Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Becky Thatcher 3/28/11
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Becky Thatcher 3/28/11

Robert Downes - March 28th, 2011
Becky Thatcher: Best Jeweler is also a World Traveler
By Robert Downes
Business has literally been an adventure for Becky Thatcher, who has roamed the world in search of gemstones and pearls which drape the counters of her jewelry stores around the region.
It’s this dedication to tracking down the best of the best -- even going to the far side of the world -- that earned Becky honors as “best jeweler” in Leelanau County.
Creating dazzling works of art in jewelry has been a lifelong quest.
“I’m a metalsmith as well as a jewelry designer,” she notes on a sunny day at her studio and shop in Glen Arbor. “I did my first piece when I was 10 and started taking classes when I was 16. I loved working with metal and all of the different ways you can manipulate it.”
Family vacations led her to Glen Arbor as a child, followed by a stint as an artist here in the ‘70s which ended with getting “starved out.” She returned to Glen Arbor in 1983 and established Becky Thatcher Designs in a small bungalow just off the beach. She -- and the town -- have been on a roll ever since.

EARLY DAYS
“Glen Arbor was still kind of a sleepy place when I got here,” she recalls. “People tended to stay here for the whole summer, or for a month. Today, we have a lot of people who visit for the weekend.”
In the summer months that means a lot of traffic, with upscale tourists from Chicago and the Detroit suburbs. The region’s tourist boom led Thatcher to open a new store in Leland in 1988; then one in Harbor Springs; a location in Key West; and a new store in Traverse City six years ago.
But it’s the quality of her creations that has made Becky Thatcher Designs a success, complemented by her hunt for precious stones, beads and pearls in far-flung Sri Lanka, Hong Kong and Bangkok.
“I’ve been going to Asia for the past 25 years,” she says. “I still go to Asia every year to find (gem) cutters who work with unusual materials.”
Those materials include boulder opals, tourmaline, sapphire, tanzanite, Mandarin garnet, rubies, zircons, pink spinels, beryls and rutilated quartz. Pearls (which Thatcher prefers for herself) come from Indonesia, Tahiti and Australia. “They’re cultured pearls, but all natural colors,” she notes.
At first, navigating the complexities of tracking down cutters and doing business in places like Sri Lanka and Thailand was rough going, but Thatcher persevered despite civil wars and regime changes to consider.
“Going overseas was intimidating and kind of scary at first,” she recalls, but adds that some early advice prompted her to take the dare.
“I had a wonderful accountant who told me to have some goals, write them down and dream big. And once you have the dream, it’s kind of like, why not?”

ETHICAL STANDARDS
Today, she has strong business connections overseas. “My main cutter is a Cambodian refugee I’ve known for more than 20 years,” she says. “He buys rough stones close to the source.”
She’s also helped some Asian communities to clean up their acts -- for example, by pointing out that water pollution can harm a thriving pearl bed, and by insisting on ethical standards and organizations for buying precious jewels. “We work hard to be very ‘green’ in our work.”
Her Asian connections have also led her further afield: Last year, she and her husband David Watt traveled to Mongolia for a three-week camping expedition on horseback along the Siberian border. They’ve also hiked to a base camp on Mt. Everest in the Himalayas and, of course, have been all over the rest of Asia.
Closer to home, Thatcher has a staff of at least nine full-time employees, adding seasonal help as needed. With five stores to supply, she and her staff have their work cut out for them, literally.
What are her favorites to design and wear?
“I love opals,” she says. “I love their color -- I like the blues and greens because they remind me of water.”
She also has a weakness for pearls, and her stores are filled with standout collections. “Some of us consider ourselves ‘pearl girls’ -- there’s something about the way they feel on your neck,” she says. “I grab a string of pearls almost every day.”
And what a fine selection to choose from...
 
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