Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Music · Jesse Winchester 4/4/11
. . . .

Jesse Winchester 4/4/11

Kristi Kates - April 4th, 2011
Jesse Winchester: 40 Years of Songs
By Kristi Kates
 When asked what the audience can look forward to at his upcoming City
Opera House show in Traverse City, singer-songwriter Jesse Winchester is
either the humblest of performers, or merely the soul of brevity.
“(It’ll be) me, playing my guitar and singing. Doesn’t sound like much,
does it?” he says.
But his vocals and guitar are precisely what people show up to hear.
He started getting recognition for his distinctive style around 1968; by
1970, his recordings were getting recognized, as were those of some of his
songs by several of his famous peers.
Winchester’s 40 years’ worth of songs have been reinterpreted, revamped,
and re-recorded by a number of names you’re sure to recognize, including
the likes of Elvis Costello, Jimmy Buffett, Reba McEntire, Patti Page, and
Joan Baez.
He’s known for capturing detailed stories and character/situation studies
in his songs, from “Biloxi” to “Yankee Lady,” “Brand New Tennessee Waltz”
to “Payday.” His homage to pot, “Twigs and Seeds” was a cult hit with
folkies in the mid-’70s, as was “Songbird,” covered by Emmy Lou Harris.
Winchester’s own favorite picks among covers of his songs are delivered
concisely.
“I like Wilson Pickett’s version of “Isn’t That So?” and Ed Bruce’s
version of “Evil Angel,” he declares.
 
BACK IN THE U.S.A.
Born in Louisiana, raised in Mississippi and Tennessee, and finding
himself in college in Massachusetts (he graduated in the late ‘60s),
Winchester famously resisted the draft during the Vietnam War by moving to
Canada. He joined a local band in his new homeland of Quebec, started
writing songs that he’d perform as a solo artist, and began recording in
1970 with his eponymous debut album. He became a Canadian citizen in 1973.
Would he have made the the same choice today, under the current president,
to avoid the draft?
“I don’t know,” he demurs, “but whatever government is in place doesn’t
have much to do with it. I moved to Canada because I did not believe in
the war in Vietnam.”
Winchester’s career was affected by his choice, to some degree. As he
wasn’t able to tour in the United States until amnesty had been given to
draft resisters in the late ‘70s. He became known more for his songwriting
than for his performing, hence his songs being discovered and recorded by
other artists.
Now living in the U.S. once again, Winchester - a resident of Virginia -
has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from ASCAP (The American Society
of Composers, Artists, and Publishers), and released a brand new album
called Love Filling Station in 2009, a set seasoned with bluegrass,
country, and folk influences, nine new originals and three covers in all.
Today, he’s continuing to write and perform, which he says he’ll be
focusing on for this spring, summer, and beyond.
“I’m writing another record between shows,” he says, “that’s pretty much
my plan for spring and summer. Fall and winter, too.”

Jesse Winchester (with special guest NEeMA) will be appearing at the City
Opera House on Saturday, April 9 at 8 p.m. Tickets $25/$15 at
cityoperahouse.org, or by telephoning 231-941-8082.


 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close