Letters

Letters 08-24-2015

Bush And Blame Jeb Bush strikes again. Understand that Bush III represents the nearly extinct, compassionate-conservative, moderate wing of the Republican party...

No More State Theatre I was quite surprised and disgusted by an article I saw in last week’s edition. On pages 18 and 19 was an article about how the State Theatre downtown let some homosexual couple get married there...

GMOs Unsustainable Steve Tuttle’s column on GMOs was both uninformed and off the mark. Genetic engineering will not feed the world like Tuttle claims. However, GMOs do have the potential to starve us because they are unsustainable...

A Pin Drop Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 to a group of Democrats in Charlevoix, an all-white, seemingly middle class, well-educated audience, half of whom were female...

A Slippery Slope Most of us would agree that an appropriate suggestion to a physician who refuses to provide a blood transfusion to a dying patient because of the doctor’s religious views would be, “Please doctor, change your profession as a less selfish means of protecting your religious freedom.”

Stabilize Our Climate Climate scientists have been saying that in order to stabilize the climate, we need to limit global warming to less than two degrees. Renewables other than hydropower provide less than 3 percent of the world energy. In order to achieve the two degree scenario, the world needs to generate 11 times more wind power by 2050, and 36 times more solar power. It will require a big helping of new nuclear power, too...

Harm From GMOs I usually agree with the well-reasoned opinions expressed in Stephen Tuttle’s columns but I must challenge his assertions concerning GMO foods. As many proponents of GMOs do, Mr. Tuttle conveniently ignores the basic fact that GMO corn, soybeans and other crops have been engineered to withstand massive quantities of herbicides. This strategy is designed to maximize profits for chemical companies, such as Monsanto. The use of copious quantities of herbicides, including glyphosates, is losing its effectiveness and the producers of these poisons are promoting the use of increasingly dangerous substances to achieve the same results...

Home · Articles · News · Music · 4Play:Badly Drawn Boy, The Apples...
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4Play:Badly Drawn Boy, The Apples in Stereo, Eels, Autumn Defense 4/4/11

Kristi Kates - April 4th, 2011
Badly Drawn Boy - It’s What I’m Thinking: Part One - The End Records
Chock-full of emotional filling and dusted with instrumental sugar, Badly Drawn Boy’s latest - like so many of his best albums - is another musical treat that’s light enough to not be overwhelming, but still a rewarding and smart listen. His personal lyrics tell the stories, while the melodies remain as catchy as always, right from the temperate opener (“In Safe Hands”) to the reflective “What Tomorrow Brings,” the simple but effortlessly pretty balladry of “Saw You Walk Away” and “The Electric,” and onward to the slightly more musically-adventurous “A Pure Accident” and “This Beautiful Idea.” It’s fairly apparent that most of the album is inspired by relationships - but hopefully something else he’s thinking about is how to make more great music like this.


The Apples in Stereo - Travellers in Space and Time - Yep Roc
Serving as the successor to their much-lauded New Magnetic Wonder album, The Apples in Stereo push forward with more of their uber-catchy refrains and witty wordplay. A slightly more danceable feel is woven through this set, with disco beats enhancing tracks like “Hey Elevator” and the appropriately-dubbed “Dance Floor,” while songs like “Dignified Dignitary” and “No Vacation” keep those foot-friendly rhythms while blending back in the Apples’ appealing quirkiness, from their inclusion of vocoders and off-kilter harmonies to their slightly goofy way of writing lyrics that tell universal tales in a humorous way, albeit one that’s blended with alien synths and heavy rock guitars.



Eels - Tomorrow Morning - E Works
With more electronica and definitively anchoring bass lines than prior efforts, Eels frontman E (aka Mark Everett) throws out the songs on his latest effort like confetti, completing what’s being considered a concept trio of albums that began in 2009. With carefully-structured arrangements showcasing Everett’s personal, often humorous lyric stylings, this is a more hopeful album than the two prior, beginning with the instrumental opener “In Gratitude of This Magnificence” setting the tone. “What I Have to Offer” is a simple man’s love song, quickly followed by a 180, mood-wise, with “This is Where It Gets Good,” with its funky beat and synth work; and “Mystery of Life” is a standout with its obvious Beach Boys-influenced harmonies.



Autumn Defense - Once Around - Yep Roc
You might be familiar with at least two of the members of this band, namely Pat Sansone and John Stirratt, who are also bandmates in another little indie band called... Wilco. The Autumn Defense has actually been a side project of the friends for about the past 10 years, and offers both some similarities to Wilco’s sound and some fresh infusions that are all Autumn Defense’s own. The production is sharp, the arrangements bedecked with strings and plenty of backing vocals, and the songs themselves, while not as immediately catchy as Wilco’s tunes, do grow on you, especially tracks like “Tell Me What You Want,” “Don’t Know,” “The Rift,” and “There Will Always Be a Way.”
 
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