Letters

Letters 07-06-2015

Safety on the “Bridge to Nowhere” Grant Parsons wrote an articulate column in opposition to the proposed Traverse City pier at the mouth of the Boardman River. He cites issues such as limited access, lack of parking, increased congestion, environmental degradation, and pork barrel spending of tax dollars. I would add another to this list: public safety...

Vote Carefully A recent poll showed 84% of Michiganders support increasing Michigan’s renewable energy standard to at least 20% from the current 10%. Yet Representative Ray Franz has sponsored legislation to eliminate the standard. This out of touch position is reminiscent of Franz’s opposition to the Pure Michigan campaign and support for increased taxes on retirees....

Credit Where Credit Is Due I think you should do another article about the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund giving proper credit to all involved, not just Tom Washington. Many others were just as involved...

I’ve Changed My Mind The Supreme Court has determined that states cannot keep same-sex couples from marrying and must recognize their unions. This has happened with breathtaking suddenness. It took 246 years for Americans to decide that slavery was wrong and abolish it, but it’s been only a couple of decades since any successful attempt was made to legalize same-sex marriage, and four years since a majority of the American public supported legalization...


Home · Articles · News · Music · 4Play:R.E.M., Beady Eye, The...
. . . .

4Play:R.E.M., Beady Eye, The Strokes, Elbow 3/28/11

Kristi Kates - March 28th, 2011
R.E.M. - Collapse Into Now - Warner Bros.
The Little Athens Band That Could harken back to their good old days with their newest set, as produced by legend-in-the-making Jacknife Lee. Tracked in New Orleans and at Berlin’s famed Hansa Studios, the album includes special appearances by Eddie Vedder, Patti Smith, and Hidden Cameras’ Joel Gibb - but the real elements to note are the songs themselves. “Discoverer” is classic R.E.M. (their more optimistic side, as well), with big Peter Buck guitars and an undeniable hook; “Uberlin” and “Oh My Heart” showcase R.E.M.’s ability to craft evocative indie ballads; and album closer “Blue” lets Stipe’s speaking voice take center stage.



Beady Eye - Different Gear, Still Speeding - Dangerbird
Liam Gallagher’s first project since splitting from his brother Noel and their long-term, highly successful Brit band Oasis, Beady Eye’s songs are often along the same track as Oasis, albeit with a little more sass. First single “The Roller” features that familiar Liam yowl on the lead vocals, with comrades Gem Archer and Andy Bell picking up the rest of the instrumentals; the rest of the songs are plenty catchy and radio-friendly, but not so much as to sell out nor tarnish what Oasis established in the Brit rock genre. Other highlights of this debut set include the quirky “Millionaire,” the pretty “For Anyone,” and the singalongable “The Beat Goes On.”



The Strokes - Angles - RCA/Rough Trade
All eyes are on The Strokes as they release their fourth album, which was reportedly recorded within a swirl of band conflict and a bit of a power play between unofficial bandleader Julian Casablancas and his sidemen - er, bandmates. In spite of all of that, the latest collection of Strokes tunes is as confident and moody as anything that’s been released before, from the buoyancy of “Machu Picchu” to the perfectly balanced guitar/vocal dissonance of “You’re So Right,” the near folk-pop of “Undercover of Darkness,” and the whistling Cars-era synths of “Games.” It’s a solid polish on the band’s signature sound, all arguments aside for the music.


Elbow - Build a Rocket Boys! - Downtown
Manchester indie-rockers Elbow have long sat in queue behind their other Brit-rock peers, although many of their songs are easily comparable. This album may finally set them apart stateside, with concrete-solid hooks and the sweeping instrumentals that reside behind Guy Garvey’s Peter-Gabriel-esque vocal lines. Arena-ready first single “Neat Little Rows” is joined by the life-affirming “Open Arms,” with its equally huge choruses, and “Dear Friends,” a paean to the pals of the song’s title, complete with lyrics just this side of overly-sentimental and horn lines fit for theatre productions. It’s all well-written and performed with sonic self-assurance.
 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close