Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Letters · A home buyer‘s...
. . . .

A home buyer‘s Paradise...Lost?

Robert Downes - February 21st, 2011
A Home Buyer‘s Paradise... Lost?
Here in the Midwest, we live in a home-buyer’s paradise compared to much of the rest of the world. Realtor Jack Lane (who hosts a real estate show on WTCM-AM) notes that the median price for a home in Grand Traverse County in 2010 was $145,000. The region’s high is Leelanau County, where the median price was $205,000 last year. In Kalkaska County, however, the median price was just $65,000. The median price for a home in Petoskey is reportedly $169,000.
By contrast, the median price for a home in San Diego County last year was $305,000. It was $225,000 in Denver and $205,549 in Fort Lauderdale.
So we’ve got some bargains in Northern Michigan (Leelanau County notwithstanding) and you’d think there would be something of a land rush on here in the region.
What’s holding people back?
“History will show you that most people will wait and wait, hesitant to act before the entire crowd acts,” Lane says. “Therefore, not until interest rates begin to rise and headlines begin to say ‘Housing recovers!’ will you see the market kick back to the levels of ten years ago. Most buyers need ‘the psychological permission’ of the masses. The really smart people are either already wading into the water or are donning their hip-waders as you’re reading this.”
He adds that banks have largely returned to the practice of requiring 20% as a down payment on a mortgage (although the federal government is already backing 3% down loans). Banks are also dishing out the tough love for people with bad credit.
So, imagine a young family trying to come up with a 20% down payment on a $145,000 median-priced home -- that’s $29,000 -- a lot of loot if you’ve got kids and an iffy job situation, not to mention the closing costs. Or, imagine the well-off couple in the $100,000-$175,000 income range, who (as Lane notes) “tend to have typically less than stellar credit.”
Both parties may be out of luck in their hunt for a home for the time being.
Here’s what Lane says is the problem with today’s home-buying market, in order of importance:
1. Consumer confidence in real estate remains low. Until people again believe buying real estate is a wealth builder, the market will not flourish.
2. Banks have eliminated a big chunk of the potential buying market with their new (or shall we say old) requirements of a 20% down payment.
3. Low appraisals (referencing distress sales) are coming in below purchase prices and thus killing deals.
4. High-end speculators, who pushed the 1990-2005 real estate craze -- have also disappeared from the buyer pool, further exacerbating the home supply problem.
Another problem:
“We overbuilt and underfunded for a long, long period. In 2005, 26% of all sales were second home sales,” Lane says. “An absurd number! When we were kids, you could count on about two hands all of the people in town who had two homes; 26% was a preposterous level. My guess is that maybe 7-10% of all people are economically fit to own more than one home. So, now we have to wait until all that overbuilt supply is sold/foreclosed on or torn down and markets adjust, price-wise, before what’s left of the demand side of the market gets anywhere near back in line with the supply.
“This means construction isn’t about to come back any time soon, absent some wildly innovative government program that doesn’t appear to be on the horizon. We’re building less housing units in America, today (300,000) than at any time since 1960. And there are 135 million more people now than there were then.”
Real estate certainly isn’t dead in the water in Northern Michigan, however. The five-county area including Grand Traverse, Leelanau, Benzie, Antrim and Kalkaska accounted for 2,045 homes sold last year, with more than half of them (1,087) sold in Grand Traverse County.
If you’ve watched the real estate listings over the past year, you can’t help but notice there are a lot of bargains on the market Up North and in Michigan in general (in Detroit, HUD homes are going for as little as $1,200).
My wife and I enjoy watching the HGTV home & garden channel at night, with shows such as “House Hunters” and “Property Virgins” depicting the search for housing all over the world -- Cairo, Copenhagen, Toronto, northern France, the Seychelle Islands -- you name it. We can‘t believe the insane prices for homes elsewhere, even for properties that look like dumps. Often, you see couples on these shows shelling out $500,000 or so for homes that would go for one-quarter of that here in Northern Michigan -- still a home-buyer’s paradise.


 
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