Letters 10-17-2016

Here’s The Truth The group Save our Downtown (SOD), which put Proposal 3 on the ballot, is ignoring the negative consequences that would result if the proposal passes. Despite the group’s name, the proposal impacts the entire city, not just downtown. Munson Medical Center, NMC, and the Grand Traverse Commons are also zoned for buildings over 60’ tall...

Keep TC As-Is In response to Lynda Prior’s letter, no one is asking the people to vote every time someone wants to build a building; Prop. 3 asks that people vote if a building is to be built over 60 feet. Traverse City will not die but will grow at a pace that keeps it the city people want to visit and/or reside; a place to raise a family. It seems people in high-density cities with tall buildings are the ones who flock to TC...

A Right To Vote I cannot understand how people living in a democracy would willingly give up the right to vote on an impactful and important issue. But that is exactly what the people who oppose Proposal 3 are advocating. They call the right to vote a “burden.” Really? Since when does voting on an important issue become a “burden?” The heart of any democracy is the right of the people to have their voice heard...

Reasons For NoI have great respect for the Prop. 3 proponents and consider them friends but in this case they’re wrong. A “yes” vote on Prop. 3 is really a “no” vote on..

Republican Observations When the Republican party sends its presidential candidates, they’re not sending their best. They’re sending people with a lot of problems. They’re sending criminals, they’re sending deviate rapists. They’re sending drug addicts. They’re sending mentally ill. And some, I assume, are good people...

Stormy Vote Florida Governor Scott warns people on his coast to evacuate because “this storm will kill you! But in response to Hillary Clinton’s suggestion that Florida’s voter registration deadline be extended because a massive evacuation could compromise voter registration and turnout, Republican Governor Scott’s response was that this storm does not necessitate any such extension...

Third Party Benefits It has been proven over and over again that electing Democrat or Republican presidents and representatives only guarantees that dysfunction, corruption and greed will prevail throughout our government. It also I believe that a fair and democratic electoral process, a simple and fair tax structure, quality health care, good education, good paying jobs, adequate affordable housing, an abundance of healthy affordable food, a solid, well maintained infrastructure, a secure social, civil and public service system, an ecologically sustainable outlook for the future and much more is obtainable for all of us...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Skiing With Elk
. . . .

Skiing With Elk

Mike Terrell - January 16th, 2012  
in the Gaylord area

By Mike Terrell

If you like cross country skiing laced with nice amenities, an appealing village dressed for winter, and a touch of nearby wilderness boasting the largest elk herd east of the Mississippi, check out the Gaylord area.

Located just a snowball throw off I-75, Gaylord is arguably one of the best cross country towns in the Lower Peninsula. The village has a charming alpine motif that would fit right into the Swiss Alps, and there’s close to 60 miles of trails, both tracked and untracked, to choose from.

Downtown Gaylord resembles an alpine village. Mansard roofs, textured stucco and shake shingles mix with balconies, painted flower boxes, and A-frames to bring a bit of Switzerland to Northern Michigan. The supermarket even boasts a glockenspiel.


Near town there are a couple of groomed state land trails that offer fairly easy skiing: Pine Baron Pathway and Aspen Park, only four blocks from downtown.

It’s impossible not to see elk at Aspen Park, which is adjacent to the city elk pen. It contains a herd of more than 30 of these magnificent large animals, crowned with an unbelievably large rack of antlers. You’re almost guaranteed an up-close and personal look. The park contains about two miles of single-tracked trails, and it’s lit for night skiing. Trails glide gently through a hemlock forest.

Pine Baron Pathway offers a little over six miles of fairly easy gliding through mixed pine and hardwood forest. It’s located about five miles west of the city off Old Alba Road on Lone Pine Road.

There are three loops, each about two miles in length, that you can mix and match.

The outside distance around the loops is 6.2 miles, which passes an old abandoned homestead that dates back to the 1930s. The trails are groomed for double-track skiing.


The other two state land pathways where you have a decent chance of seeing elk are Shingle Mill Pathway, located about 20 minutes north of Gaylord, and Buttles Road Pathway, about 30-some miles east of town off M-72.

The Pigeon River Country State Forest is a rugged land of contrasts in both terrain and weather. Both the highest and lowest temperature recorded in the Wolverine State has occurred here; from a bone chilling -51 to a sultry high of 112. The average mean temperature is a chilly 42. Winter is arguably the Pigeon’s longest season.

For a good dose of solitude there’s Shingle Mill Pathway, which is located about 11 miles east of Vanderbilt off I-75, a little over 20 miles from downtown Gaylord. This is a place Jeremiah Johnson would’ve been proud to roam. The pathway is surrounded by the 98,000-acre Pigeon River Country State Forest, home to elk, deer, wolves and several other critters.

It offers 11 miles of trails that is broken into loops of six, 10 and 11 miles. (There’s also a ¾ mile trail, but I can’t picture anybody driving to the Pigeon for this short loop.) It’s all untracked, but you often find skied-in tracks, unless you’re there after a fresh snowfall.

The trail meanders along the swiftflowing Pigeon River and then climbs into the highlands overlooking the river valley. Along the way you pass small, frozen lakes, some with beaver lodges. The trail finishes along a boardwalk that passes through a cedar swamp.

I’ve seen elk while cross country skiing here. Not as close as Aspen Park, but it’s a thrill to see these magnificent animals in the wild. Trails start in the back of the state forest campground you come to right after crossing the Pigeon River heading east from Vanderbilt. There’s only one road heading east out of the tiny village. You can’t miss it.


Buttles Road Pathway is located about a half-hour east of Gaylord off of M-72 on Buttles Road. The state-land trail has been groomed off-and-on by local residents with a single-track lane.

The pathway offers three loops totaling a little over six miles. The most challenging terrain is the last loop, which skirts a couple of small scenic lakes on the back portion. The terrain is rolling with small, forested hills. It’s out in the middle of nowhere, and that’s what makes it so appealing. Locals say the elk hang around the area in the winter; the hoof prints I’ve seen would attest to that.

If you decide to spend the night to sample the various trails, there’s an abundance of lodging choices, from resorts to chain motels and quaint “mom and pop” motels, along with a wide variety of restaurants. There’s something to fit just about every budget and ski appetite.

For more information on the Gaylord area, log onto gaylordmichigan.net.

  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5