Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Music · Soul Patch
. . . .

Soul Patch

Kristi Kates - June 13th, 2011
“Soul Patch has been a long and interesting journey,” begins Soul Patch singer Christopher “Wink” Winkelmann. The band, a Traverse City hometown favorite, began as a two-piece acoustic act made up of Winkelmann and Michael “Mando” Peck (on guitar and mandolin), and evolved into a two-piece with a whole lot of guest musicians sitting in.
“We are still in TC and probably always will be. This is our home and we love ‘Da Mitten!’” Winkelmann says.
By 2003, they’d added Christopher “CB” Belanger on bass; 2005 brought multi-instrumentalist Adam T. Sleder to the lineup along with Marc “Animal” Alderman on drums, and the official lineup of Soul Patch was “formed and complete on New Year’s Eve 2005,” Winkelmann confirms.
Soul Patch will lay down the grooves at the Northern Express Minifest this Thursday, June 16 from 7-9 p.m. at Lay Park (just south of the Union Street dam & bridge).  The public is encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs to the family-friendly show, which is co-sponsored by the Traverse City Parks & Recreation Commission.
 
SOUL OF A SOUND
While Soul Patch’s sound seems like something that was carefully crafted to cover several genres, the eclectic mix, Winkelmann explains, evolved naturally following his own solo work, during which he performed both covers and originals. Working with his bandmates, he found that they had similar styles and approaches to crafting music, which just made Soul Patch’s evolution all the easier.
“We all have a love for all music,” he says, “with no one genre taking over our everyday lives. We are always listening, respecting, and gaining new musical bliss through the vast connections we all make as musicians.
“So, in writing new music one of the three songwriters brings a riff or a song to practice. We all give it a listen, and see if we can make it work with our many different styles. We’ll ‘put some Patch on it!’ - meaning we’ll all produce our own parts to the song - and put them together until it seems to work for our ears. That’s how we ‘settled’ on our sound.”

NO SET LISTS, PLEASE 
While they’re often referred to as a jam band or a party band, Winkelmann says that “if you love music, chances are you’ll like Soul Patch.” 
Their mix of styles can be heard within the range of just one song. And speaking of set lists - Soul Patch doesn’t believe in ‘em, so don’t expect to see the same show twice.
“I get asked a lot why we don’t make set lists,” Winkelmann says, “basically, I developed this philosophy years ago as a solo artist. I was in bands that would write set lists, and I was the front man, having to sing the list and see the crowd’s reactions to the songs and hear their requests. What I found was that the more I pay attention as an entertainer, reading the crowd the best I can from stage, it gives me the ability to keep the floor moving and the crowd interacting.”
“By not writing a set list, I can fulfill requests, interact with the audience more, and make them feel like they are involved in the show, not there to just hear my agenda for the evening. And for us as a band, it keeps every evening different and fresh. In the life of Soul Patch, you never know what is going to happen,” he says.

A NEW ALBUM SPINS
That approach extends to the life of their recording career, as well. A new CD from the band has been long-awaited and much-anticipated - but as Winkelmann explains, even the best made plans don’t always necessarily work out in time.
“In July of 2007, we put out a live CD which we recorded in the studio, live in one take, with little to no editing, and we gave it to our fans, as they requested,” Winkelmann says. “Over the past four years, many have asked us when we were going to have a new CD. Well, it was supposed to be late 2008, then early 2009, then 2010 - but it is actually being mastered as we are having this interview,” he chuckles.
The new 14-track, original album, titled S.P.i.N., is now set to be out in early to mid June.
“If it’s possible, we may leak one new tune off of the album to WNMC 90.7 FM once the album is mastered,” Winkelmann says, “but I make no promises when it comes to this album - it was supposed to be out three years ago.”

Soul Patch performs at the Northern Express Minifest this Thursday from 7-9 p.m. at Lay Park (just south of the Union Street dam & bridge).  The free show celebrates 20 years of Northern Express.  Bring a lawn chair. For more on the band, see http://www.facebook.com/soulpatchisneat

 
 



 
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