Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Grandpa Shorter‘s
. . . .

Grandpa Shorter‘s

- June 13th, 2011
Petoskey’s most notable general store, Grandpa Shorter’s celebrates 65 years this summer with a walk down memory lane.
After WWII ended in 1945, entrepreneurs Carl (‘C.G.) and Ruth Shorter returned home to Petoskey from Detroit with the idea of opening a souvenir store downtown. In 1946, Carl began buying crafts from local Ottawa Indians (now also referred to as Odawa), making several trips over the winter to Cross Village to purchase goods for sale at the couple’s new shop.
The Shorters’ business began in a tiny 8’ wide by 24’ deep rented building and opened for their first customers on Memorial Day weekend in 1946. Little did they know that their first Memorial Day weekend would lead to 65 more Memorial Day weekends and  four generations of Shorters working in that same business, albeit a bit larger.
The store was a hit, selling locally crafted Native American items, such as quill boxes, ash baskets, bow and arrow sets, birch bark birdhouses and more. The store also sold deerskin gloves and jackets, Minnetonka Moccasins, pennants from the area and surrounding towns, birch candles, balsam fir pillows, incense and sterling silver jewelry.
By 1956, the Shorters moved out of their tiny space to bigger digs next door -- their present 301 E. Lake Street location -- a building that still oozes the atmosphere of an old time general store.  In 1998 the front of the building was taken back to the way it looked when originally constructed in 1881. It is a Mesker tin-faced building and is the oldest of its kind in Petoskey. 

MOVING ON
In a news release from the family, Jennifer Shorter, third-generation proprietor, credits the success of the business to “hard-work and great customers who keep coming back.” The store has repeatedly won awards for the Best Gift Store in Northern Michigan from publications including Northern Express and Traverse Magazine.
Jennifer grew up in the family business. She would come to the store after school and, at $2 an hour, earn spending money by emptying garbage cans, marking product, and vacuuming. She left after high school to attend the University of Michigan.  After college and a brief stint in corporate America, Jennifer returned to the family business and has never looked back. 
To commemorate their 65th anniversary, Grandpa Shorter’s recently installed a penny press machine for the enjoyment of their guests. 
“This is the first and only penny press machine in Petoskey, and there are four designs that reflect the history of Petoskey, from a drawing of our building, our million dollar sunset and break-wall, Gaslights, and the Petoskey Stone, all rendered on your penny,” Shorter said.
Grandpa Shorter’s has also installed a wall of history inside the store, showcasing photos of generations of the family and the store’s progress through the years.
When the store turned 60, in 2006, Grandpa Shorter’s installed a mural, painted by Terry Dickinson, on the cement wall that overlooks Shopper’s Lane behind the store. Due to leakage behind the mural, Grandpa Shorter’s is going to have to have it repainted. The repaint of the mural will be changed to more accurately reflect the four generations and their contributions to the store’s history. The mural will be installed this summer.

Grandpa Shorter’s is located at 301 E. Lake Street, in Petoskey’s historic gaslight district. Additional information about the store and upcoming events are available at www.grandpashorters.com.
 
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