Letters

Letters 02-08-2016

Less Ageism, Please The January 4 issue of this publication proved to me that there are some sensible voices of reason in our community regarding all things “inter-generational.” I offer a word of thanks to Elizabeth Myers. I too have worked hard for what I’ve earned throughout my years in the various positions I’ve held. While I too cannot speak for each millennial, brash generalizations about a lack of work ethic don’t sit well with me...Joe Connolly, Traverse City

Now That’s an Escalation I just read the letter from Greg and his defense of the AR15. The letter started with great information but then out of nowhere his opinion went off the rails. “The government wants total gun control and then confiscation; then the elimination of all Constitutional rights.” Wait... what?! To quote the great Ron Burgundy, “Well, that escalated quickly!”

Healthy Eating and Exercise for Children Healthy foods and exercise are important for children of all ages. It is important for children because it empowers them to do their best at school and be able to do their homework and study...

Mascots and Harsh Native American Truths The letter from the Choctaw lady deserves an answer. I have had a gutful of the whining about the fate of the American Indian. The American Indians were the losers in an imperial expansion; as such, they have, overall, fared much better than a lot of such losers throughout history. Everything the lady complains about in the way of what was done by the nasty, evil Whites was being done by Indians to other Indians long before Europeans arrived...

Snyder Must Go I believe it’s time. It’s time for Governor Snyder to go. The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the EPA Criminal Investigation Division are now investigating the Flint water crisis that poisoned thousands of people. Governor Snyder signed the legislation that established the Emergency Manager law. Since its inception it has proven to be a dismal failure...

Erosion of Public Trust Let’s look at how we’ve been experiencing global warming. Between 1979 and 2013, increases in temperature and wind speeds along with more rain-free days have combined to stretch fire seasons worldwide by 20 percent. In the U.S., the fire seasons are 78 days longer than in the 1970s...

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Real Life

Al Parker - February 6th, 2012  

Artist draws inspiration directly from her settings

Growing up in Gary, Indiana, Angela Saxon knew early on that she wanted to be an artist.

“Oh yeah, I was an art kid,” she says. “Art was always in our lives. My parents had a life membership in the Chicago Art Institute and both were very creative. We always had sketchbooks. It was just a part of my life.”

And she started her fledgling art career in an interesting medium.

“I did paintings with toothpaste as a kid,” she recalls with a laugh. “And I was also an entrepreneur. I took Elmer’s glue and put color in it and sold colored glue.”

Since those early Colgate-on-cardboard days, she’s become an award-winning landscape artist whose oil works hang in collections and galleries across the country. At the Northwest Michigan Regional Artists show currently at the Dennos Museum, Saxon’s The Sky Above the Lake was a $250 award-winner. The show runs through April 1.

Almost all of Saxon’s works are done plein air, or painting on location, and many capture the beauty of Leelanau County, where she makes her home and studio.

“I begin all my paintings direct from the landscape, focusing on expressive movements in nature,” she explains. “I continue to develop the paintings in my studio until the work has reached a very finished level. At this point, I return to what drew me to the scene in the first place, searching for aspects of the painting that are most compelling to me.”

LANDSCAPES BECKON

But why plein air? “I mostly work plein air,” she says. “It’s often windy, cold, the flies are biting. It’s just where it all starts for me. I can’t work from photos. I can’t explain it, but it’s just so darn exciting.”

When looking at a landscape, Saxon is drawn to specific places within a scene, such as intimate details of light glimmering through a stand of trees, or the bands of color that embrace a shoreline.

“Angela is celebrated as one of Northern Michigan’s best landscape artists,” says Sue Ann Round, owner of the Michigan Artists Gallery in Suttons Bay where several of Saxon’s works are always on display. “Her brush strokes are unmistakable, as she beautifully executes the broad expanses of our beloved land and waterscapes.”

Saxon’s works can also be seen at Gallery 50 in Traverse City, as well as galleries in Douglas, MI., Cleveland, OH, and Atlanta, GA.

In addition to her paintings, Saxon works as a graphic designer, doing logos and website and other graphic services, including providing Michigan Artists Gallery in Suttons Bay with its unique look and personality.

After graduating from high school, Saxon went to Indiana University where she earned her BFA in painting. At IU she met and married Erik Saxon. Eventually they moved to Chicago, settling in the artsy community of Pilsen. In 1987, Erik suggested moving to Northern Michigan.

“It was a bit of a culture shock for me,” says Saxon. “But one of the things I really came to like was the community of artists here. Art is so lonely when you’re just working in the studio or out in a field by yourself. You have to stay connected. I’m involved in a dinner group with other artists and we meet monthly to share a potluck meal and bring works to share. It’s very sustaining.”

NEW MEDIUM

In recent years, Saxon has also been working in encaustic – a mixture of beeswax, damar and pigment. This process requires timing and dexterity.

“The encaustic paint is kept in a liquid state on a heated palette,” she explains. “The artist must work quickly with the warm, melted paint as it dries quite quickly when on the brush and away from the heat. In many aspects it is very similar to my process of working with oils, as it is also built up in layers.”

Each successive layer of the encaustic must be gently heated so it can fuse with the previous layer of wax. Some of the layers are transparent, revealing previous layers. Sometime a layer will melt right into a previous layer.

“There is certainly an element of chance in this process,” she says. “This keeps the work fresh and exciting for me and hopefully for the viewer as well.”

Saxon has taken a couple of months off painting, but she’s eager to get back to the palette. “I want to paint buildings in downtown Traverse City and Suttons Bay,” she says. “I’ve been off a while and want to get painting again.”

Another project on her horizon is an exhibition involving one of the region’s most art-inspiring locations. “The Art of Sleeping Bear Dunes” is planned for 2013 at the Dennos Museum, according to Saxon. It will include an accompanying coffee table book of the works in the exhibit. Saxon and others are working to make this happen.

For information about Saxon and her work, visit angelasaxon.com.

 
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