Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · The Homeless Game:
. . . .

The Homeless Game:

Tom Carr - February 7th, 2011
The Homeless Game: Board game puts players in touch with a harsh reality
By Tom Carr
Liz Coon moves her piece on the game board and finds she’s become
homeless because of domestic violence. The game board directs her to
the Goodwill Inn, a shelter in Traverse City.
That’s not really how she became homeless, though Coon can relate to
the end result.
“I had no money to rent an apartment with and I was on disability for
a stomach surgery,” she said. “So I called (Goodwill Inn) and they
said I qualified to come in and stay, which was very nice.”
Coon is one of five people who played a demonstration of the game they
call Ups and Downs. Four of the players are homeless and one was for
six years until recently.
Their reasons run the gamut: Divorce, medical problems, drinking, job loss.

SHARED EXPERIENCE
John Daniels, who volunteers at the shelter, had asked several
residents to design a game based on their experiences.
The exercise was to portray their stories in a fun, creative way.
“When we were developing this game, the idea was starting at the
ground level of having a place, but being able to fall into
homelessness or climb all the way out of it,” he said.
Different residents created different versions. One game, etched on a
pizza box, imitated Monopoly.
The version the group has adopted and continues to refine is designed
after the children’s game Chutes and Ladders.
But this is not child’s play.
With a roll of the die, players ascend ladders that reflect the goals
people often must achieve to climb out of their predicament. Players
advance upward toward the winning square by getting a job or finding
an affordable car.
Or maybe they obtain a Bridge card – the 21st century equivalent of
food stamps – to reduce their basic living expenses.
On the other hand, they may land on a square that signifies going
through a divorce, getting laid off, getting drunk or fighting with
roommates.
Land on one of those, and a player slides back downward toward living
in a homeless shelter.
Or worse yet, living out of a car.

MOVING FORWARD
Tom Ockert, who worked on versions of the game, explains:
“You’ve got to keep everything moving forward,” he said. “It’s easy to
fall into the structure of depression.”
For some, it’s drinking and drugs. Even without those vices, self-pity
can take hold.
“Then you’re just putting every forward step that you wanted to make
in the background because you had this craving or this feeling of
depression that your life has lost its value,” he said.
The players laugh as they learn of their fictional fates.
Yet they’ve all lived the game.
Ockert became homeless after financial problems brought on by illness.
He spent the last several years alternating between the shelter,
winter nights on church meeting-room floors and staying at friends’
homes.
He finally has a subsidized apartment and praised the gameboard’s realism.
“Homelessness is a lot of chance,” he said. “If you’re active, out and
trying to look for a job, something could knock you out. Like if you
get too wet, and your pants start chaffing you or something. And then
you’re feeling ill and disabled or whatever. And you go to apply for a
job. And you’re wet and sore, and you’re not in your best joyful mood
to encourage an employer to hire you.”

NOBODY CAME
Peter Horrom retired in May after a 30-year career in the Army,
including seven tours in Iraq.
Peter said that when he retired, he made arrangements to have family
and church members show up at the airport.
Nobody came.
“It was like after midnight when I came here,” he said. “I got here to
Goodwill Inn about 2 in the morning. I had to do all the paperwork and
process.”
He’s been staying at the shelter ever since, hoping his pension kicks in soon.
At least he knows his situation should be temporary.
Still, waiting is a reality for people without a home, says Ockert.
He was on a waiting list for two and a half years to get into his apartment.
“You’re waiting to get your Bridge card. You’re waiting in lines to
take a shower,” he said.
So the game has made it difficult to obtain some of the things they
wait for in real life. Like an identification card or a checking
account.
Daniels plans to make several copies of the game.
He wants to have community groups play it with the designers to help
them better understand the issues.
Lynn Cifka, homeless after a divorce and medical problems, said
developing the game has benefitted her already.
“It’s helped my self-esteem a little bit because I like being creative
anyways,” she said. “And just trying to get out there to educate
people. To say, ‘This is our situation’.”

 
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