Letters

Letters 10-27-2014

Paging Doctor Dan: The doctor’s promise to repeal Obamacare reminds me of the frantic restaurant owner hurrying to install an exhaust fan after the kitchen burns down. He voted 51 times to replace the ACA law; a colossal waste of money and time. It’s here to stay and he has nothing to replace it.

Evolution Is Real Science: Breathtaking inanity. That was the term used by Judge John Jones III in his elegant evisceration of creationist arguments attempting to equate it to evolutionary theory in his landmark Kitzmiller vs. Dover Board of Education decision in 2005.

U.S. No Global Police: Steven Tuttle in the October 13 issue is correct: our military, under the leadership of the President (not the Congress) is charged with protecting the country, its citizens, and its borders. It is not charged with  performing military missions in other places in the world just because they have something we want (oil), or we don’t like their form of government, or we want to force them to live by the UN or our rules.

Graffiti: Art Or Vandalism?: I walk the [Grand Traverse] Commons frequently and sometimes I include the loop up to the cistern just to go and see how the art on the cistern has evolved. Granted there is the occasional gross image or word but generally there is a flurry of color.

NMEAC Snubbed: Northern Michigan Environmental Action Council (NMEAC) is the Grand Traverse region’s oldest grassroots environmental advocacy organization. Preserving the environment through citizen action and education is our mission.

Vote, Everyone: Election Day on November 4 is fast approaching, and now is the time to make a commitment to vote. You may be getting sick of the political ads on TV, but instead, be grateful that you live in a free country with open elections. Take the time to learn about the candidates by contacting your county parties and doing research.

Do Fluoride Research: Hydrofluorosilicic acid, H2SiF6, is a byproduct from the production of fertilizer. This liquid, not environmentally safe, is scrubbed from the chimney of the fertilizer plant, put into containers, and shipped. Now it is a ‘product’ added to the public drinking water.

Meet The Homeless: As someone who volunteers for a Traverse City organization that works with homeless people, I am appalled at what is happening at the meetings regarding the homeless shelter. The people fighting this shelter need to get to know some homeless families. They have the wrong idea about who the homeless are.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Irish Christmas UP NORTH
. . . .

Irish Christmas UP NORTH

Kristi Kates - December 12th, 2011  

Pauline Scanlon and Eilis Kennedy of Lumiere.

You can celebrate Christmas Celtic style this year by traveling across the water to the Emerald Isle – without going near the Atlantic Ocean.

“An Irish Christmas in America” celebrates the heritage of Ireland on Beaver Island Dec. 18. A 15-minute plane ride or two-hour boat trip from Charlevoix, Beaver Island is called “America’s Emerald Isle” in reference to its Irish roots.

And for those who can’t make that trek, the show is also being performed Dec. 17 at St. Francis High School’s Kohler Auditorium in Traverse City.

TRADITIONS OLD AND NEW

According to Oisin Mac Diarmada, who first put together the holiday show in 2005, this year’s version will emphasize Ireland’s vocal tradition.

“The main concept behind the show is to engage the audience in an Irish cultural celebration of the holiday season,” Diarmada continues. “With the consumerist emphasis on a modern Christmas experience, people really seem to enjoy taking some time off during this hectic season to take an entertaining look at some of the customs and celebrations inherent in an Irish Christmas celebration.”

Diarmada, perhaps best known for his work with the traditional Irish music group Téada, was initially inspired by a Christmas show he’d been in that toured Germany and Holland. He wanted to bring a similar experience to American audiences.

“An Irish Christmas shares many similarities and themes with other worldwide celebrations of Christmas,” Diarmada says. “There are also some pretty unique customs such as the Wren Boys tradition, which takes place on December 26th each year, which are interesting and historic.”

The Wren Boys involved the sacrifice of a wren, which supposedly betrayed the Irish against the invading Norse over a millennium ago by pecking on a drum, giving away the Irish hiding place.

“It’s always fascinating to hear about the customs which we share with other cultures and of course the distinctive practices which make our celebration unique,” he says.

This family-friendly performance features Irish ballads and holiday carols, lively fiddle tunes and Irish dancing. Narration brings to life ancient customs and stories, while evocative photographic images provide a unique backdrop.

SPECIAL GUESTS

The show this year will feature Lumiere, lauded as one of Ireland’s leading vocal acts.

“I am really excited about bringing Lumiere to the U.S. This will be a first U.S. tour for this group which features singers Pauline Scanlon and Eilis Kennedy along with guitarist Donogh Hennessy,” Diarmada says.

“Seamus Begley, legendary West Kerry accordionist and singer, will once again join the tour this year, as well. Seamus and myself have just finished recording a new duet album which will be released just in time for the Christmas tour.”

One of Diarmada’s favorite things about bringing “An Irish Christmas in America” to America is the fact that he gets to experience the holidays stateside.

“The atmosphere throughout the U.S. during the Christmas season is absolutely wonderful,” he enthuses. “I really enjoy the warmth of the people and the beautiful decorations in towns and cities all over the country.”

BEAVER ISLAND’S IRISH SOUL

Michigan’s Emerald Isle revels in its Irish roots.

“To say that the island has a very strong Irish heritage would be, perhaps, an understatement,” say Ann Partridge, the effusive and friendly Events Director for the Beaver Island Community Center.

“Many Islanders can easily trace their family directly to the eviction and subsequent emigration of Arranmore Island, off the coast of Donegal, in 1851. In fact, Beaver Island became “twinned” with Arranmore in a ceremony on their soil in March of 2003 – an event that was actually attended by 48 of these Beaver Island descendants.”

Irish music, Partridge says, is part of the Island’s “soul” - part of the residents’ and descendants’ identity, and a unique part of visiting the island itself.

“The Community Center is committed to preserving this unique heritage and culture. Since opening, the Celtic sounds of Switchback, Shae Laurel, Teada, The Screaming Orphans, and many more have filled our hall,” she says.

“For Beaver Island, a Christmas celebration featuring Irish music, song, dance, and tales couldn’t be more fitting.”

Diarmada feels the same way.

“It will be so exciting to finish our long tour on Beaver Island, where I’m sure the weather will be more Christmassy than that which we will encounter in California at the beginning of the tour,” he said.

Tickets for An Irish Christmas in America at Kohler Auditorium Dec. 17 are $20 in advance and $25 at the door. For tickets or more information call 941-8667. Tickets for the Dec. 18 6 p.m. show at the Beaver Island Community Center are $30. For more info, email bicommunitycenter@tds.net, or telephone 231-448-2022.

 
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