Letters 11-23-2015

Cheering From Petoskey While red-eyed rats boil fanatically up from the ancient sewers of Paris to feast on pools of French blood, at the G20 meeting the farcical pied piper of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue thrusts a bony finger at the president of the Russian Federation and yells: “liberté, égalité, fraternité, Clinton, Kerry--Obamaism!”

The Other Mothers And Fathers Regarding the very nice recent article on “The First Lady of Yoga,” I have taken many classes with Sandy Carden, and I consider her to be a great teacher. However, I feel the article is remiss to not even give acknowledgement to other very important yoga influences in northern Michigan...

Drop The Blue Angels The last time I went to the National Cherry Festival, I picked the wrong day. The Blue Angels were forcing everyone to duck and cover from the earsplitting cacophony overhead...

Real Advice For The Sick In the Nov. 16 article “Flu Fighters,” author Kristi Kates fails to mention the most basic tool in our arsenal during Influenza season... the flu vaccine! I understand you might be afraid of being the victim of Jenny McCarthyism, but the science is there...

Keeping Traverse City in the Dark Our environment is our greatest asset. It sustains our lives; it drives our economy. We ignore it at our peril. Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) has submitted letters of concern to both the city commission and planning commission regarding the proposed 9-story buildings on Pine Street. We have requested an independent environmental assessment with clear answers before a land use permit is granted...

All About Them Another cartoon by Jen Sorensen that brings out the truth! Most of her cartoons are too slanted in a Socialist manner, but when she gets it correct, she hits the nail on the target! “Arizona is the first state to put a 12-month lifetime limit on welfare benefits.” That quote is in the opening panel... 

Unfair To County Employees It appears that the commissioners of Grand Traverse County will seek to remedy a shortfall in the 2016 budget by instituting cuts in expenditures, the most notable the reduction of contributions to various insurance benefits in place for county employees. As one example, the county’s contributions to health insurance premiums will decrease from ten to six percent in 2016. What this means, of course, is that if a county employee wishes to maintain coverage at the current level next year, the employee will have to come up with the difference...

Up, Not Out I would like to congratulate the Traverse City Planning Commission on their decision to approve the River West development. Traverse City will either grow up or grow out. For countless reasons, up is better than out. Or do we enjoy such things as traffic congestion and replacing wooded hillsides with hideous spectacles like the one behind Tom’s West Bay. At least that one is on the edge of town as opposed to in the formerly beautiful rolling meadows of Acme Township...

Lessons In Winning War I am saddened to hear the response of so many of legislators tasked with keeping our country safe. I listen and wonder if they know what “winning” this kind of conflict requires or even means? Did we win in Korea? Did we win in Vietnam? Are we winning in Afghanistan? How is Israel winning against the Palestinians? Will they “take out” Hezbollah...

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Mountain Biking Mackinac Find the ?real? island offroad on 2 wheels

Mike Terrell - August 29th, 2011
Mountain Biking Mackinac: Find the ‘real’ island offroad on 2 wheels
By Mike Terrell

It may be hard to think of Mackinac Island as a mountain biking destination when you think of the crowded village, fudge shops, horse traffic, and the flat, paved ride around the exterior of the island.
However, once you leave the village and climb up into the interior of the rock-bound island, beyond the fort and Arch Rock, the crowds and aroma of cooking fudge quickly disappear. You may see a horse-back rider, but they have their own set of forest trails. It’s a totally different look at this historic, hump-backed island.
After disembarking the boat head over to the island’s Chamber of Commerce information center located along the main street near the ferry docks and pick up a map of the island with all the interior trails. Most of the trails are marked with trail signs and are fairly easy to follow. You’ll see old stone walls and foundations, an old soldier’s garden area cleared in the late 1700s, Skull Cave, and little known treats like Cave-in-the-Woods and Crack-in-the-Island. I’ve found island residents that didn’t know these formations existed.

During the summer, ferry boats deposit thousands of visitors daily on the island, but you may encounter only a handful up in the forested interior. Most stay in the village area.
The first mile-and-a-half is paved along the eastern bluff of the island. Head up to Huron Road and follow it to Arch Rock and Leslie Avenue; a narrow strip of twisting pavement that hugs the bluff offering views of Lake Huron’s steely blue waters and more islands off in the distance. It’s a cruising delight.
Soon you encounter North Bicycle Trail heading off to the left and the off-road adventure begins. Follow it to Blodgett Trail and eventually head right on Soldier’s Garden Trail, which is a fun, rock-bound ride with dips and small jumps. In about a mile you cross Leslie Avenue and drop down onto Tranquil Bluff Trail, which rolls along a bluff above the north end of the island.
It meanders along the bluff for over a mile. Wild flowers abound along the trail and Lake Huron glimmers through the trees. Often you can hear flatlanders peddling along the paved road below as they circle the island. Along the way you pass Eagle Point Cave, marked on your map. Rocks, roots, and off-camber climbs and descents keep the peddling interesting.

About five miles into the ride Tranquil Bluff Trail drops down onto British Landing Road, which you follow south – back towards the village – for a short distance to Lydia Trail that exits right off the road. Follow a series of intersecting trails to access Cave-in-the-Woods and Crack-in-the-Island.
Lydia Trail crosses State Road and becomes Straits Trail. At the Y-intersection follow the left fork, this becomes Niki’s Trail. After a short distance it T’s with Partridge Trail. Go left and in a little over a half-mile you come to the two unusual geological formations.
Cave-in-the-Woods shows old lake lines when a great inland sea called Algonquin covered the present Great Lakes. Just in back of the cave is Crack-in-the-Island, a deep fissure in the island’s limestone base.
Continue on the single-track and exit back out onto State Road just north of the island’s airstrip. Turn right and follow it to British Landing Road. Cross it and follow Leslie Avenue for about a half-mile to Scott’s Trail. Follow the single-track south to Jupiter Trail, turn left and end up at the paved portion of North Bicycle Trail and Sugarloaf, a huge monolith rock, and Skull Cave. It is considered sacred by Native Americans. It’s a little over a mile back to the village.
While it may not be as spectacular or quite as isolated as Grand Island near Munising, the mountain biking on Mackinac Island is surprisingly rugged and pristine. Most visitors never see the “real” island.
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