Letters

Letters 09-15-2014

Stop The Games On Campus

Four head coaches – two at U of M and two at MSU – get a total of $13 million of your taxpayer dollars each year. Their staffs get another $11 million...

The Truth About Fatbikes

While we appreciate the fatbike trail coverage, the quote from the article below is exactly what we demonstrated not to be true in most cases last season...

Man Has Environmental Responsibility

I tend to agree with Thomas Kachadurian (“Playing God,” Sept. 8) that we should not interfere with the power of nature by deciding what is “native” and what is not. Man usually does what is better for man (or so we believe), hence the survival and population growth of our species...

The Bush & Obama Facts

Don Turner’s letter to the editor on 8/25/14 stated that there has never been a more corrupt, dishonest, etc. set of politicians in the White House. He states no facts, but here are a few...

Ban Pesticides

I grew up downstate in a neighborhood without pesticides. I was always very healthy. Living here, I have become ill. So I did my research and found out a lot about these poison agents called pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, chemical fertilizers, etc) that are being spread throughout this community, accumulating in our air, water and soil...

Respect for Presidents?

Recently we read the Letter to the Editor that encouraged us to stop characterizing President Obama as anything other than an upstanding, moral, inspiring “first Black President”. The author would have us think that the rancor in the press, media and public is misguided. And, believe it or not, this rancor is a “glaring exception to … unwritten patriotic rule” of historically supporting all previous presidents...


Home · Articles · News · Features · Clearing the air: Medical...
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Clearing the air: Medical marijuana workshop for employers

Rick Coates - February 21st, 2011
Clearing the Air: Medical Marijuana Workshop For Employers
By Rick Coates
While the State of Michigan continues to be in somewhat of a “cloud of
smoke” over the Medical Marijuana Act of 2008, many employers have asked
where they stand legally on the issue with their employees who might have
medical marijuana cards. The Northwest Michigan Council of Governments
hopes to shed some light for employers this Wednesday, February 23, with a
workshop, “Medical Marijuana - The Law and How it Impacts Your Business &
Employees” from 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. at the Great Wolf Lodge in Traverse City.
The panelists include Thomas S. Gilbert, an attorney and former judge who
is with Touchstone Intervention & Prevention Specialists in TC; Dr. Darryl
Lesoski, medical director of the Occupational Health & Medicine Department
at Munson Healthcare; and Grand Rapids attorney Donald Lawless, who
specializes in employment and labor law.
Each presenter will speak on their area of expertise followed by a round
table discussion.
“Each of us will come in armed with the latest information in our
respective areas,” said Dr. Lesoski. “The challenge is that from an
employer’s perspective in Michigan the law has not been tested yet in the
courts. So without case law to address specifics it is challenging.”
But Dr. Lesoski says this workshop will help educate and prepare employers
to develop policies.
“Certainly, I encourage employers to have a clear-cut substance use policy
that is enforced consistently,” said Dr. Lesoski. “Often employers think
about policies for illegal drugs and don’t take into consideration
prescription drug use and alcohol use. These policies are important.”

HELPING HAND
Tom Gilbert launched his TouchStone Professional Services five years ago
to help those who need intervention from drug and alcohol dependency.
Gilbert a former judge in the area was nicknamed the “pot smoking judge”
after he was spotted smoking pot at a Rolling Stones concert in 2002. He
sought rehabilitation at the encouragement of his wife and friends and
after not seeking re-election chose to help others. Gilbert will bring a
variety of perspectives to the panel discussion.
“We have an excellent attorney joining us already and Dr. Lesoski is
covering the medical end of it. My focus will be to identify abuse and to
discuss how to incorporate an effective intervention in the workplace if
necessary,” said Gilbert. “The people of Michigan have spoken and use of
marijuana for medical purposes is allowed, and as an attorney I would
defend that right. But as a person who has the disease of addiction I know
the other end of the spectrum.
“With alcohol, 90% of the adult population is able to drink responsibly
and I am part of that other 10% and I am sure their is a similar number
with marijuana,” Gilbert adds. So now we are issuing medical marijuana
cards to a certain percentage of the population that is addicted. So my
presentation will be focused on how employers may assist these employees.”
For Gilbert and Lesoski the ambiguity of the law has both employers and
employees confused.
“Certainly, using marijuana on the federal front is illegal and several
jobs will not allow for the use of it even if you have a medical marijuana
card, such as a person with a CDL, a school or public transportation
driver,” said Lesoski. “The way I read the Michigan act is that employers
are not required to accommodate employees who use medical marijuana. So if
your employer has a strict drug use policy that includes marijuana use,
they do not have to make an exception for you if you have a card.”

BEYOND EXPECTATIONS
Interest in the workshop has went beyond the organizers’ expectations. The
Economic Training Council of the Northwest Michigan Council of Governments
has been spearheading the one-day workshop.
“We are now getting calls asking us if we can take this on the road to
other parts of the country. Not sure if that is feasible, but we
anticipate offering this again in the region,” said Sharon Gordon of the
organization.
Dr. Lesoski will take workshop attendees through the testing process and
how his department interprets test results. He will also give those in
attendance signs to look for to determine if an employee is high or
intoxicated.
“The challenge an employer is going to have is if they have a medical
marijuana acceptance policy and also have a drug testing policy,” said
Lesoski. “Since marijuana effects each individual differently it might be
difficult from a testing perspective to determine if a person is high
while working or used medical marijuana the night before.”
Dr. Lesoski did address the issue that had been floating around the
medical marijuana community that Munson had issued an order that its
doctors could not make medical marijuana referrals.
“I have never seen such a document and no one has told me that at Munson,”
he said. “In talking to several of my colleagues in the medical
profession, there are differing views. The challenge is that medical
marijuana has only been around for 20 years. What I mean by that is in the
medical community we have only been studying the medical aspects of it for
a short time. We still do not know all the potential positive or negative
aspects of it.”
As for his perspective, Dr. Lesoski has mixed opinions.
“My biggest problem is we are handing out these medical marijuana cards
like they are candy,” said Dr. Lesoski. “I am not arguing the fact that in
some cases where every possible form of treatment has been tried that some
people find there only relief for pain is with medical marijuana. But
there are several health risks that go along using marijuana. Certainly
some jobs in the workplace a person would not be able to perform if their
mind is altered from drugs or alcohol.”

For info on the Medical Marijuana Workshop call 800-442-1074, or visit
nwm.org/ETC.asp. Registration is available online and is $75 per person.
This workshop is approved for 4 HRCI credits, includes continental
breakfast and lunch, and is recommended by area chambers of commerce.

 
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