Letters

Letters 09-26-2016

Welcome To 1984 The Democrat Party, the government education complex, private corporations and foundations, the news media and the allpervasive sports and entertainment industry have incrementally repressed the foundational right of We the People to publicly debate open borders, forced immigration, sanctuary cities and the calamitous destruction of innate gender norms...

Grow Up, Kachadurian Apparently Tom Kachadurian has great words; too bad they make little sense. His Sept. 19 editorial highlights his prevalent beliefs that only Hillary and the Dems are engaged in namecalling and polarizing actions. Huh? What rock does he live under up on Old Mission...

Facts MatterThomas Kachadurian’s “In the Basket” opinion deliberately chooses to twist what Clinton said. He chooses to argue that her basket lumped all into the clearly despicable categories of the racist, sexist, homophobic , etc. segments of the alt right...

Turn Off Fox, Kachadurian I read Thomas Kachadurian’s opinion letter in last week’s issue. It seemed this opinion was the product of someone who offered nothing but what anyone could hear 24/7/365 on Fox News; a one-sided slime job that has been done better by Fox than this writer every day of the year...

Let’s Fix This Political Process Enough! We have been embroiled in the current election cycle for…well, over a year, or is it almost two? What is the benefit of this insanity? Exorbitant amounts of money are spent, candidates are under the microscope day and night, the media – now in action 24/7 – focuses on anything and everything anyone does, and then analyzes until the next event, and on it goes...

Can’t Cut Taxes 

We are in a different place today. The slogan, “Making America Great Again” begs the questions, “great for whom?” and “when was it great?” I have claimed my generation has lived in a bubble since WWII, which has offered a prosperity for a majority of the people. The bubble has burst over the last few decades. The jobs which provided a good living for people without a college degree are vanishing. Unions, which looked out for the welfare of employees, have been shrinking. Businesses have sought to produce goods where labor is not expensive...

Wrong About Clinton In response to Thomas Kachadurian’s column, I have to take issue with many of his points. First, his remarks about Ms. Clinton’s statement regarding Trump supporters was misleading. She was referring to a large segment of his supporters, not all. And the sad fact is that her statement was not a “smug notion.” Rather, it was the sad truth, as witnessed by the large turnout of new voters in the primaries and the ugly incidents at so many of his rallies...

Home · Articles · News · Books · TC, I Love Thee
. . . .

TC, I Love Thee

Elizabeth Buzzelli - August 15th, 2011
TC, I Love Thee
By Henry Morgenstein
Between the Bays Publishing
$16.99

By Elizabeth Buzzelli

The Traverse City Chamber of Commerce should be handing out Henry
Morgenstein’s new book, “TC, I Love Thee,” to every tourist and
prospective resident. Real Estate agents should buy cases of the books to
give as gifts at closings. If you would like to join in a song to our
beautiful area, this is that song.
Henry Morgenstein came to the United States in 1948 when he was brought to
New York City from first Belgium, and then Havana, Cuba. In 1971 he moved
to Traverse City, teaching English at Northwestern Michigan College for
the next 30 years until his retirement in 2001.
This man loves Traverse City: unequivocally, unapologetically,
wholeheartedly. He loves the area, the people, the houses, downtown, the
lake. For years he’s fought for a sensible future, argued for sustainable
growth, for using our resources to the best advantage, for preservation of
our buildings, and for holding on to the unique character of the town.

COLUMN COLLECTION
After he came to TC, he was soon writing letters to the editor of the
Record-Eagle, then eventually writing a column for the paper. After that
came talks on various radio stations, including WNMC, Northwestern
Michigan College’s radio station. It is these letters, essays, radio
talks, and columns that are collected here, in this book. All with a
common theme: the city that he loves. In “Traverse City is as close as I
can come to paradise on Earth” (written in 1990) he recalls the dark
tunnels of New York City.
“I lived in apartment 6C in New York City,” he writes. “A nice building
at the very uppermost tip of the island of Manhattan. When I left my
apartment to go anywhere I stepped outside my apartment, made sure the
door was locked, walked through a dreary tunnel (long hallway) to a dank
cave (elevator)…”
But here, in the city he’s come to love, “I bicycle down Washington
Street, State Street, Eighth Street. I bicycle all over town… What
unbelievable peace and quiet reigns in this small town… Traverse City, you
are close to my ideal city. How did I get so lucky?”

PUBLIC PITCH
Never a man to steer away from controversy, one of the most telling
exchanges in the book comes when the then-editor of the Record Eagle, Jim
Herman, left it up to the readership, whether Henry should be given a
regular column or not. Morgenstein, in his own defense, wrote “I think I
am good at writing. I think I am good at clarifying an issue, at raising
the various points that need to be raised. I write to make all of us
aware of certain human issues—pollution, overpopulation—local
issues—school buses—city streets…” He included a coupon to vote yes or no
for him. Over 300 people voted and he got his column, until 1991, when he
was fired for opposing the first invasion of Iraq.
One of his essays, about saving the beautiful buildings of the old state
hospital, reads almost like prophecy. Although his dream of locating the
college at the hospital site never materialized, many of his other wishes
for the property have come true. At first, he envisioned the plan of the
Palais Royal in Paris, designed in 1790:
“It included an exquisite theatre, a puppet show, a waxwork, and a theatre
in which child actors performed. There were auction rooms, concert rooms,
a salon for chess players, gambling clubs, purely social clubs, a Turkish
bath, apartments to rent, several small hotels, numerous cafes and eating
places. The upper floors were rented out.”
So, maybe some of that is still to come but he did describe great
restaurants locating there . . . “Some posh apartment buildings. A
building with specialty shops.”
Not bad. He suggested that the site become Traverse City’s Central Park;
that the zoo be moved to the grounds; and that cars be banned in the area.
Some of that could still be in the future as the property defines itself.
It might yet be Traverse City’s Central Park, cars might still be confined
to the outer perimeters, and maybe the zoo animals we lost will wend their
way back.

BIKES & CARS
A bit of a renegade, Henry Morgenstein is definitely not a lover of
cars. In “TC should walk into the future,” he champions walking or
biking as the sanest means of transportation. In a not so prophetic
pronouncement, he says in this 1986 essay, “Cars are not the wave of
the future.” If he had his way, he would ban cars from almost all of
the city, compelling residents to ride a bike as he does. A common
sight in Traverse City was Henry on his bike, greeting neighbors and
visitors. A one-man welcoming committee for the city he loves.
Perhaps my favorite lines from this book of elegiac, contentious, and
thought provoking essays comes in “Ban all cars inside Traverse City” when
he writes:
“Ban all cars inside Traverse City. When you get to our city limit you
will please leave all guns, cars, and other mechanical noise-making
machines at our front door. Now you may enter our world of peace, quiet,
tranquility and children’s games.”
Well, maybe not during Cherry Festival, or the Film Festival, but it is
something to think about.

Elizabeth Kane Buzzelli will be talking about “Dogs, Logs, and Dead Folks”
at the Traverse City Library August 22, 7 pm. Her new mystery, “Dead Dogs
and Englishmen,” is in bookstores now.

 
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