Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Horses for Heroes
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Horses for Heroes

Erin Crowell - May 21st, 2012  

While serving in Iraq as a recon cavalry scout in the U.S. Army, Jason Young survived three explosions.

But the ordeal left him with a traumatic brain injury and post-concussive syndrome, known as “shell shock.” Along with arthritis in his back and structural damage to his neck, Young was medically discharged.

For a man who wanted to make a military career for himself, the transition wasn’t easy.

“I had a real tough time transitioning back and a hard time losing the military,” said the now 34-year-old. “Having been taken away so prematurely, I had to deal with depression. When I went back to school, I was on the Dean’s List, but I wasn’t able to maintain a normal life without selfmedicating through alcohol.”

That was until Young discovered Horses for Heroes, a nation-wide program helping U.S. veterans cope with physical, emotional and psychological issues, including Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSD) which can lead to isolation and depression.

Now Young and fellow veterans are busy at work building a program in Traverse City.

CHARITY HILL

The Horses for Heroes program is based on the concept of soldiers helping soldiers with the aid of horses and riding – a combination of physical and mental stimulation, surrounded by the camaraderie of fellow vets.

Charity Hill Ranch, a non-profit rehabilitation ranch based in Rapid City, recently purchased an 11-acre farm off Silver Pines Drive in Traverse City, known as Windemere Farms. It is located just out of reach of the sights, noises and distractions of town.

“When they’re having a bad day, when they are riled up and triggered, they can come over the hill and the city disappears and it’s peaceful,” Young says about his soldier comrades.

Wearing a ball cap and plaid button-up that reveals his tattooed forearms, Young stands in the meadow with his cell phone to his ear. Someone has offered to donate their horse to the program. It will join “Bob” and “Red,” two therapy horses already working at the farm, with another on its way.

In the barn, there is room for at least a dozen more, as stalls are being cleaned and repainted for their new tenants. On the west side of the building is an indoor riding arena.

Founded by Christine O’Connell, Charity Hill Ranch started as an equine therapy program for civilians with brain and spinal injuries. The ranch is certified through Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International, which utilizes Hippo-therapy (or the use of a horse as a treatment tool by professional therapists to address impairments, functional limitations and disabilities in patients with neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction).

Such therapy has been shown to improve balance, mobility, dynamic postural control, along with sensory processing and cognitive and communication outcomes.

Since Charity Hill opened its Rapid City location in 2010, the program has included the Horses for Heroes program, providing soldiers with peace, confidence and physical benefits.

That mission will continue at the new Traverse City location.

Horse riding has allowed Young to improve both psychologically and physically, which got him back to something he loves: physical labor.

“The therapy loosens up my back,” he said. “When riding, you have to match the stride of the horse with your hips. The horse forces you to do this because if you’re not doing it correctly, you feel it. When you are doing it correctly, it feels like you’re floating, like you’re one with the horse.”

The therapy has allowed Young to do manual labor on the ranch, something close to what he was doing before serving in the Army.

“I was in construction, so it works out great,” he smiles.

MORE THAN HORSE RIDING

The veterans at Charity Hill envision more than just a horseback riding facility. They see a community offering an outlet to those returning from the trauma of war.

“We’ve been talking about doing a little hangout spot, a plains teepee where you can come hang out and enjoy some morning cowboy coffee,” says Jonathon Reed, a discharged Sergeant in the U.S. Army who now serves as the veteran volunteer coordinator. “It’s projected to be like a working dude ranch.”

Young and Reed have been digging a community garden behind the property’s original barn. To the left of the plot will be a landscaped waterfall. Eventually, they hope for a bunk house.

“It’s just another opportunity for vets to come and work in peace, at their own pace,” said Reed.

The hope is that enough veterans will go through the Horses for Soldiers program where they will eventually have the opportunity to mentor other veterans.

For its most recent program, Horses for Heroes saw anywhere from four to seven veterans during the two-hour course, although they anticipate more.

“When I left the Army in 2007, there weren’t many Iraq or Afghanistan vets in the area,” says Reed, “but we know that population will continue to grow.”

JOIN THE CREW

The Horses for Heroes program is free to veterans through generous gifts and donations from the community. Aside from financial support (a two-hour session costs $83), Charity Hill is seeking help in many aspects of getting the program going full-speed.

“We’re looking for people with different expertise,” said O’Connell, while taking a break from installing fence posts. “We’re looking for masons or people with experiencing putting up fencing or who even have available fencing. We could also use people to help cook during the classes since we serve food.”

If you or someone you know is a veteran and would like to learn more about the Horses for Heroes program, visit charityhillranch.org or call Ron Smith at 231-631-2353. Volunteers may also inquire about opportunities by calling Christine O’Connell at 231-258-5437.

 
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