Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Books · Sterling‘s stories 4/11/11
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Sterling‘s stories 4/11/11

Glen Young - April 11th, 2011
Sterling’s Stories: Delving into the heart of Northern Michigan… briefly
In Which Brief Stories Are Told
By Phillip Sterling
Wayne State University Press
$18.95
By Glen Young
Phillip Sterling believes that although Northern Michigan is part of “the Midwest,” there is a sensibility in the Great Lakes state that separates us from our neighbors.

“It’s somewhere between Hell and Paradise. Not only is it geographically true, but I think it says something about the tendency toward exploring the extreme in celebrating American culture,” Sterling says about the competing tendencies of Northern Michigan.
“We’re called Midwestern but we’re not Midwestern in the sense of say Indiana or Illinois. We’re thought of as North, but we’re not North in the way of say Minnesota.”
Sterling is the author of the newly released “In Which Brief Stories Are Told.” He says our region’s connected separateness is a recurrent theme in the 15 stories that make up his new book, recently published as part of the “Made in Michigan Writers Series” from the Wayne State University Press.

TC ROOTS
Sterling, who lives in Cascade near Grand Rapids, grew up in Traverse City, graduating from TC Senior High in 1969. He has been teaching writing and literature at Ferris State University for 24 years.
His stories, several of which are set in the Grand Traverse region, combine Sterling’s practiced poetic perspective with keen observations.
Examples abound, such as in the story “An Account in Her Name,” narrated by a woman whose sister Edie went missing years earlier. The narrator returns to Beulah, where she is to meet with a local banker to settle an account still open in her missing sister’s name.
The story’s central question, posed rhetorically near the conclusion, begs to know, “What does it mean to save a person’s life? At what cost?” Sterling’s narrator grapples with the knowledge she did not save her sibling and thought the sisterly bond is still, if more thinly than before, intact.
Sterling says the settings are reminiscent of his own past. “My dad did own a restaurant, and my sister was a lifeguard at Beulah Beach,” as is true in the story. “My father bought a cottage because my grandmother owned a cottage on Platte Lake,” he says.
The story’s tension, created out of the narrator’s belief that she never completely knew her own sister, is however, fictional. “There are place details that are accurate,” Sterling says, but like any credible fiction writer, he propels his memories into inventions.

THE POET GAME
The recipient of Fulbright Lectureship awards, as well as fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Sterling is better known as a poet, having published several volumes of verse. He admits he had to put poetry aside while working on this collection.
“This past summer, when I was working through this book, revising it, I was not writing poetry.”
He adds that the process works both ways. “When I was working on the books of poetry, I was not writing fiction.”
“In Which Brief Stories Are Told” represents decades of Sterling’s fictional efforts. “A couple of them date back 20 years,” he says.
When he determined to publish a book of fiction, Sterling sought guidance in a variety of ways.
“I started to read more contemporary fiction, and that was influential in seeing how the styles have changed,” he says. He admits he had some initial concerns. “I kept finding that my stories were not along the lines of what a lot of the presses were publishing.
“I’d published a few here and there over the years,” he says of the stories in his collection. “It was a winnowing process… I essentially collected everything I had and started sending them out.”
The editors at Wayne State recognized a thematic connection, and suggested the book be considered for the Made In Michigan Series.
Sterling admits that the long gaps between his work on particular stories were a concern. His work on this collection has made him a better, more efficient, writer, he believes. “I notice it more in terms of drafting. I can catch the things I might change in story more quickly than I would have five or six years ago.”

Phillip Sterling and Interlochen’s Michael Delp will be reading and signing books at Horizon Books in Traverse City on April 27 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. They will participate in a literary discussion at the City Opera House, as part of the National Writers Series, on April 28 at 7 p.m. For more information on tickets call 231-342-0611, or visit www.nationalwritersseries.org
 
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