Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Bill Staines 3/21/11
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Bill Staines 3/21/11

Rick Coates - March 21st, 2011
The Long Road of Bill Staines: Folkie cult favorite logs 65,000 miles each year
By Rick Coates
Sleder’s Family Tavern has been offering their On The Porch Concert for
several years and one of the favorites has been singer/songwriter folkie
Bill Staines. He will return this Sunday, March 27 after just making a
swing through Michigan 10 days ago.
“This will be my eighth show at Sleder’s and I have played Traverse City
and Northern Michigan several times,” said Staines. “I was just in
Michigan and up north at the Cabbage Shed and then drove back to my home
in New Hampshire. For me, driving a couple days is a typical commute.”
Staines has been touring since 1969. He averages about 200 shows a year
and puts 65,000 miles annually on his car.
“I feel very fortunate to be keeping busy and I try to perform every night
on the road.  A night off here and there is okay, but three nights off in
a row is murder for me,” said Staines.  “So when I book a tour I like to
be performing every night.”

WRITING WOES
It has been five years since Staines has been in the studio and his time
on the road has made it challenging for him to write new songs. 
“I can’t write on the road; even when I am staying in a hotel there is
just too much happening around me. The only times I can write is when I am
at home, or if I am staying with people in their home and they are off at
work. I am not someone who carries around a notebook and jots down every
thought, or phrase he hears.”
So is he planing to head into the studio soon ?
“I am going to have to start applying myself to my writing. I do not
currently have anything in the works,” said Staines. “This business is
about the rhythms; you have to stay in both a touring and recording rhythm
to stay successful, if you don’t then you start drifting away. So I have
to get back into the studio.”
What about home recording?
“I don’t have a home studio. I chuckle when people ask because for my last
album I recorded cassettes on my kid’s Playschool recorder and sent them
out to the musicians to listen to before we went into the studio. So that
is as close to a home recording school as I have.”
After all these years what keeps Bill Staines motivated?
“What keeps me motivated? In one word: it would be ‘fear,’” said Staines. 
“I have what I call little victories, the adventures on the road, who you
might meet, a phone call from someone like Pete Seeger or Celtic Thunder
wanting to record one of my songs. I look for these little victories every
day and at the end of the day maybe nothing happened; but then I say there
might be a victory tomorrow and that is what helps to keep me motivated.”
FOLK’S NICHE
He sees a strong future for folk music.
“Look, I am not performing top-40 material but I think there will always
be a market for folk music; there will always be a niche,” said Staines.
I really believe house concerts have been great additions to the business;
these shows keep you busy during the week and this is reverting back to
the old Irish troubadours who traveled to peoples’ homes, told stories and
performed music.”
Is it more challenging today from the standpoint of competition?
“There is more competition today, there are probably five to six times the
number of folk venues today than when I started and 10 to 12 times the
number of musicians,” said Staines.  “It is much easier to record music
and get it out there today and this has allowed for a lot more mediocrity.
It use to be if you were signed with a record label it was a big deal.”
Staines has built quite the folk resume appearing on Garrison Keillor’s A
Prairie Home Companion, HBO’s Deadwood, and Public Radio’s Mountain Stage.
Additionally, his music has been used in a number of films including Off
and Running with Cyndi Lauper, and The Return of the Secaucus Seven, John
Sayles’ debut as a writer- director. In 1975, Staines won the National
Yodeling Championship in Kerrville Texas. 
He has recorded 26 albums; The Happy Wanderer and One More River were
winners of the Parents’ Choice Award. His songs have been recorded by many
artists including Peter, Paul & Mary, Tommy Makem and Liam Clancy, The
Highwaymen, Mason Williams, Grandpa Jones, Jerry Jeff Walker, Nanci
Griffith and Glen Yarborough among others. 

Bill Staines will perform Sunday, March 27 at 4 pm as part of the Sleder’s
Family Tavern On The Porch Concert Series. Tickets are $15 in advance and
$20 at the door and are available at Sleder’s Family Tavern, Oryana Food
Cooperative and Sound It Out Records. For tickets and more info call
231-947-9213.

 
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