Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Art · Rick Daigh
. . . .

Rick Daigh

Al Parker - June 13th, 2011
Rick Daigh: Painter aims for ‘a bit of an edge’
By Al Parker
Gaze on the evocative works of Rick Daigh and you might wonder who his
early artistic inspirations were.
The Old Masters? Perhaps the Impressionists?
“When I was about 9 years old, I got Mad Magazine,” he says with a wry
smile. “My heroes were those artists – Jack Davis, Wally Wood, Mort
Drucker. I loved those guys. By the time I was in high school, I wanted to
be an illustrator.”
After a year and a half as nt art major at Sacramento City College and a
tour of duty in the U.S. Air Force, Daigh found work at a number of print
shops and ad agencies in Southern California. He gradually got more
art-related jobs, working as a cartoonist at a greeting card company and
for several design studios where his detailed illustrations were featured
on brochures, print ads and publications.

MAKING A MOVE
After 20 years in California, in 1992 Daigh, his wife Barbara, a talented
artist in her own right, and their sons moved to Traverse City, Barbara’s
hometown. Working each day in SoCal as a full-time illustrator, Daigh had
little creative energy left over for more creative painting until he made
the move to Northern Michigan.
“I really didn’t accumulate much work of my own til I got to Traverse
City,” he says. “The first painting I sold in TC was at the Medici Gallery
on Front Street.”
Eventually word got out about Daigh’s compelling works at the Medici,
attracting the attention of at least one visiting celebrity. “I sold one
of mine, a city scene, to the comedian Gallagher,” he says. “He was
walking through there (the gallery) and liked it. I never met him, but I
understand it’s hanging over his fireplace at his home on Lake Tahoe.”
Daigh’s works are often nostalgic, dappled with a sense of romance. He
doesn’t like to name his works, letting the viewer use imagination to
unlock the story behind the painting.
“I like to think my works have a bit of an edge,” he explains. “They’re
more than just a landscape over the fireplace.”
Whether a wistful likeness, a provocative African scene or a light-hearted
‘50s city streetscape, his projects are almost always done in oils. “A lot
of my favorite illustrators worked in oil,” he explains. “Oil has the most
weight to it. Oil and real turpentine, which is getting harder to get,
gives me the wash affect I like most.”

EXHIBITS:
Daigh’s paintings can be seen at the Kuhlhaus Gallery in Harbor Springs
and in Traverse City at Gallery 50 and The Good Work Collective. In May,
several of his diminutive works were included in the Small Works Sale at
the Dennos Museum in Traverse City.
The Daigh family features three generations of artists. Rick’s father,
Marvin, earned a fine arts degree from the University of Illinois. Unable
to find work, he opted for a military career. Rick’s son, Eric, has earned
wide acclaim for his compelling portraits with push pins and duct tape.
Some 15 years ago, Daigh began working at Britten Banner. He’s still there
as a graphic designer. “I love my job at Britten,” he says. “It’s very
fulfilling.”
Despite his workload at Britten, Daigh still finds time to paint,
sometimes having several works going at once.
“I’m not really a prolific painter,” he explains. “When they’re ready,
they’re ready. Every one of them is a labor of love.”

 
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