Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Horse sense
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Horse sense

Kristi Kates - May 2nd, 2011
Horse Sense: Horses become teachers at Equine Journey
By Kristi Kates
Boyne Spas are becoming known in Northern Michigan for offering “spa experiences” far beyond that which might be expected. While facials, hair treatments, mud baths, and the like are great pursuits for relaxation, Boyne Spa’s extra workshops have so far included, among others, trapeze, healing, art, and drum circle events, all of which seek to take participants well past the typical.
“Boyne Spas are the complete destination for body, mind, and spirit,” says Camryn Handler, spa director from the Spa at The Inn at Bay Harbor. “We focus not only on great treatments in our spas but also on creating new experiences in our lives to learn and grow with our spa weekends and retreats.”
The latest experience from Boyne Spas is called the Equine Journey, which uses interactive exercises to help people learn by connecting with animals, in this case, horses.
“Experiential learning is learning by doing,” says program instructor Maryellen Werstine. “Horses are highly sensitive and intuitive animals. They are masters of the art of nonverbal communication and tend to mirror and reflect the emotions and body language of those around them. A person can gain so much insight for themselves by interacting with them. We help facilitate this experience for our participants and help interpret the information as useful tools in everyday life.”
All of the horse activities are done in a safe manner, on the ground, at the Bay Harbor Equestrian Club, “the perfect location to host the Equine Journey,” Handler says.

BONDING MOMENTS
Handler, who first heard about the program from Werstine, says she was initially invited to a workshop to see what it was all about - even though she had a few apprehensions, and wasn’t sure what to expect.
“I honestly was a little afraid of horses,” Handler says, “but the workshop was amazing. Not only was I standing side-by-side to an extremely beautiful and large animal, but I was beginning to realize and learn things about myself; how I approach things, how I can create barriers, how my intention can shape things, and how great it feels to move these and create success. I was hooked.”
Another interesting element is that the horses themselves are actually the “leaders” of these special events through an approach that Equine Journey calls “FEEL.”

HELP FROM HORSES
“Feel stands for ‘Facilitated Equine Experiential Learning,” Erin Halloran, another of Equine Journey’s Program Instructors, says. “First and foremost, it broadens nonverbal awareness. ‘Facilitated Equine’ simply means that horses are our teachers and facilitators. ‘Experiential learning’ refers to a type of learning that is a ‘here and now’ experience.”
Halloran says that each experience generally varies greatly for participants, but that in the end, most receive unbiased information about themselves while interacting with the horses.
“Horses help people learn about their nonverbal cues, unconscious behavior patterns, and the emotional intent of their words and actions,” she says.
“Participants will learn more about the magic of horses,” Werstine continues, “and through their direct experience, they can discover the effectiveness of their body language, gain personal awareness, strengthen their intuition, change old behavioral patterns, learn to set boundaries, and begin to start using emotion as information.”

INSTANT FEEDBACK
Horses use their literal “horse sense” to help their human counterparts.
“The most rewarding thing about working with the horses is honest and instant feedback from them,” Halloran says. “Horses teach us how to live in the present moment. The most challenging aspect is usually getting people to let go of previously learned behavior patterns that have prevented them from moving forward in the past. But here, each person can connect with the horse to receive information specifically for them.
“Most people have an epiphany of things they did not realize about themselves,” Werstine continues, “and then have an opportunity to work on it at our workshops - everyone will learn something they can take into the ‘real world.’ People may not even know what they need until they are in that moment.
“We all want to live in harmony, but it does not happen overnight,” she adds. “Long-lasting change arrives one step at a time, and requires continuation and practice to incorporate the new thoughts and ideas into your life as second nature. Our goal is to help the horses help people to get there a little quicker.”

Equine Journey’s upcoming workshop dates at the Bay Harbor Equestrian Club will be May 14, June 25, September 3, and October 1. Each workshop is limited to a maximum of 8 participants, so early signup is recommended. See www.innatbayharbor.com/Spa/equineJourney.html, or phone 231-439-4046.
 
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