Letters

Letters 08-03-2015

Real Brownfields Deserve Dollars I read with interest the story on Brownfield development dollars in the July 20 issue. I applaud Dan Lathrop and other county commissioners who voted “No” on the Randolph Street project...

Hopping Mad Carlin Smith is hopping mad (“Will You Get Mad With Me?” 7-20-15). Somebody filed a fraudulent return using his identity, and he’s not alone. The AP estimates the government “pays more than $5 billion annually in fraudulent tax refunds.” Well, many of us have been hopping mad for years. This is because the number one tool Congress has used to fix this problem has been to cut the IRS budget –by $1.2 billion in the last 5 years...

Just Grumbling, No Solutions Mark Pontoni’s grumblings [recent Northern Express column] tell us much about him and virtually nothing about those he chooses to denigrate. We do learn that Pontoni may be the perfect political candidate. He’s arrogant, opinionated and obviously dimwitted...

A Racist Symbol I have to respond to Gordon Lee Dean’s letter claiming that the confederate battle flag is just a symbol of southern heritage and should not be banned from state displays. The heritage it represents was the treasonous effort to continue slavery by seceding from a democratic nation unwilling to maintain such a consummate evil...

Not So Thanks I would like to thank the individual who ran into and knocked over my Triumph motorcycle while it was parked at Lowe’s in TC on Friday the 24th. The $3,000 worth of damage was greatly appreciated. The big dent in the gas tank under the completely destroyed chrome badge was an especially nice touch...

Home · Articles · News · Features · GLEN CAMPBELL
. . . .

GLEN CAMPBELL

Rick Coates - October 10th, 2011  
Says Goodbye

One of the ‘60s’ finest songwriters is battling Alzheimer’s disease, hanging on for a final tour.

We have heard before of “The Farewell Tour.” In fact some musicians have had more than one ‘we-are-alldone-touring’ tours. But more often than not, these tours turn out to be marketing ploys.

This past year Bob Seger announced in so many words that it is time for him to hang it up and pass the touring torch on to fellow Michiganders Kid Rock and Eminem. Speculation was that this past spring would be Seger’s last tour. But just a couple weeks ago Seger did an about-face and at the age of 66 he now feels energized by touring and plans to release a new album next spring and go on the road again.

For Glen Campbell, however, this will be his last tour. He also just released his final album. There is no turning back for Campbell, there is no changing his mind for future tours or albums. He has Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and is showing early signs of the disease in recent appearances.

Campbell will perform this Thursday (October 13) at the Dreammakers Theater at the Kewadin Casino in Sault Ste. Marie, his only scheduled Michigan date on his final tour.

A THANK YOU

This is not a “feel sorry” event for Glen Campbell. Instead Campbell wanted to say thank you to his fans for giving him a career that has spanned 50-plus years. Before becoming a country music legend, Campbell was a sought-after rock session musician and backing vocalist during the ’60s.

“Music is very therapeutic for those with Alzheimer’s,” said Kim Woollen Campbell, his wife of the past 30 years. “We learned about the Alzheimer’s nearly a year ago and we finally released it publicly this past June because I didn’t want people to think he was drunk on stage.”

Last spring a concert reviewer wrote, “Campbell seemed to not be prepared for his show, forgetting lyrics and repeating himself.” Yet despite being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, Campbell remains upbeat.

“There a lot of things from my past I didn’t want to remember anyway,” said Campbell. “My wife and kids are coming out on the tour with me (some of his kids are in his band). We are touring the U.S. and overseas.”

While upbeat, Campbell struggles with interviews and relies on his wife or family members to assist him. He also depends on support on stage, but doesn’t want people to feel sorry for him.

“I have had a great career, I have wanted to be a guitar player for as long as I can remember and I got that the chance to do that my whole career,” he said. “So I have been blessed. Now I just take every day one day at a time the way I should live anyways. I have a strong faith in God, a great wife and children, and a lot of great friends and fans. How could I ask any more out of life?”

TEQUILA DAYS

Blessed he has been. His musical talents caught the ears of people like Elvis, Frank Sinatra, Phil Spector, The Beach Boys and others. He was a member of the band The Champs, who had the 1958 number one hit “Tequilla.”

Campbell went on to join the legendary Los Angles session band The Wrecking Crew, who appeared on several albums, including hits for the Beach Boys, The Byrds, The Mamas and Papas, and Simon and Garfunkel, among others. It was during that period that Campbell was asked to tour with The Beach Boys.

“Brian Wilson got sick and the guys knew me from the session work I did on several of their number one hits, so they asked me to tour with them in 1965,” said Campbell during a 1981 interview. “It was funny -- they had me play bass and sing the high notes. At the time I didn’t appreciate it; looking back on it today, I was fortunate for being a part of The Beach Boys.”

One thing he doesn’t feel fortunate about was opening for The Doors.

“I was just launching a solo career and they booked me to open for The Doors,” said Campbell. “I am not sure what was worse: getting up there on stage having people yell during my songs ‘we want the Doors,’ or flying to the shows with Jim Morrison. That guy was really weird. Fortunately, after a few shows I got off the tour.”

Glen Campbell never looked back after that moment. He ended up hosting a popular TV show, had 81 chart topping hits including “Galveston,” “Gentle On My Mind,” “Wichita Lineman,” and “Rhinestone Cowboy.”

His final album “Ghost on the Canvas,” released earlier this summer, features Chris Issak, Brian Setzer, Keith Urban and Billy Corban among others. The critics are hailing it as Campbell’s greatest work ever.

Glen Campbell will bring his Goodbye Tour to Kewadin Casinos this Thursday October 13. For ticket information, contact the box office at www.kewadincasinos.com or call 1-800-539-2346. Content for this article came from an e-mail response to questions submitted to Glen Campbell’s family and from a 1981 interview Rick Coates conducted with Campbell for another publication.

 
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