Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Other Opinions · Seniors need to pitch in...
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Seniors need to pitch in too 4/4/11

Michael Estes - April 4th, 2011
Seniors need to pitch in too
By Michael Estes
A few Lansing demonstrators hustled together by AARP and unhappy union
members to create problems at the capital don’t constitute the majority
thinking of Michigan voters and especially not seniors.
Instead of wasting a sunny spring Michigan afternoon, most seniors were
busy gainfully employed, assisting those in need or enjoying the company
of their friends and family in their retirements. As a senior I’m offended
by the misinformation from the media about the Governor’s tax proposal.
It’s equally sad to hear the pathetic response by wimp Legislators fearful
for their re-election all because some AARP members and some union
employees can support nothing other than their selfish interests. This
mentality is doing nothing to move Michigan forward.
Let’s get real. The Snyder proposal to tax pensions won’t impact the poor.
Seniors will pay the same tax rate that their 21-year-old grandchildren
pay.
Young people and all employed persons pay a percentage of their incomes to
the State; so why should seniors constitute a privileged tax class?
The proposed changes will tax pensions which are income that has never
been taxed just like wages, dividends and interest and other forms of
income. Those seniors with two Social Security checks, two or more
pensions, plus investment income will definitely pay more in Michigan
taxes. They rightfully should. These same pension benefits are already
taxed by Uncle Sam and most states.
Additionally, seniors receive special tax benefits for their age from both
the State and the Federal government that are unavailable to our youth and
other workers.
My father’s legacy was to leave me a world better than the one he was born
into, to pay his debts and to not burden me with his liabilities. My
generation of seniors is on a path of leaving our offspring with their
monumental debts and little opportunity for the young to pay those debts.
The national debt is $14 trillion and growing. In Michigan, to pay
unemployment benefits, we’ve borrowed $3.4 billion from the fed without a
plan for repayment. Presently, 67 cities in Michigan are on the watch
list of serious financial trouble with the Treasury. Meanwhile, 90% of
governmental pension plans are underfunded, meaning billions are owed in
the future. Flint needs $20 million just to stay afloat and it’s unlikely
that public education will survive in Detroit. Unemployment rates are
highest for our youngest citizens, yet we expect them to pay our debts.
Additionally with our support, our young assumed large amounts of their
own debt to finance their college educations with little chance of
recouping that expenditure.
Governor Snyder’s tax package is not without pain, but it’s exactly what
Michigan needs. We need to pay as we go and we can no longer apply
Band-aids to difficult financial decisions. We need to create a business
environment and a taxation policy in Michigan that encourages new hiring.
That’s the only way that the youth of Michigan can pay their education
liabilities, purchase the houses we will one day wish to sell, and
otherwise contribute to our common good. It’s time for my fellow seniors
to tune out the media fear-mongering and the rants of Lansing protesters
and make their fair share contribution to a solution for Michigan.
Do it for your grandchildren and for those who are yet to come!

Michael Estes is a former mayor of Traverse City.

 
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