Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Features · Horses for Heroes
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Horses for Heroes

Erin Crowell - May 21st, 2012  

While serving in Iraq as a recon cavalry scout in the U.S. Army, Jason Young survived three explosions.

But the ordeal left him with a traumatic brain injury and post-concussive syndrome, known as “shell shock.” Along with arthritis in his back and structural damage to his neck, Young was medically discharged.

For a man who wanted to make a military career for himself, the transition wasn’t easy.

“I had a real tough time transitioning back and a hard time losing the military,” said the now 34-year-old. “Having been taken away so prematurely, I had to deal with depression. When I went back to school, I was on the Dean’s List, but I wasn’t able to maintain a normal life without selfmedicating through alcohol.”

That was until Young discovered Horses for Heroes, a nation-wide program helping U.S. veterans cope with physical, emotional and psychological issues, including Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSD) which can lead to isolation and depression.

Now Young and fellow veterans are busy at work building a program in Traverse City.


The Horses for Heroes program is based on the concept of soldiers helping soldiers with the aid of horses and riding – a combination of physical and mental stimulation, surrounded by the camaraderie of fellow vets.

Charity Hill Ranch, a non-profit rehabilitation ranch based in Rapid City, recently purchased an 11-acre farm off Silver Pines Drive in Traverse City, known as Windemere Farms. It is located just out of reach of the sights, noises and distractions of town.

“When they’re having a bad day, when they are riled up and triggered, they can come over the hill and the city disappears and it’s peaceful,” Young says about his soldier comrades.

Wearing a ball cap and plaid button-up that reveals his tattooed forearms, Young stands in the meadow with his cell phone to his ear. Someone has offered to donate their horse to the program. It will join “Bob” and “Red,” two therapy horses already working at the farm, with another on its way.

In the barn, there is room for at least a dozen more, as stalls are being cleaned and repainted for their new tenants. On the west side of the building is an indoor riding arena.

Founded by Christine O’Connell, Charity Hill Ranch started as an equine therapy program for civilians with brain and spinal injuries. The ranch is certified through Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International, which utilizes Hippo-therapy (or the use of a horse as a treatment tool by professional therapists to address impairments, functional limitations and disabilities in patients with neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction).

Such therapy has been shown to improve balance, mobility, dynamic postural control, along with sensory processing and cognitive and communication outcomes.

Since Charity Hill opened its Rapid City location in 2010, the program has included the Horses for Heroes program, providing soldiers with peace, confidence and physical benefits.

That mission will continue at the new Traverse City location.

Horse riding has allowed Young to improve both psychologically and physically, which got him back to something he loves: physical labor.

“The therapy loosens up my back,” he said. “When riding, you have to match the stride of the horse with your hips. The horse forces you to do this because if you’re not doing it correctly, you feel it. When you are doing it correctly, it feels like you’re floating, like you’re one with the horse.”

The therapy has allowed Young to do manual labor on the ranch, something close to what he was doing before serving in the Army.

“I was in construction, so it works out great,” he smiles.


The veterans at Charity Hill envision more than just a horseback riding facility. They see a community offering an outlet to those returning from the trauma of war.

“We’ve been talking about doing a little hangout spot, a plains teepee where you can come hang out and enjoy some morning cowboy coffee,” says Jonathon Reed, a discharged Sergeant in the U.S. Army who now serves as the veteran volunteer coordinator. “It’s projected to be like a working dude ranch.”

Young and Reed have been digging a community garden behind the property’s original barn. To the left of the plot will be a landscaped waterfall. Eventually, they hope for a bunk house.

“It’s just another opportunity for vets to come and work in peace, at their own pace,” said Reed.

The hope is that enough veterans will go through the Horses for Soldiers program where they will eventually have the opportunity to mentor other veterans.

For its most recent program, Horses for Heroes saw anywhere from four to seven veterans during the two-hour course, although they anticipate more.

“When I left the Army in 2007, there weren’t many Iraq or Afghanistan vets in the area,” says Reed, “but we know that population will continue to grow.”


The Horses for Heroes program is free to veterans through generous gifts and donations from the community. Aside from financial support (a two-hour session costs $83), Charity Hill is seeking help in many aspects of getting the program going full-speed.

“We’re looking for people with different expertise,” said O’Connell, while taking a break from installing fence posts. “We’re looking for masons or people with experiencing putting up fencing or who even have available fencing. We could also use people to help cook during the classes since we serve food.”

If you or someone you know is a veteran and would like to learn more about the Horses for Heroes program, visit charityhillranch.org or call Ron Smith at 231-631-2353. Volunteers may also inquire about opportunities by calling Christine O’Connell at 231-258-5437.

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