Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · AC Paws
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AC Paws

Erin Crowell - October 31st, 2011  
AC Paw foster program saves thousands of area cats and dogs

AC Paw co-founder Brian Manley gets comfy with Sugar, a dog saved by the animal rescue group.

Brian Manley’s voice breaks a bit when he talks about “Winter,” an old golden retriever who was hit by a snowplow in Grand Traverse County one night. A passing driver had witnessed the accident and had Manley, executive director of AC Paw, on the phone, asking what he should do.

“Can you meet me at the vet?” Manley asked the man.

There were three options that night: Let the dog bleed on the side of the road. Take him to a vet where he would be put down because of his age; or save him.

The dog’s leg was amputated and he spent the remaining three years of his life in the loving and caring home of a foster family.

“Those are the kinds of things we live for,” said Manley, referring to AC Paw, a Northern Michigan non-profit that provides medical services and foster programs for stray or unwanted cats and dogs.

AC Paw recently won Pet Friend Magazine’s Annual “PAW” Award, having the fewest cases of euthanasia for dogs and cats in 2010 – thanks to the valiant efforts of Manley, co-founder June McGrath and the countless volunteers who house these pets when there’s nowhere else to go but under the needle.

FOSTERING OF THE FURRY

Lori McFarlan, marketing consultant for Northern Star Broadcasting, has been bringing unwanted dogs into her Fife Lake home for the past three years. She got involved with AC Paw after finding Benson, a pug she adopted as a companion for her elderly basset hound.

“A few months after I adopted Benson, Brian Manley called to see if I’d be interested in fostering some puppies that were going to be euthanized that day,” she recalled.

Since then, McFarlan has fostered 32 dogs of all shapes and sizes – from pugs and shih tzus to Labradors and mixed breeds.

“I have an in-out kennel at my house,” she said. “With large breed dogs it’s fine year-round because it’s warm. For smaller dogs I have an area in the house I section off when I’m away.”

Although AC Paw provides pet food for its foster parents, McFarlan purchases her own – a personal contribution to the cause that spent over $120,000 on pet care last year (which includes food, crates, vaccinations, medical care and spay/neuter services).

About 37% of the organization’s operating budget comes from adoption fees, according to Manley – which costs $150.

“For that, you’re getting a healthy pet,” said McFarlan regarding the fee. “That’s less than what is spent for veterinary care.”

In terms of letting go of a foster pet, McFarlan said the process is hard, but it sure beats the alternative.

“There are times when we’ve come in and the animal is doped up, ready to be euthanized,” said June McGrath. “We actually have one dog in the car right now who was about to be put down.”

Manley said despite the seemingly neverending number of animals who are brought to AC Paw—whether it’s risk of euthanization, abandonment or medical issues—even saving just one more pet’s life is worth it.

“We look at the fact that we’ve rescued so many animals who are now all sterilized—a total of over 6,200 total—plus an extra 800 outside of what we do. You can multiply that knowing there are thousands who didn’t have to die,” he pointed out.

However, the organization is only successful if volunteers continue to open their homes, taking the time to transport the animals to vet appointments and treat them as if they were their own – if only for a short while.

“It’s our job to mend broken hearts, spirits and sometimes broken bodies,” said McFarlan, “then they can move on to a loving home.”

For those interested in volunteering or fostering a pet for AC Paw, contact them at acpawbrian@torchlake.com or acpaw@ torchlake.com. Contributions supporting the continuous care of cats and dogs may be mailed to AC Paw, PO Box 94, Acme, MI 49610.

 
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