Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Lewis Black
. . . .

Lewis Black

Kristi Kates - February 14th, 2011
Lewis Black’s Black Comedy
By Kristi Kates
He counts among his fans George Carlin and the recently-retired Larry King. His stature onstage is that of beckoning aggression - even as you might be a little taken aback by his in-your-face performance style, you can’t help but admire his steadfast determination to state his opinions on, well, pretty much anything and everything.
And he’s perhaps one of the best known stand up comedians performing today, venting in a comedic - and loud - fashion about everything from business to politics to pop culture.
As Lewis Black’s press release explains, “Lewis yells so his audiences don’t have to.”

EARLY OUTPUT
Born in Washington D.C. (perhaps the catalyst for such comedic statements of Black’s such as “Republicans are a party with bad ideas, and Democrats are a party with no ideas”) and raised in Maryland, Black’s disgruntled personality surfaced early on. A colicky child who was easily irritated, he found an outlet in his early teens through the theater; he saw his first play at the age of 12, and decided to pursue a career in drama, acquiring degrees from the University of North Carolina and Yale Drama School. While at UNC, he first ventured into standup comedy performing, and found yet another productive venue for his skills... and his ongoing need to complain.
From North Carolina, it was on to New York City, where Black became a playwright-in-residence, overseeing over a thousand plays that took place on the stage of the West Bank Cafe’s Theater, including those by West Wing creator Aaron Sorkin and American Beauty writer Alan Ball in addition to his own plays.
But comedy kept calling.

STANDING AND RANTING
By the late ‘80s, Black had left the theater scene for the most part, and had decided to pursue stand up comedy full-time. By the mid-’90s, his friend, Lizz Winstead, called upon Black to create a weekly segment for Comedy Central’s The Daily Show. The segment was right up Black’s alley, as it was basically three minutes of him ranting and raving about whatever was currently annoying him - and it became one of the most popular segments on the show.
Connections are everything in the entertainment business - and with Black’s segment on The Daily Show a success, it wasn’t long before he was offered his own Comedy Central specials and series - by 2001, he’d won Best Male Stand Up at the American Comedy Awards, and had snagged a record deal with Stand Up Records, which released his first CD in 2000. Six more CDs would follow, as would specials on HBO, a spot in the acclaimed Comic Relief special, appearances on Larry King, Conan O’Brian, David Letterman, and Keith Olbermann, and a busy touring schedule.
Whew. Lewis Black had definitely arrived.

CHARITY IN COMEDY
With all of that going on, you’d think Black wouldn’t have time for much else. but he keeps writing, and has dabbled in acting, as well, taking on roles alongside Robin Williams in Man of the Year and in the comedy film Accepted, among others.
And he’s balancing out his curmudgeonliness with his dedication to a number of charity organizations, including the 52nd Street Project, the Ron Black Memorial Scholarship Fund, fundraising for the Rusty Magee Clinic, and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; he supports our military personnel (having become involved with the USO to tour the Middle East with Robin Williams), and is committed to ending gun violence. Returning full circle to UNC, he’s developing the school’s Carolina Comedy Festival to provide workshops and lectures for beginning writers, performers, and comics, giving back to one of the schools that helped him get his own start.
How he does all of this while still performing over 200 nights a year across the world remains a mystery. But Northern Michigan residents will get a chance to see this multi-faceted performer in his comedy role with his upcoming show at the Traverse City Opera House, where the show will contain “adult language and humor” - and plenty of Black’s trademark views of the world.

Comedian Lewis Black will be bringing his comedy tour to the City Opera House in Traverse City on February 18 at 8:00 p.m. Tickets $55/$40. For tix and more info, visit www.cityoperahouse.org, or telephone 231-941-8082.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close