Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Reversing the Damage
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Reversing the Damage

Ross Boissoneau - January 9th, 2012  

Heart attack leads to lifestyle change

For some people, moving to a plant-based diet might seem difficult.

Even for those who are vegetarians, dropping all dairy, nuts and oils could be considered a bit much.

But after suffering a heart attack despite what was considered an active lifestyle and a healthy diet, Gary Myles embraced that extreme.

“I was fairly active, two or three times a week in the gym, walking regularly,” said the 66-year-old Myles. “I was fairly careful about my diet. I ate mostly fish, some chicken, rarely red meat.”

Then a year ago, after his regular morning workout, Myles began experiencing stomach pain. A trip to emergency brought the stunning news: he had suffered a heart attack.

Despite the diet and exercise and no family history of cardiac disease, he was told he had two arteries with a 90% blockage and one with 100%.

LIFESTYLE REINVENTION

Seven stents later, Myles was determined to regain his health. That ultimately led to what might be seen by some as a radical lifestyle change: he would eschew any animal-based foods, nuts or seeds, and even olive oil or other supposedly healthy oils.

The decision stemmed from a rather offhand remark made by his cardiologist, after he examined Myles following his heart attack.

“Dr. Varner said, almost as an aside, ‘You know, our bodies are designed to eat a plant-based diet,’” recounted Myles.

That led Myles to books by Dr. Dean Ornish and Dr. Caldwell B. Esselstyn, Jr., both of which recommended vegetarian diets.

“Both touted plant-based diets and moderate exercise,” he said. “Both cited studies. They said, to get fit, get less than ten percent of your calories from fat. They said you can reverse the buildup of cholesterol and placque.”

That was enough for Myles. He figured the best way to regain and maintain his health was to go all in.

And so far, so good. “I just got back from a visit from my cardiologist, and he said I don’t have anything to worry about.”

EATING OUT A CHALLENGE

While Myles doesn’t visit any fast-food places, he can and does still go out to eat. It just takes a little more planning.

“New Year’s Eve we went to Funistrada. We called in advance and I said, ‘I have a challenge for you.’ The chef prepared a stir-fry. It was really good. He came out and talked to me while we were having dinner and said if you like it we may keep it on the menu.”

Myles said most of the locally-owned restaurants are able to accommodate him, it’s just the franchise restaurants where that is difficult.

At home, Myles and his wife Rosemary are able to create a host of meals without any of the forbidden ingredients.

“The artisan breads at most bakeries usually have no fat. You get some raspberryflavored vinegars like at Fustini’s and it’s like dessert.

“It isn’t that hard. I kind of play at it.

I make a hummus with no oil. It’s really good,” he said.

But Myles admits that sometimes he does experience a longing for those days gone by.

“On New Year’s Day, my wife cooked prime rib. It smelled really good to me.

“The food I eat, the rice, beans, stir-fry, has no odor. That (scent of food) adds to the effect.”

In addition to his diet, Myles has upped his exercise regimen. He works out three times a week and walks three or four days a week as well, either on the treadmill or outside if the weather permits.

And so far, the results have been encouraging.

“My heart is strong, the arteries are staying open. Cholesterol levels are good.

“Dr. Varner said, ‘Just keep doing what you are doing.’ He says your body will tell you if something’s wrong.”

 
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