Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · China Mom: Sarah Johnson
. . . .

China Mom: Sarah Johnson

Erin Crowell - May 2nd, 2011
China mom: Sarah Johnson brings teaching experience and two daughters to the Middle Kingdom
By Erin Crowell
While Leelanau County resident Sarah Johnson has lived over 30 years in a
home that is “off-grid” (meaning self-sufficiency without reliance on a
public utility), the mother of three is finding a whole new meaning for
the term.
The Pathfinder School teacher is currently on a three-month sabbatical
teaching English in the very unwesternized portion of Central China in a
city called Yichang.
Although the city’s population swells at around 3.5 million, Johnson says
she’s never felt more disconnected to the rest of the world.
“A lot of things are blocked,” she says of internet sites such as Google
and news outlets like NPR. “But there are ways to circumnavigate,” she
adds, describing a way she can use one site to access another.

A FAMILY AFFAIR
Johnson approached Pathfinder headmaster Karl Sikkenga earlier this winter
about the opportunity to teach at Three Gorges University.
“Karl had mentioned a sabbatical program in the near future, but I don’t
think he was planning on doing it quite so soon,” Johnson laughs.
When she approached her family about the endeavor, Johnson says there were
mixed feelings.
“I just kind of blurted out that there was a teaching gig available and I
wanted to do it,” Johnson recalls. “‘Are you nuts?’ was the initial
reaction. My husband said, ‘well, if that’s what you want, do it.’”
With the support from her family, Johnson left at the end of February,
taking her youngest daughter Norah, 11, with her.
“She’s been a great travel partner,” Johnson says. “She’s very open and
curious, which is great. I think the trip has created a certain
flexibility that she didn’t have innately. She’s a very analytical kid,
looking at situations instead of getting emotional about them. She likes
to ask ‘why?’ and ‘what’s the tradition behind this?’”
Five weeks ago, second eldest daughter Flannery joined her mother and
sister, followed by Johnson’s husband, Bob Babich, three weeks later.

CULTURAL INFLUENCE
The cultural differences are always evident, and appear even in the
classroom.
“This is from a very limited perspective, as I’ve only been here for a few
months, but I have noticed the standards here are very different in terms
of curriculum. The teacher decides whatever they would like to teach for
the semester. Not everyone has the same experience.
“In the U.S., you take Comp 101 where you focus on argumentative and
descriptive writing. Here, they really push their middle and high school
students in anticipation of university. By the time they get here, kids
kind of kick back.”
Johnson says it’s not uncommon for only half the class to show up for an
exam.
Beyond the classroom, cultural differences happen everyday for Johnson and
her family.
“When we go downtown, we’re the only Western-looking people on the street.
People will giggle and take photos. By the end of the day, we’ll have
gathered a small parade,” she laughs.
Johnson says the experience has also opened her children’s eyes, a goal of
both parents.
“We’ve always been about shifting their paradigm,” she adds. “I think that
giving your kids the global perspective as far as how people live is a
really big gift. They see a lot of things here.”
For Flannery, a 16-year-old student at Leland High School, the experience
has allowed her to consider her own endeavors.
“Coming to China and seeing all the pollution, it makes me want to study
environmental issues,” she says.
When it comes to mom, Flannery says she is proud.
“She’s definitely an inspiration to me. I know she’s really glad she took
this opportunity and that is absolutely amazing when she can experience it
and all the challenges that come with it.”

To follow Sarah Johnson’s experience in China, visit her blog at
http://sarahjohnsonportfolio.webs.com.


 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close