Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Random Thoughts · Paying for that vacation...
. . . .

Paying for that vacation ...

Robert Downes - July 4th, 2011
Paying for that Vacation...
Since there will be upwards of 500,000 people in town for the National Cherry Festival this week, this seems a likely time to talk about how to pay for that vacation you‘ve been dreaming of all year.
How can one afford to travel up north for a week of carnival rides, hotels at premium rates, wine tours and dinners by the Bay? Not to mention expensive destinations all over the world?
Easy: save your money.
Okay, that seems like a no-brainer, but most of us have a tough time saving for college tuition or a new car, much less a ‘frivolous’ vacation. The most common complaint I hear from my non-traveling friends is that they “can‘t afford to go anywhere.“
Translation: they failed to plan for one of the most soul-nourishing events you can do for yourself and your family each year.
Those who do bite the bullet and go on vacation anyway often ‘put it on the card,‘ creating an unhappy post-trip experience for the payee, much like when the Christmas credit card bills come rolling in come January.
But if travel, a family vacation, and having a wealth of experiences is a bigger priority than being a slave to a big mortgage or a car payment, there is a way to get ‘er done.
Consider a simple investment strategy called ‘pay yourself first‘ to save for your next vacation.
Just as you might ‘pay yourself first‘ by having some portion of your paycheck deducted straight into your 401k plan, so too can you save for the trip of your dreams.
The idea is to establish a set amount of money to save from each pay period come hell or high water. These funds go into a separate checking account, and it’s quite pleasant to watch them pile up as the months go by. It‘s a variation on the old Christmas Club plans that banks used to offer to help you save for the holidays.
By ‘paying yourself first‘ you never miss the funds because they’re not a consideration for getting by. They go straight to the bank and you live on what’s left over.
But what happens if your car breaks down or you need a new furnace?
Tough beans -- you can’t touch that vacation fund any more than you can access your 401k plan before retirement age.
Somehow, you will always find a way to pay for the endless stream of roadblocks that life throws at you -- the dental bills, the brake job, the leaky roof -- but you will seldom ever manage to adequately save for a travel adventure unless you have the steel to make it a priority.
A friend once dreamed of going to Paris on Bastille Day to celebrate his 50th birthday. He talked about making the trip for several years in advance, but his birthday rolled around without any savings in his travel piggy bank. It would have been a simple matter to have saved $10 per week for a couple of years and -- voila! wine & crepes by the Seine -- but as it turned out, he never made the trip.
Even a small amount of weekly savings can add up to a great vacation. Just saving your daily pocket change each day adds up to several hundred dollars over a year’s time.
Of course, the ‘pay yourself first‘ strategy is a dud if you are addicted to credit cards and auto loans. The only trip you take when you go into the consumer lifestyle of debt is deeper in the hole.
We‘ve all been suckered by the temptation of easy credit in America, but the hard lesson here is that inevitably, debt puts you in a ‘pay yourself last‘ situation.
It‘s all a matter of perspective and what you value in life. When I see a sign at an auto lot that says, “Only $369 per month,“ I don‘t see a happy ride down the highway of success -- instead, I see a round-trip airfare to San Francisco, Florida, Cancun or New York going down the drain month after month for five years with nothing to show for it when the loan is paid except for the need for another loan.
There‘s a solution for this one too: ‘pay yourself first‘ by saving a small amount each week for your next vehicle as well as your vacation or the kids‘ college fund. You will go much further in the long run, my friend.
See you at the Cherry Festival.

Downes‘ new ebook, Planet Backpacker: The Good Life Bumming Around the World, with more than 75 color photos is now available on Kindle at amazon.com and on Apple iBooks.
 
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