Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Art · Rick Daigh
. . . .

Rick Daigh

Al Parker - June 13th, 2011
Rick Daigh: Painter aims for ‘a bit of an edge’
By Al Parker
Gaze on the evocative works of Rick Daigh and you might wonder who his
early artistic inspirations were.
The Old Masters? Perhaps the Impressionists?
“When I was about 9 years old, I got Mad Magazine,” he says with a wry
smile. “My heroes were those artists – Jack Davis, Wally Wood, Mort
Drucker. I loved those guys. By the time I was in high school, I wanted to
be an illustrator.”
After a year and a half as nt art major at Sacramento City College and a
tour of duty in the U.S. Air Force, Daigh found work at a number of print
shops and ad agencies in Southern California. He gradually got more
art-related jobs, working as a cartoonist at a greeting card company and
for several design studios where his detailed illustrations were featured
on brochures, print ads and publications.

MAKING A MOVE
After 20 years in California, in 1992 Daigh, his wife Barbara, a talented
artist in her own right, and their sons moved to Traverse City, Barbara’s
hometown. Working each day in SoCal as a full-time illustrator, Daigh had
little creative energy left over for more creative painting until he made
the move to Northern Michigan.
“I really didn’t accumulate much work of my own til I got to Traverse
City,” he says. “The first painting I sold in TC was at the Medici Gallery
on Front Street.”
Eventually word got out about Daigh’s compelling works at the Medici,
attracting the attention of at least one visiting celebrity. “I sold one
of mine, a city scene, to the comedian Gallagher,” he says. “He was
walking through there (the gallery) and liked it. I never met him, but I
understand it’s hanging over his fireplace at his home on Lake Tahoe.”
Daigh’s works are often nostalgic, dappled with a sense of romance. He
doesn’t like to name his works, letting the viewer use imagination to
unlock the story behind the painting.
“I like to think my works have a bit of an edge,” he explains. “They’re
more than just a landscape over the fireplace.”
Whether a wistful likeness, a provocative African scene or a light-hearted
‘50s city streetscape, his projects are almost always done in oils. “A lot
of my favorite illustrators worked in oil,” he explains. “Oil has the most
weight to it. Oil and real turpentine, which is getting harder to get,
gives me the wash affect I like most.”

EXHIBITS:
Daigh’s paintings can be seen at the Kuhlhaus Gallery in Harbor Springs
and in Traverse City at Gallery 50 and The Good Work Collective. In May,
several of his diminutive works were included in the Small Works Sale at
the Dennos Museum in Traverse City.
The Daigh family features three generations of artists. Rick’s father,
Marvin, earned a fine arts degree from the University of Illinois. Unable
to find work, he opted for a military career. Rick’s son, Eric, has earned
wide acclaim for his compelling portraits with push pins and duct tape.
Some 15 years ago, Daigh began working at Britten Banner. He’s still there
as a graphic designer. “I love my job at Britten,” he says. “It’s very
fulfilling.”
Despite his workload at Britten, Daigh still finds time to paint,
sometimes having several works going at once.
“I’m not really a prolific painter,” he explains. “When they’re ready,
they’re ready. Every one of them is a labor of love.”

 
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