Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · 4Play: The Cars, Stevie Nicks,...
. . . .

4Play: The Cars, Stevie Nicks, Matthew Morrison, Jennifer Lopez

Kristi Kates - May 9th, 2011
The Cars - Move Like This - Hear Music
Back after nearly a quarter-century out of the loop as a band, ‘80s hipsters The Cars reconfigure their jittery, poppy brand of new wave into a slightly more modernized set that’s still just retro enough to bring back their old fans while most likely snagging a few new ones, as well. The synths, jagged guitars, and distinctive Ric Ocasek vocals are all present and ready to be called to order within a series of well-constructed pop songs reminiscent of Devo, Talking Heads, and, well, The Cars of yesteryear. “Sad Song” debuts first with its accompanying Rene-Magritte-meets-the-’80s video; production by Jacknife Lee adds consistancy.
 


Stevie Nicks - In Your Dreams - Reprise
Written and tracked at Nicks’ own home in L.A. with co-production by Alanis Morrisette cohort Glen Ballard and Eurythmic Dave Stewart, Nicks’ latest is notable in that her voice and songwriting are perhaps the only two consistent elements that pull all of these tracks together to make a recognizable Stevie Nicks album. It’s interesting and admirable that at this point in her career, Nicks chose to do quite a bit of sound experimenting, and it works for the most part, from the synths on “Everybody Loves You” to the wall of guitars on “Ghosts Are Gone,” the string-graced “Italian Summer,” and the Americana-seasoned “Cheaper Than Free.”
 


Matthew Morrison - Matthew Morrison - Island
Gleeksters will recognize the charismatic Morrison from his role as teacher Will on the hugely popular TV series Glee. Others, however, may not find this album compelling enough to further seek out the actor/singer (Morrison actually had a ton of Broadway experience before being cast on the television show.) While Morrison has a pleasant enough singing voice, and collaborated with the likes of producer Espionage and guest performers Gwyneth Paltrow and Elton John, his own performances are somewhat tepid; lead single “Summer Rain” sets the vanilla tone by being reminiscent of a late-night infomercial “Romantic Pop Hits” album.
 

Jennifer Lopez - Love? - Island
J-Lo may be a multi-tasking performer, with her singing, acting, producer, fashionista, and American Idol judge roles all woven together; but perhaps she’s trying to focus on too many things at once to the detriment of some. Lopez’ latest album, while sure to be a sensation at the clubs, simply doesn’t have enough weight to make much of an impression elsewhere, nor are the tracks forward enough to sit beside more modern artists, and even the heavy production can’t disguise her thin voice. “On the Floor” and “Hypnotico” are, again, at least suitable for the dance floor, but the rest are tracks that will likely be forgotten a year from now.
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close