Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

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Up in Smoke Court ruling puts pot purveyors out of business

Patrick Sullivan - August 29th, 2011
Up in Smoke: Court ruling puts pot purveyors out of business
By Patrick Sullivan
Owners of medical marijuana collectives decided not to wait for the police to knock on their doors following last week’s court decision that, for now, puts an end to legal patient-to-patient sales of pot.
“We’re just telling (our customers) that due to the recent government ruling, we’ve been advised by our attorney not to be transferring medicine period,” said Steve Ezell, an employee at the Collective, a marijuana shop on State Street in TC.
Pot shops across the state are in jeopardy after the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled Aug. 24 in favor of prosecutors in an Isabella County case and said the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act does not legalize the sale of marijuana for profit.
TC Police said they would look into the business practices at marijuana shops, but before they could, shops across town apparently closed.
That put around a dozen employees at the Collective out of work and left around 1,500 members who have a doctor’s prescription to use marijuana without a source for the drug.
The court ruling determined that the businesses are public nuisances and violate the state public health code, which is meant to protect citizens from hazards.
Ezell said he didn’t think the business he worked at ever posed a threat to the public. It opened last November.
“You’ll have to check with the Traverse City police, but I’m confident that there’s been zero incidents involving the Collective,” Ezell said.

Jesse Williams, a TC attorney who represents collectives, said he’s advising his clients it’s too risky to stay in business.
“The Court of Appeals made it clear that patient-to-patient transfer for compensation is not what was intended” in the Medical Marijuana Act, Williams said.
Williams believes a footnote in the decision leaves open the possibility that non-profits could open in the place of the businesses that just closed, but he believes eventually prosecutors and the courts might seek to close those also.
“It’s going to create a whole whirlwind of non-profits popping up now,” Williams said.
He said he thought the medical marijuana act was intended to make it possible for patients to get access to marijuana, and that’s what the collectives did. Now, some patients who don’t grow it themselves will be forced to go without marijuana or deal on the black market.
“It’s back to a free-for-all and to me that doesn’t make sense,” Williams said. “I don’t know why we are spending so much time and energy fighting something when the same amount of consumption is going to happen regardless.”

The decision, which took immediate effect, was praised by state Attorney General Bill Schuette.
“This ruling is a huge victory for public safety and Michigan communities struggling with an invasion of pot shops near their schools, homes and churches,” Schuette said in a press release. “Today the Court echoed the concerns of law enforcement, clarifying that this law is narrowly focused to help the seriously ill, not the creation of a marijuana free-for-all.”
Schuette said he would send a letter to each county prosecutor to explain how the decision empowers them to close medical marijuana shops.
The decision was signed by judges Joel P. Hoekstra, Christopher M. Murray, and Cynthia Diane Stephens.
“It’s a helpful opinion in that it gives people some guidance. Not everyone’s going to agree with it,” said Joseph Hubbell, prosecutor for Leelanau County, which until this week had one dispensary, the M-22 Collective in Elmwood Township.
M-22 had a sign posted Thursday saying they were closed.
Hubbell said he hasn’t decided whether to take action based on the ruling. He said he will have to see how the businesses respond to the new reality.
While there was only one marijuana business operating in Leelanau County, numerous townships were grappling with how to regulate proposed marijuana shops.

The business in Mt. Pleasant called Compassionate Apothecary (CA), whose case led to the decision, went to great lengths to avoid actually being in the business of buying and selling marijuana, according to the court decision.
Despite the measures, Isabella County prosecutors sought to prove CA operated outside of the bounds of the Medical Marijuana Act, and the court of appeals agreed.
CA’s goal was to provide an uninterrupted supply of marijuana to their patients by facilitating “patient-to-patient transfers,” according to the decision.
It made money by bringing together patients and caregivers who could then sell marijuana to each other.
They had around 345 members who paid $5 per month. The business also controlled 27 lockers it rented for $50 per month.
A patient could store 2.5 ounces of marijuana in their locker and if they had excess marijuana they could sell it to other patients. Caregivers could store up to 2.5 ounces for each of their patients.
A patient would show their Michigan Department of Community Healt-issued medical marijuana card and they would be taken to a display room where they could look at, touch and smell different strains of marijuana.
A patient could purchase up to two and a half ounces every two weeks. Owners set the price and CA collected 20 percent.
The business opened in May of 2010 and in the first two and a half months it sold 19 pounds of marijuana. Marijuana owners made around $79,000 and CA made around $21,000 in that time, according to the decision. CA also had outlets in Traverse City and Lansing.
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