Letters

Letters 07-25-2016

Remember Bush-Cheney Does anyone remember George W. Bush and Dick Cheney? They were president and vice president a mere eight years ago. Does anyone out there remember the way things were at the end of their duo? It was terrible...

Mass Shootings And Gun Control The largest mass shooting in U.S. history occurred December 29,1890, when 297 Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in South Dakota were murdered by federal agents and members of the 7th Cavalry who had come to confiscate their firearms “for their own safety and protection.” The slaughter began after the majority of the Sioux had peacefully turned in their firearms...

Families Need Representation When one party dominates the Michigan administration and legislature, half of Michigan families are not represented on the important issues that face our state. When a policy affects the non-voting K-12 students, they too are left out, especially when it comes to graduation requirements...

Raise The Minimum Wage I wanted to offer a different perspective on the issue of raising the minimum wage. The argument that raising the minimum wage will result in job loss is a bogus scare tactic. The need for labor will not change, just the cost of it, which will be passed on to the consumer, as it always has...

Make Cherryland Respect Renewable Cherryland Electric is about to change their net metering policy. In a nutshell, they want to buy the electricity from those of us who produce clean renewable electric at a rate far below the rate they buy electricity from other sources. They believe very few people have an interest in renewable energy...

Settled Science Climate change science is based on the accumulated evidence gained from studying the greenhouse effect for 200 years. The greenhouse effect keeps our planet 50 degrees warmer due to heat-trapping gases in our atmosphere. Basic principles of physics and chemistry dictate that Earth will warm as concentrations of greenhouse gases increase...

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4Play: Paul Simon, Alison Krauss & Union Station, Alexander, Robbie Robertson

Kristi Kates - April 18th, 2011
Paul Simon - So Beautiful, So What - Hear Music
Simon returns with some of his best music since back in the Graceland
days, featuring an emotional range of new songs fully graced (ahem) with
diverse worldbeat instrumentations pinned to intelligent-folk roots. With
vocals barely aged even as Simon approaches 70 years old, he crafts smart
storytelling vehicles via music that beckon the ear and spark discussion.
“Questions for the Angels” harkens empathy for the homeless through one of
Simon’s trademark ballads; “The Afterlife” throws a bit of humor into the
mix; “Dazzling Blue” mixes exotic percussion and fiddle; and highlight
“Love is Eternal Sacred Light” is as catchy as Simon’s music ever was.
 
Alison Krauss and Union Station - Paper Airplane - Rounder Records
It took a few years for Krauss and crew to craft something that they
apparantly felt would stand up to their 3-Grammy-winning 2004 release
(Lonely Runs Both Ways), but they’re back in full force with this one,
which showcases every facet of Krauss’ influences, from
Americana/roots/bluegrass music to country and pop. Krauss’ voice is a
consistent element throughout for the most part (three songs are sung by
Union Station’s Dan Tyminski), whether on the pensive “Lie Awake,” the
serene “Dimming of the Day,” and the slightly darker “Sinking Stone.” It’s
nothing particularly groundbreaking, but a consistent, strong, and
appealing set of tunes.
 

Alexander - Alexander - Vagrant
Alexander Ebert - otherwise known as the frontman for indie band Edward
Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros - steps out as a solo artist for the first
time on this set, which features ten songs that Ebert wrote, performed,
and recorded entirely by himself, solely on guitar, organ, violin,
clarinet, and his vocals. Reminiscent of the simpler, candy-coated songs
of the ’60s, these are appealing numbers for the most part, and slightly
more in-depth than the songs of that earlier era - “Glimpses” is a pretty,
soul-inflected number, while “In the Twilight” is a deeper mediation on
life happenings; the highlight may be “Million Years” with its unexpected
hook.
 
Robbie Robertson - How to Become Clairvoyant - 429 Records
Robertson’s fifth solo album sees the guitarist bringing in a colony of
heavy-hitters for his first album in over a decade, including Eric
Clapton, Robert Randolph, Tom Morello, Steve Winwood, and Trent Reznor,
plus production by Marius de Vries. Heavy on retro-rock and various (if
obvious) guitar variations, this is more mainstream than Robertson’s
previous recent-ish efforts, and includes the heavy attackers “Straight
Down the Line” and “He Don’t Live Here No More” for starters (complete
with Clapton on backing vox); diversions from the rockers include the
atmospheric title track, and closer “Tango for Django” with its
instrumental flair.
 

 
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