Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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Real Life

Al Parker - February 6th, 2012  

Artist draws inspiration directly from her settings

Growing up in Gary, Indiana, Angela Saxon knew early on that she wanted to be an artist.

“Oh yeah, I was an art kid,” she says. “Art was always in our lives. My parents had a life membership in the Chicago Art Institute and both were very creative. We always had sketchbooks. It was just a part of my life.”

And she started her fledgling art career in an interesting medium.

“I did paintings with toothpaste as a kid,” she recalls with a laugh. “And I was also an entrepreneur. I took Elmer’s glue and put color in it and sold colored glue.”

Since those early Colgate-on-cardboard days, she’s become an award-winning landscape artist whose oil works hang in collections and galleries across the country. At the Northwest Michigan Regional Artists show currently at the Dennos Museum, Saxon’s The Sky Above the Lake was a $250 award-winner. The show runs through April 1.

Almost all of Saxon’s works are done plein air, or painting on location, and many capture the beauty of Leelanau County, where she makes her home and studio.

“I begin all my paintings direct from the landscape, focusing on expressive movements in nature,” she explains. “I continue to develop the paintings in my studio until the work has reached a very finished level. At this point, I return to what drew me to the scene in the first place, searching for aspects of the painting that are most compelling to me.”

LANDSCAPES BECKON

But why plein air? “I mostly work plein air,” she says. “It’s often windy, cold, the flies are biting. It’s just where it all starts for me. I can’t work from photos. I can’t explain it, but it’s just so darn exciting.”

When looking at a landscape, Saxon is drawn to specific places within a scene, such as intimate details of light glimmering through a stand of trees, or the bands of color that embrace a shoreline.

“Angela is celebrated as one of Northern Michigan’s best landscape artists,” says Sue Ann Round, owner of the Michigan Artists Gallery in Suttons Bay where several of Saxon’s works are always on display. “Her brush strokes are unmistakable, as she beautifully executes the broad expanses of our beloved land and waterscapes.”

Saxon’s works can also be seen at Gallery 50 in Traverse City, as well as galleries in Douglas, MI., Cleveland, OH, and Atlanta, GA.

In addition to her paintings, Saxon works as a graphic designer, doing logos and website and other graphic services, including providing Michigan Artists Gallery in Suttons Bay with its unique look and personality.

After graduating from high school, Saxon went to Indiana University where she earned her BFA in painting. At IU she met and married Erik Saxon. Eventually they moved to Chicago, settling in the artsy community of Pilsen. In 1987, Erik suggested moving to Northern Michigan.

“It was a bit of a culture shock for me,” says Saxon. “But one of the things I really came to like was the community of artists here. Art is so lonely when you’re just working in the studio or out in a field by yourself. You have to stay connected. I’m involved in a dinner group with other artists and we meet monthly to share a potluck meal and bring works to share. It’s very sustaining.”

NEW MEDIUM

In recent years, Saxon has also been working in encaustic – a mixture of beeswax, damar and pigment. This process requires timing and dexterity.

“The encaustic paint is kept in a liquid state on a heated palette,” she explains. “The artist must work quickly with the warm, melted paint as it dries quite quickly when on the brush and away from the heat. In many aspects it is very similar to my process of working with oils, as it is also built up in layers.”

Each successive layer of the encaustic must be gently heated so it can fuse with the previous layer of wax. Some of the layers are transparent, revealing previous layers. Sometime a layer will melt right into a previous layer.

“There is certainly an element of chance in this process,” she says. “This keeps the work fresh and exciting for me and hopefully for the viewer as well.”

Saxon has taken a couple of months off painting, but she’s eager to get back to the palette. “I want to paint buildings in downtown Traverse City and Suttons Bay,” she says. “I’ve been off a while and want to get painting again.”

Another project on her horizon is an exhibition involving one of the region’s most art-inspiring locations. “The Art of Sleeping Bear Dunes” is planned for 2013 at the Dennos Museum, according to Saxon. It will include an accompanying coffee table book of the works in the exhibit. Saxon and others are working to make this happen.

For information about Saxon and her work, visit angelasaxon.com.

 
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