Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Sturgeon River Winter Float
. . . .

Sturgeon River Winter Float

Mike Terrell - February 13th, 2012  
Cold, scenic and fun

Those who enjoy the beauty of our Michigan waters in the summertime – and who doesn’t? – might want to consider doing so in the winter as well.

The charm and quietude of our region is readily evident on a rafting trip on the Sturgeon River in what is generally considered the off-season for such expeditions.

For our group, the sheer beauty of the trip quickly quelled conversation. After much chatting, laughter and lots of awed exclamations at the start of our float, we became quieter, understanding the beauty of a winter float trip.

Our group was made up of Michigan Outdoor Writers Association members and a couple from Holland on an anniversary weekend who had decided this might be more fun than trying to cross country ski given the lack of snow.

We divided into two rafts, each with a guide.

Each raft can take up to six passengers plus the guide. Big Bear Adventures in Indian River was conducting the float trip, which they’ve been doing for the past nine years, according to our guide, Jamie Porter.

The silence was deep and golden as we glided along at times under branches of overhanging cedar along the river. Snow covered the banks and helped illuminate the darkly wooded shoreline. The only sound was the gurgle of rushing water as it swept along the gravelly riverbed and around fallen trees and submerged logs.

The waters of the Sturgeon, one of the few northern flowing rivers in Northern Michigan, was clean and cold.

CHALLENGING FUN

We put into the river upstream for an hour-and-a-half float back down towards Indian River and Burt Lake. The actual river trip is about four miles.

Along the way Porter gave us a little history on the Sturgeon. With an average descent of 14 feet per mile, it is one of the fastest flowing rivers in the Lower Peninsula.

According to Jerry Dennis in Canoeing Michigan Rivers, “The consistently quick current combined with tight turns, leaning trees, and occasional obstructions makes it a challenge for paddlers.”

Not to worry. The large rubber raft bounces and works its way through the sweepers, tight bends and fallen trees and logs with incredible ease. Occasionally Porter would have us paddle a few quick strokes to make it around a tight bend or avoid outstretched limbs waiting to knock off an unwary paddler.

Mostly he guided the raft using his paddle like a rudder leaving us to enjoy the passing scenery. We had to duck a few times, but nobody came close to being knocked out of the raft.

“I’m not sure how many winter trips I’ve made down the river over the last nine years,” laughed Porter, when I asked him how long it took to hone his navigating skills. “We don’t have a set schedule. We just take groups as they call to make the float trip.

“I never get tired of the trip. Winter is one of my favorite times on the river. The beauty and peace and quiet this time of year are extra special. You see a lot more wildlife, because you can see further into the woods and snow highlights,” he added.

Deer are frequent visitors to the riverbank during a typical winter and other animals as well because of the open water, according to the guide. Eagles would normally be seen perched high in trees along the river drawn by prey frequenting the river.

However, this isn’t a typical winter, and we saw only a mallard and a hen. It still didn’t detract from the beauty of the winter float.

DRESS FOR SUCCESS

While my upper body didn’t get cold, dressed in a long underwear layer, fleece and my cross country ski jacket, my feet did get cold. I had on winter socks and my insulated cross country boots, but I would suggest a pair of Sorrels or similar boots instead.

The trip ended much too quickly for most of us; myself included, despite my cold feet. You get immersed into watching the scenery float by and the beauty of the season. You kind of forget about time and aren’t ready for it to end.

“We see a lot of repeat business,” said Porter. “People will come back and bring friends that haven’t done anything like it before. The number of winter trips seems to keep increasing each winter.”

The cost is $34 per person for six people, $35 for five, $36 for four, $38 for three, and $42 for two. That includes your life vest and a paddle.

The trip is available seven days a week.

Big Bear Adventure is located across from the entrance to Burt Lake State Park on Straits Highway. You can reach them for more information or to schedule a trip by calling 231-238-8181 or by logging onto www.bigbearadventures.com.

 
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