Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

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JFK, Ronald Reagan and Hope

Stephen Tuttle - February 14th, 2011
JFK, Ronald Reagan and Hope
The two modern ex-presidents with the most mystique both marked milestones
January was the 50th anniversary of President John Kennedy’s inauguration. And February would have been Ronald Reagan’s 100th birthday. Ironically, there were marked similarities between the dashing young liberal from Massachusetts and the dashing old conservative from California.
There is little debate that Kennedy was a different kind of president than what the country had been used to prior to 1960. Young, attractive, vibrant and with an even younger, beautiful wife he made everyone feel a little more optimistic about the future.
We liked him and wanted him to succeed.
He was strong during the Cuban missile crisis, forcing the Soviets to remove offensive missiles with nuclear capabilities from Cuba. It was a time of tension far beyond anything we’re now experiencing – the world’s two atomic super powers in a face-to-face showdown that could have ended in a nuclear holocaust. (It was serious enough that it was the first time I remember our house having television on during dinner. Regrettably, the second time was only a couple years later when we followed, with horror, the news of Kennedy’s murder in Dallas.)
Kennedy also inspired us to reach the moon and provided the impetus that led to the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts.
But he badly bungled the Bay of Pigs invasion, a horribly amateur operation
designed to overthrow Fidel Castro. Our
invaders were all either captured or killed and the fiasco set the groundwork for what has become a half-century long policy of foolishness toward Cuba.
Worse, he started the escalations of our role in Vietnam. The early 60s were our best chance to gracefully and honorably bow out of Southeast Asia and save several hundred billion dollars and more than 50,000 lives. Alas, Kennedy bought into the now
discredited “domino theory” that held if South Vietnam fell, all of Southeast Asia would become Communist, falling like so many dominoes.
We also learned, after the fact, that Kennedy was a world-class philanderer and, far from being vigorous and active, had a crippling back injury he received in World War II and suffered from a debilitating case of Grave’s disease.
To be fair, Kennedy had only 1,000 days of presidency, not enough time to be either fully successful or a failure. That we still talk of Camelot and the Kennedy presidency is testament to his friends and family and their ability to perpetuate the myth and mystique. And we cling to an unrealistic image because, at least in part, he was taken from us so harshly and suddenly.
Ronald Reagan, of course, had eight full years to enact his vision for America.
As effective as the Kennedy clan and their friends have been in keeping the Kennedy aura alive and well, Reagan’s supporters have been better. They’re still trying to make sure there is some kind of Reagan monument in every county in the country. Some haven’t given up on their notion that Reagan deserves a place on Mount
Rushmore. Never mind that there’s no room.
Reagan, much like Kennedy, brought hope and optimism to the country. In
Reagan’s case, that was especially important to a country that had been battered for nearly a decade. We’d gone through
Watergate, the Iranian hostage mess was still in play, and we had been mired in an economy with double-digit inflation and brutal interest rates. Gas prices skyrocketed and the OPEC nations decided it would be fun to punish us by exporting less so we had long, long lines at the gas pumps and even some gas rationing. Things were not so good.
Then along comes
Ronald Reagan, and his exquisite campaign commercials, telling us it was
“morning in America”.
This was to be a new brand of conservative leadership that would restore our military, reduce the size of the government, lower taxes and still be tough on the Soviet Union. Some of his supporters still talk as if he actually did all those things.
President Reagan did, in fact, become a very tough adversary for the Soviets. He wasn’t much of a negotiator but his anti-Soviet rhetoric was dynamic. His speech in Berlin, demanding that Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev “tear down this wall” was a classic. And he was willing to spend and spend and spend on the military, including the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), popularly known as the Star Wars missile defense system. Gorbachev has said
publicly it was Reagan’s willingness to spend freely on the military that ultimately did them in. They simply could not keep pace given the moribund reality of their perpetually failing Socialist economy.
Aside from that, Reagan wasn’t much of a conservative at all.
Under Reagan, our annual deficits increased, our national debt tripled and the federal government grew even more bloated in both size and cost. Supply side economics was a bust and after an initial tax cut, Reagan raised taxes an astonishing 11 times. That’s an unbelievably bad record for a conservative icon and exactly the kind of big taxes, big spending and big government those who now call themselves conservatives so despise.
Then there was the Iran/Contra mess, an illegal and farcical diversion of funds and weapons to the Nicaraguan contras that did not help us with Iran, did not lead to the immediate defeat of the sandanistas and consumed much of Reagan’s second term.
But never mind their failings and flaws. We liked John Kennedy and Ronald Reagan and it seemed they liked us. They made us feel better about our country and become more optimistic about our future. Their
acolytes make sure we remember.
We honor them now for what they symbolized more than for what they actually accomplished, and that’s all right. Hope,
despite what some current politicians think, is a good thing and we fondly remember those leaders who bring it to us.
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