Letters

Letters 11-28-2016

Trump should avoid self-dealing President-elect Donald Trump plans to turn over running of The Trump Organization to his children, who are also involved in the transition and will probably be informal advisers during his administration. This is not a “blind trust.” In this scenario Trump and family could make decisions based on what’s best for them rather than what’s best for the country...

Trump the change we need?  I have had a couple of weeks to digest the results of this election and reflect. There is no way the selection of Trump as POTUS could ever come close to being normal. It is not normal to have a president-elect settle a fraud case for millions a couple of months before the inauguration. It is not normal to have racists considered for cabinet posts. It is not normal for a president-elect tweet outrageous comments on his Twitter feed to respond to supposed insults at all hours of the early morning...

Health care system should benefit all It is no secret that the health insurance situation in our country is controversial. Some say the Affordable Care Act is “the most terrible thing that has happened to our country in years”; others are thrilled that, “for the first time in years I can get and afford health insurance.” Those who have not been closely involved in the medical field cannot be expected to understand how precarious the previous medical insurance structure was...

Christmas tradition needs change The Christmas light we need most is the divine, and to receive it we do not need electricity, probably only prayers and good deeds. But not everyone has this understanding, as we see in the energy waste that follows with the Christmas decorations...

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS 

A story in last week’s edition about parasailing businesses on East Grand Traverse Bay mistakenly described Grand Traverse Parasail as a business that is affiliated with the ParkShore Resort. It operates from a beach club two doors down from the resort. The story also should have noted that prior to the filing of a civil lawsuit in federal court by Saburi Boyer and Traverse Bay Parasail against Bryan Punturo and the ParkShore Resort, a similar lawsuit was dismissed from 13th Circuit Court in Traverse City upon a motion from the defendant’s attorney. Express regrets the error and omission.

A story in last week’s edition about The Fillmore restaurant in Manistee misstated Jacob Slonecki’s job at Arcadia Bluffs Golf Course. He was a cook. Express regrets the error.

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H.O.P.E. for pets and their owners

Erin Crowell - July 4th, 2011
H.O.P.E. for Pets and their Owners
By Erin Crowell
These days, people can’t afford to keep their pets – a reality that happens in Northern Michigan and across the country every day due to a bad economy.
The Cherryland Humane Society managed to keep its doors open this June, thanks to a community effort of donations and fundraisers that helped counter a $20,000-per-month budget shortfall discovered by the organization in May.
While annual donations for the Traverse City shelter have been down, animal drop-off numbers are up – a record number due to job losses and foreclosures in the area, according to Jess Reed, CHS president.
According to the ASPCA, annual costs for a medium-size dog averages $695; a cat totals $670; even a small bird costs $200 per year.
Now consider a home with multiple pets.
While it’s responsible to drop off a pet at a shelter rather than denying its needs, the process is painful – heartbreaking for most owners who have found love, companionship and even a family member through pet ownership.
“I thought, ‘gosh, how terrible would it be having to give up a pet?’ My pets are like my children and I couldn’t think of not helping them,” said Susan Reabe, founder and president of Helping Owners With Pet Expenses (H.O.P.E.), a Traverse City-based non-profit that assists pet owners with food and vet expenses.

PET PANTRY
Before Reabe established H.O.P.E. in February, she made the decision to bake dog cookies and sell them in return for pet food to donate to pet owners who were faced with giving up their animals because of financial burdens.
“To date, we’ve probably helped 35 owners with vet bills and, oh gosh, a lot more with food,” Reabe said about the young organization’s progress.
H.O.P.E works with several area veterinary offices, receiving discounts on medical procedures, including Bay Area Pet Hospital on Front Street, which is also the location of their pet food pantry.
“Bay Area lets us use a room in the lower level of their building,” said Reabe, a retired registered nurse who is married to a local veterinarian.
Because the organization is still in its infancy, Reabe said they only assist pet owners of small animals, which run the gamut from dogs, cats and birds to guinea pigs, ferrets and lizards.
Food assistance is open to residents of Grand Traverse County only; however, H.O.P.E. will also accept applications from Benzie, Leelanau, Kalkaska, Antrim and Wexford regarding vet care.
Pet owners fill out an application stating their financial status and whether they need assistance with food or a vet bill. They receive assistance based on their individual need.
“We look at everything on a case-by-case basis,” said Reabe. “We don’t really have a time frame. For food we will help usually three to five months and have them reapply – generally until they can get back on their feet.”

ANOTHER OPTION
“The people who are seeking help are very grateful. A gal had a dog with infected ears. They had four kids and were a working family and were still barely able to make ends meet. It was so bad, they either had to put the dog down or give it away to a shelter,” said Reabe, who added they were able to help the family keep their pet.
Nikki White was referred to H.O.P.E. by Bay Area Pet Hospital after her six-year-old dog, a greyhound/shepard/lab mix named Skyler, needed surgery for a uterine infection – a procedure that costs $300.
“I can’t work because of disability and my fiancé is the only one supporting us,” White said about her family that includes two children and two dogs.
White filled out an application, with H.O.P.E. covering the cost of surgery.
“It would have been very, very difficult. I would have had to give her up,” said White. “ She’s one of the best dogs that anyone could ask for. Even people who don’t like dogs say they love her.”
So far, the response from the community has been very positive, said Reabe.
“We recently had a fundraiser and raised close to $4,000. Most of our food is donated by Square Deal Country Store and McGough’s of Traverse City. If they have nearly-expired food or a bag is ripped, they can’t sell it. They’ve donated pallets of food to us.”
Several pet owners who have used H.O.P.E have either volunteered their own services or say they will donate as soon as they’re back on their feet. However, Reabe adds the organization is still in need of a treasurer and project manager in order to keep moving forward.

If you are interested in volunteering for H.O.P.E., the next open meeting will be held Wednesday, July 13, at 5:30 p.m., in the lower level of the Bay Area Pet Hospital. It is a potluck event. Pet food and kitty litter may be dropped off directly to Bay Area Pet Hospital (located at 844 E. Front Street in Traverse City). More information on H.O.P.E. may be found at helpingownerswithpetexpenses.com.
 
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