Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Char Brickel
. . . .

Char Brickel

Al Parker - May 23rd, 2011
It’s easy to see that artist Char Bickel is serious when it comes to joy and fun.
“It’s good to keep in touch with that childhood joy,” advises the smiling Northport resident who creates evocative, handsome shadow boxes of painted silk and cotton fabric that is painstakingly cut and glued. “I loved making art as a kid and I still do.”  
Paying homage to collage, Bickel’s works draw their inspiration from the nature that surrounds her in Leelanau County and most of her works include images of animals – rabbits, fish, birds, and most noticeably, bears. In fact, her haunting image of a Juggling Bear has become synonymous with her work, appearing in a variety of her shadow boxes.
“There’s something about the shape of bears,” she says. “I’ve been doing the Juggling Bear since 1992. It’s sort of a logo for me now. To me, it reflects that you should handle parts of life in balance and joyfully.” 
Bickel’s shadow boxes begin simply with white silk that is screen printed with splashes of color. Then she cuts and glues the silk into images as simple and subtle as bears flying kites or ponies romping on a beach. The scenes may seem other-worldly, yet are rooted in the familiar. Take a closer look and you’ll see sturdy stitching linking a stone to the beach or fixing the moon in the sky.
“I like adding detail,” she says. “I like to start with a strong image first, then see something else and something else, adding details.”

AN EDUCATION
Bickel grew up near the shores of Lake Michigan in Muskegon and realized early on that art would play a major role in her life. After graduating from the University of Michigan with a fine arts degree in painting, she earned her MFA in fibers from the Cranbrook Academy of Art.
Before Bickel and her husband Steve Wetherbee moved to Northport in 1991, she taught art classes at Lansing Community College, The Center for Creative Studies, and Wayne State University. A year later, she opened Zoon Gallery (later Char Bickel Gallery) which highlighted her works in Northport for a decade before closing in 2002.
With an interest in young artists, Bickel has also taught in both Northport and Suttons Bay public schools.
She creates her shadow boxes in a studio at her circa-1890 white farmhouse atop a hill. It’s filled with all varieties of her creativity, plus the works of many of her friends and contemporary artists. On display are pieces by Angela Saxon, Sue Brightheart, Steve Toornman, Meredith Krell, Charla Khanna, Chris Roberts-Antieau, Doug Racich, Melanie Steffes and others.
Over the years, Bickel’s pieces have been displayed in dozens of galleries nationwide and the focus of several solo exhibitions, including at the Slusser Gallery at the U-M and the Ann Arbor Art Association. Many private and corporate collections include her creative works. Locally, she’s been featured at Kejara’s Bridge in Lake Leelanau and Parallel Arts in Northport.
On June 24, she’ll be the featured artist for the annual Suttons Bay Artwalk. 

SHADOW BOXES
Fans of Bickel’s work will want to be aware of her new series of 10x10-inch shadow boxes that she’ll be displaying this summer. Each will focus on a single nature image – usually a fish, bird, rabbit, frog, horse, bear or other creature. 
She’s also been busy collecting sand samples from a variety of northern Michigan beaches and plans to include tiny bottles of different sands in upcoming works.
“Art is food for the soul,” explains Bickel. “When you contemplate art, you mirror the artist’s experience; you are in touch with the universal creative imagination that breathed life into the picture. The animals and mysterious ladies who visit my pictures have also visited my dreams. They are wise, shy presences whom I try to depict in a respectful, poetic way, using a satisfying yin/yang combination of collage and painting.”
That poetic chord resonates with Sue Ann Round, owner of the Michigan Artists Gallery where 40 to 50 of Bickel’s works are always on display. 
“I would definitely say she’s a poet,” offers Round. “It’s very common for her to write a little something on the back of a piece that often brings someone to tears.”
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close