Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Jesse Winchester 4/4/11
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Jesse Winchester 4/4/11

Kristi Kates - April 4th, 2011
Jesse Winchester: 40 Years of Songs
By Kristi Kates
 When asked what the audience can look forward to at his upcoming City
Opera House show in Traverse City, singer-songwriter Jesse Winchester is
either the humblest of performers, or merely the soul of brevity.
“(It’ll be) me, playing my guitar and singing. Doesn’t sound like much,
does it?” he says.
But his vocals and guitar are precisely what people show up to hear.
He started getting recognition for his distinctive style around 1968; by
1970, his recordings were getting recognized, as were those of some of his
songs by several of his famous peers.
Winchester’s 40 years’ worth of songs have been reinterpreted, revamped,
and re-recorded by a number of names you’re sure to recognize, including
the likes of Elvis Costello, Jimmy Buffett, Reba McEntire, Patti Page, and
Joan Baez.
He’s known for capturing detailed stories and character/situation studies
in his songs, from “Biloxi” to “Yankee Lady,” “Brand New Tennessee Waltz”
to “Payday.” His homage to pot, “Twigs and Seeds” was a cult hit with
folkies in the mid-’70s, as was “Songbird,” covered by Emmy Lou Harris.
Winchester’s own favorite picks among covers of his songs are delivered
concisely.
“I like Wilson Pickett’s version of “Isn’t That So?” and Ed Bruce’s
version of “Evil Angel,” he declares.
 
BACK IN THE U.S.A.
Born in Louisiana, raised in Mississippi and Tennessee, and finding
himself in college in Massachusetts (he graduated in the late ‘60s),
Winchester famously resisted the draft during the Vietnam War by moving to
Canada. He joined a local band in his new homeland of Quebec, started
writing songs that he’d perform as a solo artist, and began recording in
1970 with his eponymous debut album. He became a Canadian citizen in 1973.
Would he have made the the same choice today, under the current president,
to avoid the draft?
“I don’t know,” he demurs, “but whatever government is in place doesn’t
have much to do with it. I moved to Canada because I did not believe in
the war in Vietnam.”
Winchester’s career was affected by his choice, to some degree. As he
wasn’t able to tour in the United States until amnesty had been given to
draft resisters in the late ‘70s. He became known more for his songwriting
than for his performing, hence his songs being discovered and recorded by
other artists.
Now living in the U.S. once again, Winchester - a resident of Virginia -
has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from ASCAP (The American Society
of Composers, Artists, and Publishers), and released a brand new album
called Love Filling Station in 2009, a set seasoned with bluegrass,
country, and folk influences, nine new originals and three covers in all.
Today, he’s continuing to write and perform, which he says he’ll be
focusing on for this spring, summer, and beyond.
“I’m writing another record between shows,” he says, “that’s pretty much
my plan for spring and summer. Fall and winter, too.”

Jesse Winchester (with special guest NEeMA) will be appearing at the City
Opera House on Saturday, April 9 at 8 p.m. Tickets $25/$15 at
cityoperahouse.org, or by telephoning 231-941-8082.


 
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