Letters

Letters 05-02-2016

Facts About Trails I would like to correct some misinformation provided in Kristi Kates’ article about the Shore-to-Shore Trail in your April 18 issue. The Shore-to-Shore Trail is not the longest continuous trail in the Lower Peninsula. That honor belongs to the North Country Trail (NCT), which stretches for over 400 miles in the Lower Peninsula. In fact, 100 miles of the NCT is within a 30-minute drive of Traverse City, and is maintained by the Grand Traverse Hiking Club...

North Korea Is Bluffing I eagerly read Jack Segal’s columns and attend his lectures whenever possible. However, I think his April 24th column falls into an all too common trap. He casually refers to a nuclear-armed North Korea when there is no proof whatever that North Korea has any such weapons. Sure, they have set off some underground explosions but so what? Tonga could do that. Every nuclear-armed country on Earth has carried out at least one aboveground test, just to prove they could do it if for no other reason. All we have is North Korea’s word for their supposed capabilities, which is no proof at all...

Double Dipping? In Greg Shy’s recent letter, he indicated that his Social Security benefit was being unfairly reduced simply due to the fact that he worked for the government. Somehow I think something is missing here. As I read it this law is only for those who worked for the government and are getting a pension from us generous taxpayers. Now Greg wants his pension and he also wants a full measure of Social Security benefits even though he did not pay into Social Security...

Critical Thinking Needed Our media gives ample coverage to some presidential candidates calling each other a liar and a sleaze bag. While entertaining to some, this certainly should lower one’s respect for either candidate. This race to the bottom comes as no surprise given their lack of respect for the rigors of critical thinking. The world’s esteemed scientists take great steps to preserve the integrity of their findings. Not only are their findings peer reviewed by fellow experts in their specialty, whenever possible the findings are cross-checked by independent studies...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Rochelle Clark 3/21/11
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Rochelle Clark 3/21/11

Kristi Kates - March 21st, 2011
Rochelle Clark steps out solo
By Kristi Kates
Under-the-radar duo The Potter’s Field may be a little tricky to find on the Internet, but you can find its members all ‘round Northern Michigan, performing at local venues as well as clubs in the Ann Arbor region. Rochelle Clark is one of those two members, and she’ll be performing her own solo show as part of the Charlevoix Library’s Winterfolk Concert Series this month.
Clark, who says she’s been interested in playing music since she was a little girl, was inspired in part by family, and in part by an inherent need to craft music.
“Both my dad and my grandpa were musicians, so music has always been a big part of my life,” she explains.
Currently working on what she calls “the singer-songwriter thing,” Clark lives in Chelsea, and has been frequenting Northern Michigan as one-half of The Potter’s Field at Short’s Brewery in Bellaire and The Noggin Room in Petoskey.
“I love Northern Michigan,” Clark says, “I’ve had some wonderful gigs in the area. With The Potter’s Field, we love to get up here as often as possible.”

AMERICANA INSPIRATION
Clark says she’s new to solo performance, as well as to writing songs of her own, but her experiences with The Potter’s Field are seeing her progress quickly, adding another facet to her performances aside from her live work with the duo.
“I play the guitar, and I attempt to play the mandolin,” she says. “I took weekly lessons for two years, but I’ve learned more about my instrument by playing out than I ever did from all those lessons. The lessons built the foundation, but you learn so much more when you’re forced to perform in front of an audience. And I’m learning a lot from my duet partner (The Potter’s Field’s other half, John Natiw) about the craft of songwriting.”
The audiences certainly show up to hear Clark perform. Her own brand of Americana music, which is seasoned by folk, bluegrass, and alt-country (“I love alt-country music,” she says), is also inspired by the likes of Brandi Carlile, Kasey Chambers, and Gillian Welch, to name a few. She also says she’s somewhat obsessed with American southern-rock band The Black Crowes.
Most of her original songs to date, though, are more personal in nature and relate closely to her own life.
“I find I’ve always got ideas floating around in my head, so it’s fun to try and track them down and see where they’ll lead,” she says, “I get inspired by all kinds of things, but most of my ideas arrive out of conversations with friends and family. I keep a small notebook with me wherever I go, and write down things that strike me.”

CD CONNECTIONS
Something that’s struck Clark about performing in Northern Michigan, she says, are the people who attend her shows. While the local scene may be quite a bit different from her regular stomping grounds in the Chelsea/Ann Arbor area, the region appeals to Clark both artistically and through the friends and fans she’s made here.
“The connection with people I might not otherwise have met is the most rewarding thing about performing in general,” she explains, “and I’ve been blessed to meet some extraordinary individuals over the last two years. It’s allowed me to grow as a musician and as a person - it’s an unexpected perk.”
Both Clark and The Potter’s Field stand to meet a lot more people this spring and summer, with big plans on the way in the studio and on the touring circuit.
“The Potter’s Field is recording our first full-length CD, and we’re hoping to have it completed and released this summer,” Clark says, “we’re also trying to put together a tour for summer or early fall. That’s another perk of performing - getting to travel to so many different places!” she smiles.

Rochelle Clark will be performing as part of the Winterfolk Concert Series at the Charlevoix Public Library on Monday, March 28 at 6:30 p.m. For info, contact the library at 231-547-2651.
 
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