Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Shop Celtic at Emmet County
. . . .

Shop Celtic at Emmet County

Kristi Kates - March 7th, 2011
Shop Celtic at County Emmet
By Kristi Kates
“Everybody’s got an Irish, Scottish, or Welsh connection,” explains Ed
Karmann, owner of one of downtown Petoskey’s newest stores, the County
Emmet Celtic Shop.
“You know - people want to identify with a group, or a nationality,”
Karmann continues, “and the Irish, Scottish, and Welsh are all fiercely
loyal to their countries.”
Loyal to their countries, and, on a lighter note, often nearly as loyal to
the products of those countries, as well, from clothing to candy bars.
That was part of the impetus for Karmann and his wife, Linda (and, of
course, “The Boys“ - their two dogs, Scottish Deerhound Hamish and Irish
Wolfhound Saoirse) to begin their new Celtic venture.

FACES OF IRELAND
The doors to County Emmet Celtic Shop swung open on October 22, the result
of plenty of preparation plus longtime retail experience - and a bit o’
Irish influence - on Karmann’s part.
“I’ve been in retail for 30, 35 years,” he says, “and I have an Irish
background on my mother’s side. My wife and I travel to Ireland fairly
often, both to visit and to find products for the shop.”
When they do go to Ireland, he explains, they typically land in Dublin,
rent a car, visit some relatives, and then explore a different part of the
country each time they visit. He’s reluctant to name favorites, though, as
he says that Ireland has so many different faces.
“Dublin’s a very cool city,” Karmann enthuses, “it’s got lots of history,
and lots of things to do. While up in the northwest, Gaelic is spoken, and
it’s a very remote and very beautiful part of the country. So it’s all
very different.”

SWEATERS TO SODA POP
Part of the Karmanns’ travels, as mentioned earlier, include finding items
for their store.
“Because we’re a new shop, we’re trying pretty much anything,” Karmann
explains, “if you own a Celtic shop, there’s a trade association you can
join. So most of our merchandise is from trade shows, and from our trips
to Ireland. I was in Dublin for a trade show just a month ago.”
The shop, which carries everything from DVDs and CDs, greeting cards,
books, art, and souvenirs to home décor, clothing, and jewelry, also
offers foodstuffs and even drinks for those familiar with Irish, Scottish,
and Welsh products.
“We may have gone overboard in the food department,” Karmann laughs, “a
lot of the foods we carry might be recognized by those who have spent a
lot of time overseas.”
Bewley’s teas, Oatfield-brand candies, and the very popular bright-orange
soda known in Ireland as Irn-Bru (pronounced “iron brew”), are only a few
of their food and beverage offerings.
Karmann says that other great sellers include the Celtic jewelry and the
thick-knit Irish-made sweaters.
“Novelty and rugby t-shirts have been selling more lately, too, as we get
closer to St. Patrick’s Day,” he says.

CELTIC CONNECTIONS
With the current County Emmet Celtic Shop taking up about 1,100 square
feet, Karmann says they have no plans to expand the physical building any
time soon, but they do plan to continue expanding their product line.
“We have a lot of merchandise arriving very soon from the last trade show
we went to in Ireland,” he says.
But as much fun as that international shopping may be, Karmann says what
he enjoys most are the customers themselves.
“What I still like best is just talking with the people and hearing all of
their interesting stories and Celtic connections,” he says, “and I like
seeing people get a kick out of certain products - some of them will walk
out of here with an entire handful of candy bars, saying, ‘I haven’t seen
this candy in years, since I was last in Ireland - I can’t believe you
carry it here!’ It’s just fun.”

County Emmet Celtic Shop is located at 221 East Lake Street in downtown
Petoskey, telephone 231-753-2027. They are open Tuesdays-Saturdays 10 am-6
pm, Sundays 11 am-4 pm, and are closed Mondays, and may also be found
online at www.countyemmet.com.

 
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