Letters

Letters 07-27-2015

Next For Brownfields In regard to your recent piece on brownfield redevelopment in TC, the Randolph Street project appears to be proceeding without receiving its requested $600k in brownfield funding from the county. In response to this, the mayor is quoted as saying that the developer bought the property prior to performing an environmental assessment and had little choice but to now build it...

Defending Our Freedom This is in response to Sally MacFarlane Neal’s recent letter, “War Machines for Family Entertainment.” Wake Up! Make no mistake about it, we are at war! Even though the idiot we have for a president won’t accept the fact because he believes we can negotiate with Iran, etc., ISIS and their like make it very clear they intend to destroy the free world as we know it. If you take notice of the way are constantly destroying their own people, is that living...

What Is Far Left? Columnist Steve Tuttle, who so many lambaste as a liberal, considers Sen. Sanders a far out liberal “nearly invisible from the middle.” Has the middle really shifted that far right? Sanders has opposed endless war and the Patriot Act. Does Mr. Tuttle believe most of our citizens praise our wars and the positive results we have achieved from them? Is supporting endless war or giving up our civil liberties middle of the road...

Parking Corrected Stephen Tuttle commented on parking in the July 13 Northern Express. As Director of the Traverse City Downtown Development Authority, I feel compelled to address a couple key issues. But first, I acknowledge that  there is some consternation about parking downtown. As more people come downtown served by less parking, the pressure on what parking we have increases. Downtown serves a county with a population of 90,000 and plays host to over three million visitors annually...

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4Play: Paul Simon, Alison Krauss & Union Station, Alexander, Robbie Robertson

Kristi Kates - April 18th, 2011
Paul Simon - So Beautiful, So What - Hear Music
Simon returns with some of his best music since back in the Graceland
days, featuring an emotional range of new songs fully graced (ahem) with
diverse worldbeat instrumentations pinned to intelligent-folk roots. With
vocals barely aged even as Simon approaches 70 years old, he crafts smart
storytelling vehicles via music that beckon the ear and spark discussion.
“Questions for the Angels” harkens empathy for the homeless through one of
Simon’s trademark ballads; “The Afterlife” throws a bit of humor into the
mix; “Dazzling Blue” mixes exotic percussion and fiddle; and highlight
“Love is Eternal Sacred Light” is as catchy as Simon’s music ever was.
 
Alison Krauss and Union Station - Paper Airplane - Rounder Records
It took a few years for Krauss and crew to craft something that they
apparantly felt would stand up to their 3-Grammy-winning 2004 release
(Lonely Runs Both Ways), but they’re back in full force with this one,
which showcases every facet of Krauss’ influences, from
Americana/roots/bluegrass music to country and pop. Krauss’ voice is a
consistent element throughout for the most part (three songs are sung by
Union Station’s Dan Tyminski), whether on the pensive “Lie Awake,” the
serene “Dimming of the Day,” and the slightly darker “Sinking Stone.” It’s
nothing particularly groundbreaking, but a consistent, strong, and
appealing set of tunes.
 

Alexander - Alexander - Vagrant
Alexander Ebert - otherwise known as the frontman for indie band Edward
Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros - steps out as a solo artist for the first
time on this set, which features ten songs that Ebert wrote, performed,
and recorded entirely by himself, solely on guitar, organ, violin,
clarinet, and his vocals. Reminiscent of the simpler, candy-coated songs
of the ’60s, these are appealing numbers for the most part, and slightly
more in-depth than the songs of that earlier era - “Glimpses” is a pretty,
soul-inflected number, while “In the Twilight” is a deeper mediation on
life happenings; the highlight may be “Million Years” with its unexpected
hook.
 
Robbie Robertson - How to Become Clairvoyant - 429 Records
Robertson’s fifth solo album sees the guitarist bringing in a colony of
heavy-hitters for his first album in over a decade, including Eric
Clapton, Robert Randolph, Tom Morello, Steve Winwood, and Trent Reznor,
plus production by Marius de Vries. Heavy on retro-rock and various (if
obvious) guitar variations, this is more mainstream than Robertson’s
previous recent-ish efforts, and includes the heavy attackers “Straight
Down the Line” and “He Don’t Live Here No More” for starters (complete
with Clapton on backing vox); diversions from the rockers include the
atmospheric title track, and closer “Tango for Django” with its
instrumental flair.
 

 
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