Letters

Letters 07-28-14

Worry About Legals

I can’t figure out what perplexes me more, the misinformation everywhere in the media or those who believe it to be true. Take the Hobby Lobby case; as a company that is primarily owned by a religious family, they felt their First Amendment rights were infringed upon by the “Affordable” Care Act...

Stop Labeling and Enjoy

I have been struggling to find a simple way of understanding for myself the concepts of conservative, liberal, and moderation as it relates to our social interactions with each other...

Proposal One & The Public Good

Are you kidding me? Another corporate giveaway with loopholes for large corporations who rule us? Hasn’t our corrupt and worthless governor done enough to raise taxes, provide corporate welfare, unjustly tax pensions, and shut down elected officials with his emergency manager racket...

The Truth About Road Workers

Apparently Mr. Kachadurian did not catch on to the fact that the MDOT Employee Memorial in Clare is a tribute to highway workers who lost their lives building our transportation systems. It was paid for by current and former MDOT employees who likely knew some of these people personally...

Idiotic and Misguided

As a seasonal resident, I always look forward to reading your paper, if only because of the idiotic letters to the editor and off the wall columns...


Home · Articles · News · Music · 4Play:R.E.M., Beady Eye, The...
. . . .

4Play:R.E.M., Beady Eye, The Strokes, Elbow 3/28/11

Kristi Kates - March 28th, 2011
R.E.M. - Collapse Into Now - Warner Bros.
The Little Athens Band That Could harken back to their good old days with their newest set, as produced by legend-in-the-making Jacknife Lee. Tracked in New Orleans and at Berlin’s famed Hansa Studios, the album includes special appearances by Eddie Vedder, Patti Smith, and Hidden Cameras’ Joel Gibb - but the real elements to note are the songs themselves. “Discoverer” is classic R.E.M. (their more optimistic side, as well), with big Peter Buck guitars and an undeniable hook; “Uberlin” and “Oh My Heart” showcase R.E.M.’s ability to craft evocative indie ballads; and album closer “Blue” lets Stipe’s speaking voice take center stage.



Beady Eye - Different Gear, Still Speeding - Dangerbird
Liam Gallagher’s first project since splitting from his brother Noel and their long-term, highly successful Brit band Oasis, Beady Eye’s songs are often along the same track as Oasis, albeit with a little more sass. First single “The Roller” features that familiar Liam yowl on the lead vocals, with comrades Gem Archer and Andy Bell picking up the rest of the instrumentals; the rest of the songs are plenty catchy and radio-friendly, but not so much as to sell out nor tarnish what Oasis established in the Brit rock genre. Other highlights of this debut set include the quirky “Millionaire,” the pretty “For Anyone,” and the singalongable “The Beat Goes On.”



The Strokes - Angles - RCA/Rough Trade
All eyes are on The Strokes as they release their fourth album, which was reportedly recorded within a swirl of band conflict and a bit of a power play between unofficial bandleader Julian Casablancas and his sidemen - er, bandmates. In spite of all of that, the latest collection of Strokes tunes is as confident and moody as anything that’s been released before, from the buoyancy of “Machu Picchu” to the perfectly balanced guitar/vocal dissonance of “You’re So Right,” the near folk-pop of “Undercover of Darkness,” and the whistling Cars-era synths of “Games.” It’s a solid polish on the band’s signature sound, all arguments aside for the music.


Elbow - Build a Rocket Boys! - Downtown
Manchester indie-rockers Elbow have long sat in queue behind their other Brit-rock peers, although many of their songs are easily comparable. This album may finally set them apart stateside, with concrete-solid hooks and the sweeping instrumentals that reside behind Guy Garvey’s Peter-Gabriel-esque vocal lines. Arena-ready first single “Neat Little Rows” is joined by the life-affirming “Open Arms,” with its equally huge choruses, and “Dear Friends,” a paean to the pals of the song’s title, complete with lyrics just this side of overly-sentimental and horn lines fit for theatre productions. It’s all well-written and performed with sonic self-assurance.
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close