements; but overall, their sounds are solid, and either
show is sure to offer an entertaining evening for fans of several genres
of folk music.

Milkdrive will be performing at the Crooked Tree Arts Center in Petoskey
as part of the Blissfest Winter Concert Series on Saturday, March 5 at 8
p.m.. They will also be performing at InsideOut Gallery in Traverse City
on Sunday, March 6 at 8 p.m.. More info on the band may be found at
http://milkdrive.goingplacesmusic.com.


Pushpin artist Eric Daigh makes his point in Chicago

Traverse City-based artist Eric Daigh is finding a national stage for his
remarkable “push pin” work in his first solo exhibition, “We Have One
Conversation,” at a prestigious art gallery in Chicago.
Daigh earned widespread acclaim in 2009 when he won the ArtPrize in Grand
Rapids. His latest work, consisting of large-scale portraits made
entirely of pushpins, will be exhibited at the Carl Hammer Gallery Feb. 25
– April 9. The gallery is located at 740 N. Wells Street, Chicago.
Mayor Richard M. Daley sat for a portrait by Daigh earlier this month.
That piece along with 10 others will be exhibited.
Daigh holds the Guinness Book of World Records “Largest Pushpin Mosaic”
record, and also his work has been featured on CBS Sunday Morning. From a
distance the works look like low-resolution photos, but upon moving closer
a viewer sees the 27,000 pins needed to complete a six-foot by four-foot
piece. All told, the show in Chicago will contain 209,507 pushpins.
“It’s been a very illuminating year,” says Daigh. “I intend to be one of
the artists of my generation that matters, and that’s meant growth in
every aspect of my approach.”
Check out http://daigh.com for more on Eric’s art.

 
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