Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

Home · Articles · News · Features · Death in the Forest
. . . .

Death in the Forest

Robert Downes - June 18th, 2012  

Killing 80 pig sows and their piglets in cold blood this spring to comply with a controversial order from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources was the toughest thing Dave Tuxbury has ever had to do.

“I was flabbergasted that the DNR can just declare something like this and make me kill my own hogs,” says Tuxbury, who owns the 1,600-acre Deer Tracks Ranch in the forests and wetlands along the Manistee River south of Kalkaska. “I was told that if I didn’t kill them by the April 1 deadline I’d be fined $20,000 per animal and be charged with a felony.”

Tuxbury raised what is known as a Duroc hog that was crossbred with a long-haired pig to survive the cold weather climate of Northern Michigan. Although he operates a game ranch which provides hunters with an opportunity to bag trophy-quality deer, elk, bison and formerly hogs, he also considers himself a farmer who has been preserving his land from development thanks to a lucrative business raising hogs for hunting purposes.

But that plan came crashing down this spring with a DNR invasive species order mandating the destruction of feral hogs throughout the state (see related article).

THE KILLING

Tuxbury said he had approximately 200 living hogs and an equal number of unborn pigs on his property when he got word from the DNR that the pigs had to go. The pigs roamed a 200-acre enclosure surrounded by a 10-foot fence with an additional two

feet of chain-link fence trenched into the ground in a forest habitat that Tuxbury considered escape-proof. Additionally, a 10-foot fence runs for 9 miles around the entire property, which represents an overall investment of $7 million.

When the kill order was handed down, Deer Tracks offered hunters across the state a bargain rate to cull more than half the hogs on the property. But that left Tuxbury and his staff to finish the job.

“Almost all of the pigs were mothers – this was my breeding stock,” he says of the animals he put down with a shotgun. “They were all pregnant sows or sows with young piglets that I had to shoot before the deadline.

“When you walk up to a mother with piglets, the mother naturally wants to protect her young,” he adds. “So we had to shoot the mothers first, and then all of the piglets that were running around. It was sickening.”

Gary Giles, a guide at the ranch, said it was a heartbreaking day.

“It was probably one of the toughest things I’ve ever had to do,” Giles says. “To have to shoot an eight or ten-pound little piglet knowing that no one’s ever going to eat it was tough. We’re all hunters here and we always eat what we kill unless it’s something like a coyote.”

As for the hogs which were shot, Tuxbury had them butchered and frozen to serve as meat for his ranch.

FINANCIAL FIX

Tuxbury says he couldn’t sell his hogs to out-of-state ranches because there’s no market for them. But they were valuable as a game animal because “dirt-raised” hogs fed on grasses in a wooded environment are more flavorful than the white pork sold in grocery stores, which comes from domestic pigs raised in concrete pens. He says he’s lost approximately $240,000 per year in revenues, based on the fee of $600 each to hunt the hogs on his property.

“You would think that the state wouldn’t be able to take your farm animals away from you without reimbursing you, but the DNR says it’s not going to reimburse anyone,” he says.

In light of his losses, Tuxbury plans to sue the state for damages, but notes that many other small farmers are unlikely to sue because of the legal expenses.

In the meantime, the future is in doubt for his game ranch and Tuxbury fears he may have to develop the property, which includes virgin wetlands and forest habitat.

“The hogs were basically paying the expenses of the ranch and keeping the property from being developed,” Tuxbury says. “You can’t afford this large of a property anymore without making any income from it. If you can’t farm it, what can you do

 
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