Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Rick Daigh
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Rick Daigh

Al Parker - June 13th, 2011
Rick Daigh: Painter aims for ‘a bit of an edge’
By Al Parker
Gaze on the evocative works of Rick Daigh and you might wonder who his
early artistic inspirations were.
The Old Masters? Perhaps the Impressionists?
“When I was about 9 years old, I got Mad Magazine,” he says with a wry
smile. “My heroes were those artists – Jack Davis, Wally Wood, Mort
Drucker. I loved those guys. By the time I was in high school, I wanted to
be an illustrator.”
After a year and a half as nt art major at Sacramento City College and a
tour of duty in the U.S. Air Force, Daigh found work at a number of print
shops and ad agencies in Southern California. He gradually got more
art-related jobs, working as a cartoonist at a greeting card company and
for several design studios where his detailed illustrations were featured
on brochures, print ads and publications.

After 20 years in California, in 1992 Daigh, his wife Barbara, a talented
artist in her own right, and their sons moved to Traverse City, Barbara’s
hometown. Working each day in SoCal as a full-time illustrator, Daigh had
little creative energy left over for more creative painting until he made
the move to Northern Michigan.
“I really didn’t accumulate much work of my own til I got to Traverse
City,” he says. “The first painting I sold in TC was at the Medici Gallery
on Front Street.”
Eventually word got out about Daigh’s compelling works at the Medici,
attracting the attention of at least one visiting celebrity. “I sold one
of mine, a city scene, to the comedian Gallagher,” he says. “He was
walking through there (the gallery) and liked it. I never met him, but I
understand it’s hanging over his fireplace at his home on Lake Tahoe.”
Daigh’s works are often nostalgic, dappled with a sense of romance. He
doesn’t like to name his works, letting the viewer use imagination to
unlock the story behind the painting.
“I like to think my works have a bit of an edge,” he explains. “They’re
more than just a landscape over the fireplace.”
Whether a wistful likeness, a provocative African scene or a light-hearted
‘50s city streetscape, his projects are almost always done in oils. “A lot
of my favorite illustrators worked in oil,” he explains. “Oil has the most
weight to it. Oil and real turpentine, which is getting harder to get,
gives me the wash affect I like most.”

Daigh’s paintings can be seen at the Kuhlhaus Gallery in Harbor Springs
and in Traverse City at Gallery 50 and The Good Work Collective. In May,
several of his diminutive works were included in the Small Works Sale at
the Dennos Museum in Traverse City.
The Daigh family features three generations of artists. Rick’s father,
Marvin, earned a fine arts degree from the University of Illinois. Unable
to find work, he opted for a military career. Rick’s son, Eric, has earned
wide acclaim for his compelling portraits with push pins and duct tape.
Some 15 years ago, Daigh began working at Britten Banner. He’s still there
as a graphic designer. “I love my job at Britten,” he says. “It’s very
Despite his workload at Britten, Daigh still finds time to paint,
sometimes having several works going at once.
“I’m not really a prolific painter,” he explains. “When they’re ready,
they’re ready. Every one of them is a labor of love.”

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