Letters

Letters 09-29-2014

Benishek Doesn’t Understand

Congressman Benishek claims to understand the needs of families, yet he wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which would cause about 10 million people to lose their health insurance. He must think as long as families can hold fundraisers they don’t need insurance...

(Un)Truth In Advertising

Constant political candidate ads on TV are getting to be too much to bear 45 days before the election...

Rare Tuttle Rebuttal

Finally, I disagree with Stephen Tuttle. His “Cherry Bomb” column in the 8/4/14 issue totally dismayed me. I always love his wit and the slamming of the 1 percent. His use of fact and hyperbole highlights the truth; until “Cherry Bomb.” Oh man, Stephen...

Say No To Fluoride

Do you or your child’s teeth have white, yellow, orange, brown, stains, spots, streaks, cloudy splotches or pitting? If so, you may be among millions of Americans who now have a condition called dental fluorosis...

Questions Of Freedom

The administration’s “Affordable Health Care Act” has ordered religious orders to provide contraception and chemical abortions against the church’s God given beliefs and teachings … an interesting order, considering the First Amendment’s clear prohibitions...

Stop The Insults & Talk

I found it interesting that Ms. Minervini used the Northern Express to push the Safe Harbor agenda for a 90-bed homeless shelter in Traverse City with a tactic that is also being utilized by members of the city commission. Those of us who oppose the project are being labeled as uncompassionate citizens...

Roads and Republicans

Each time you hit a road crater while driving, thank the “nerd” and the Tea Party controlled Republican legislature.

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4Play: Paul Simon, Alison Krauss & Union Station, Alexander, Robbie Robertson

Kristi Kates - April 18th, 2011
Paul Simon - So Beautiful, So What - Hear Music
Simon returns with some of his best music since back in the Graceland
days, featuring an emotional range of new songs fully graced (ahem) with
diverse worldbeat instrumentations pinned to intelligent-folk roots. With
vocals barely aged even as Simon approaches 70 years old, he crafts smart
storytelling vehicles via music that beckon the ear and spark discussion.
“Questions for the Angels” harkens empathy for the homeless through one of
Simon’s trademark ballads; “The Afterlife” throws a bit of humor into the
mix; “Dazzling Blue” mixes exotic percussion and fiddle; and highlight
“Love is Eternal Sacred Light” is as catchy as Simon’s music ever was.
 
Alison Krauss and Union Station - Paper Airplane - Rounder Records
It took a few years for Krauss and crew to craft something that they
apparantly felt would stand up to their 3-Grammy-winning 2004 release
(Lonely Runs Both Ways), but they’re back in full force with this one,
which showcases every facet of Krauss’ influences, from
Americana/roots/bluegrass music to country and pop. Krauss’ voice is a
consistent element throughout for the most part (three songs are sung by
Union Station’s Dan Tyminski), whether on the pensive “Lie Awake,” the
serene “Dimming of the Day,” and the slightly darker “Sinking Stone.” It’s
nothing particularly groundbreaking, but a consistent, strong, and
appealing set of tunes.
 

Alexander - Alexander - Vagrant
Alexander Ebert - otherwise known as the frontman for indie band Edward
Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros - steps out as a solo artist for the first
time on this set, which features ten songs that Ebert wrote, performed,
and recorded entirely by himself, solely on guitar, organ, violin,
clarinet, and his vocals. Reminiscent of the simpler, candy-coated songs
of the ’60s, these are appealing numbers for the most part, and slightly
more in-depth than the songs of that earlier era - “Glimpses” is a pretty,
soul-inflected number, while “In the Twilight” is a deeper mediation on
life happenings; the highlight may be “Million Years” with its unexpected
hook.
 
Robbie Robertson - How to Become Clairvoyant - 429 Records
Robertson’s fifth solo album sees the guitarist bringing in a colony of
heavy-hitters for his first album in over a decade, including Eric
Clapton, Robert Randolph, Tom Morello, Steve Winwood, and Trent Reznor,
plus production by Marius de Vries. Heavy on retro-rock and various (if
obvious) guitar variations, this is more mainstream than Robertson’s
previous recent-ish efforts, and includes the heavy attackers “Straight
Down the Line” and “He Don’t Live Here No More” for starters (complete
with Clapton on backing vox); diversions from the rockers include the
atmospheric title track, and closer “Tango for Django” with its
instrumental flair.
 

 
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