Letters

Letters 10-20-2014

Doctor Dan? After several email conversations with Rep. Benishek, he has confirmed that he doesn’t have a clue of what he does. Here’s why...

In Favor Of Our Parks [Traverse] City Proposal 1 is a creative way to improve our city parks without using our tax dollars. By using a small portion of our oil and gas royalties from the Brown Bridge Trust Fund, our parks can be improved for our children and grandchildren.

From January 1970 Popular Mechanics: “Drastic climate changes will occur within the next 50 years if the use of fossil fuels keeps rising at current rates.” That warning comes from Eugene K. Peterson of the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management.

Newcomers Might Leave: Recently we had guests from India who came over as students with the plan to stay in America. He has a master’s degree in engineering and she is doing her residency in Chicago and plans to specialize in oncology. They talked very candidly about American politics and said that after observing...

Someone Is You: On Sept 21, I joined the 400,000 who took to the streets of New York in the People’s Climate March, followed by a UN Climate Summit and many speeches. On October 13, the Pentagon issued a report calling climate change a significant threat to national security requiring immediate action. How do we move from marches, speeches and reports to meaningful work on this problem? In NYC I read a sign with a simple answer...

Necessary To Pay: Last fall, Grand Traverse voters authorized a new tax to fix roads. It is good, it is necessary.

The Real Reasons for Wolf Hunt: I have really been surprised that no one has been commenting on the true reason for the wolf hunt. All this effort has not been expended so 23 wolves can be killed each year. Instead this manufactured controversy about the wolf hunt has been very carefully crafted to get Proposal 14-2 passed.

Home · Articles · News · Features · Zip!!!
. . . .

Zip!!!

Mike Terrell - June 11th, 2012  
Wildwood Rush lives up to its name

Perched on the edge of a platform 40-some feet in the air wrapped around a sturdy pine tree, my 69-year-old knees were quivering as much as nearby aspen trees.

I was just starting my zip line canopy tour in the high hills above Boyne City and Young State Park at Wildwood Rush. I missed the first couple of lower to the ground zip lines, which the three other people doing the tour said were a little easier. You didn’t have to step off a platform. A running start on the ground got you going.

As I stood there holding tightly to my harness, hands sweating, one of our guides, Andrea Westrick, said, “Just sit down and go.”

She was right. When you sat down into the harness you are wearing instead of jumping off the platform, it was much easier. There was no momentary drop or sinking feeling. You just took off down the line feeling secure and elated. It was a thrill and indeed a rush, but a good one.

A BLAST

Once over the initial uncertainty of flying through the treetops and walking across narrow rope ladders in high the trees, it was a blast.

My companions, a couple from Indiana and a local Boyne City resident, had never done a zip line tour before and were elated with the experience. Not unlike me, heights made the wife Laura a little nervous.

“It was a gut check on that first platform, but once you lift off, the thrill takes over any trepidation. I’m really enjoying this,” she enthused. We had reached the fourth zip line on our tour.

At the fifth station she saw a couple of deer below in the valley while crossing on the zip line, which the guides said is fairly frequent with quiet, smaller groups.

“No ‘wee, wee, weeing,’ like the little pig in the Geico commercials,” laughed guide Wesley Ricker.

There are nine stations in all on a full tour, which takes about two-and-a-half to three hours to complete. I have done a couple of other zip line tours in the Midwest, and there is nothing else like this around the Great Lakes. More in line with western zip line tours, it’s a canopy tour as well. You are high in the trees, but never off of a safety line securing you to cables. It’s a very safe experience.

MILE-AND-A-HALF TOUR

There are five “sky” bridges connecting the nine zip lines, spanning more than a mile-and-a-half tour over the ridges and through the trees. Jaw-dropping views of Lake Charlevoix can be seen from five of the tree platforms. It’s also an eco-friendly tour as the guides clue you in to the trees and foliage around you. All cables are secured to trees in a non-lethal way so as not to damage them.

There is over 5,000 feet of zip lines, the longest being 1,200 feet, which is the last line. You reach speeds up to 40 mph racing down the wire from a high ridge to a twostory platform at the bottom of the hill. A reliable braking system slows you down as you reach the platform, and a guide is there to help steady you as you land.

Reservations are required for the canopy tours, which are available seven days a week through October. With all the hardwood trees in the area, fall would be a surreal experience flying through the colorful foliage.

No reservations are required for single rides on the 1,200 foot Triple Zip Line, which is also the one that ends the canopy tour. It’s open daily on Friday, Saturday and Sunday from noon to 6 p.m. The full canopy tour is $75 per person, and the Triple Zip is $20 for one ride and $35 for three.

For more information and reservations you can log onto www.wildwoodrush.com.

I can’t wait to go again.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close