Letters 10-24-2016

It’s Obama’s 1984 Several editions ago I concluded a short letter to the editor with an ominous rhetorical flourish: “Welcome to George Orwell’s 1984 and the grand opening of the Federal Department of Truth!” At the time I am sure most of the readers laughed off my comments as right-wing hyperbole. Shame on you for doubting me...

Gun Bans Don’t Work It is said that mass violence only happens in the USA. A lone gunman in a rubber boat, drifted ashore at a popular resort in Tunisia and randomly shot and killed 38 mostly British and Irish tourists. Tunisian gun laws, which are among the most restrictive in the world, didn’t stop this mass slaughter. And in January 2015, two armed men killed 11 and wounded 11 others in an attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo. French gun laws didn’t stop these assassins...

Scripps’ Good Deed No good deed shall go unpunished! When Dan Scripps was the 101st District State Representative, he introduced legislation to prevent corporations from contaminating (e.g. fracking) or depleting (e.g. Nestle) Michigan’s water table for corporate profit. There are no property lines in the water table, and many of us depend on private wells for abundant, safe, clean water. In the subsequent election, Dan’s opponents ran a negative campaign almost solely on the misrepresentation that Dan’s good deed was a government takeover of your private water well...

Political Definitions As the time to vote draws near it’s a good time to check into what you stand for. According to Dictionary.com the meanings for liberal and conservative are as follows:

Liberal: Favorable to progress or reform as in political or religious affairs.

Conservative: Disposed to preserve existing conditions, institutions, etc., or to restore traditions and limit change...

Voting Takes A Month? Hurricane Matthew hit the Florida coast Oct. 6, over three weeks before Election Day. Bob Ross (Oct. 17th issue) posits that perhaps evacuation orders from Governor Scott may have had political motivations to diminish turnout and seems to praise Hillary Clinton’s call for Gov. Scott to extend Florida’s voter registration deadline due to evacuations...

Clinton Foundation Facts Does the Clinton Foundation really spend a mere 10 percent (per Mike Pence) or 20 percent (per Reince Priebus) of its money on charity? Not true. Charity Watch gives it an A rating (the same as it gives the NRA Foundation) and says it spends 88 percent on charitable causes, and 12 percent on overhead. Here is the source of the misunderstanding: The Foundation does give only a small percentage of its money to charitable organizations, but it spends far more money directly running a number of programs...

America Needs Change Trump supports our constitution, will appoint judges that will keep our freedoms safe. He supports the partial-birth ban; Hillary voted against it. Regardless of how you feel about Trump, critical issues are at stake. Trump will increase national security, monitor refugee admissions, endorse our vital military forces while fighting ISIS. Vice-presidential candidate Mike Pence will be an intelligent asset for the country. Hillary wants open borders, increased government regulation, and more demilitarization at a time when we need strong military defenses...

My Process For No I will be voting “no” on Prop 3 because I am supportive of the process that is in place to review and approve developments. I was on the Traverse City Planning Commission in the 1990s and gained an appreciation for all of the work that goes into a review. The staff reviews the project and makes a recommendation. The developer then makes a presentation, and fellow commissioners and the public can ask questions and make comments. By the end of the process, I knew how to vote for a project, up or down. This process then repeats itself at the City Commission...

Regarding Your Postcard If you received a “Vote No” postcard from StandUp TC, don’t believe their lies. Prop 3 is not illegal. It won’t cost city taxpayers thousands of dollars in legal bills or special elections. Prop 3 is about protecting our downtown -- not Munson, NMC or the Commons -- from a future of ugly skyscrapers that will diminish the very character of our downtown...

Vote Yes It has been suggested that a recall or re-election of current city staff and Traverse City Commission would work better than Prop 3. I disagree. A recall campaign is the most divisive, costly type of election possible. Prop 3, when passed, will allow all city residents an opportunity to vote on any proposed development over 60 feet tall at no cost to the taxpayer...

Yes Vote Explained A “yes” vote on Prop 3 will give Traverse City the right to vote on developments over 60 feet high. It doesn’t require votes on every future building, as incorrectly stated by a previous letter writer. If referendums are held during general elections, taxpayers pay nothing...

Beware Trump When the country you love have have served for 33 years is threatened, you have an obligation and a duty to speak out. Now is the time for all Americans to speak out against a possible Donald Trump presidency. During the past year Trump has been exposed as a pathological liar, a demagogue and a person who is totally unfit to assume the presidency of our already great country...

Picture Worth 1,000 Words Nobody disagrees with the need for affordable housing or that a certain level of density is dollar smart for TC. The issue is the proposed solution. If you haven’t already seen the architect’s rendition for the site, please Google “Pine Street Development Traverse City”...

Living Wage, Not Tall Buildings Our community deserves better than the StandUp TC “vote no” arguments. They are not truthful. Their yard signs say: “More Housing. Less Red Tape. Vote like you want your kids to live here.” The truth: More housing, but for whom? At what price..

Home · Articles · News · Features · Robot Revolution: Paul Grayson...
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Robot Revolution: Paul Grayson is Taking the Challenge to Build a Robot Car for the Defense Department

Michael E. Marotta - June 3rd, 2004
If a convoy of robot vehicles could deliver supplies to combat troops in the field, then there would be no drivers to be kidnapped and killed. Robot scout cars could provide advance intelligence. The same technology could run farm machines to plant and harvest crops. Applying intelligent systems to the cars we now drive, traffic accidents could become rare.
These are some of the motives that brought Traverse City resident Paul Grayson to a U.S. Defense Department “grand challenge” contest that offers $2 million in prizes. “The ideal world is one with no war,” he says. “Second best is a world in which war is so abstract that it takes no lives and where all military technologies have peaceful applications.”

Grayson moved his family to Traverse City in 1984 when he joined the Naval Reserves and enrolled in the Maritime Academy here to study engineering. Licensed to operate shipboard power plants, his duties typically included electrical generators in the 100- megawatt range, about three times the output of the TCLP plant on Bay Shore Drive. Now a technician with Grand Traverse Resort, he is responsible for their off-road vehicles and agricultural machinery.
The 54-year old Grayson served in the regular U.S. Navy from 1969 to 1975, and graduated from the Navy Engineering School in Bainbridge, Maryland. After leaving the Navy, he owned a retail store in Columbus, Indiana, selling artist’s materials and drafting supplies.
It was here in Traverse City, however, that his interest in robotics led him to write a column for PCAI, a professional journal about artificial intelligence for personal computers. “I got a letter from a reader of PCAI around October 2002, telling me about the DARPA Grand Challenge that was coming up in March 2004, and I was surprised, then interested, and then captivated by the opportunity,” Grayson explains.

DARPA is the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, founded in 1958. In the 1960s, DARPA built the Internet. More recently, they have been responsible for unmanned aircraft (Global Hawk and Predator) for surveillance, reconnaissance and precision bombing. Those planes are actually guided by human operators far from the action using computer screens and hand controls familiar to video gamers.
The ground vehicle “grand challenge” represents a steep step up the ladder of technology.
“The old time government contractors that have been getting money for 18 years just have not produced one.” Grayson points out. “The Department of Defense decided to invite people like me -- wildcards, basically -- to come up with our own funding to provide a robot. They are hoping for free enterprise to provide a solution. The government is attempting to create now the same environment that existed in aviation in the 1930s when World War II fighter planes and bombers were possible because of the Cleveland Air Races of the 1920s and 1930s in which people like Howard Hughes created the fastest, most powerful airplanes possible, solving hundreds of engineering problems.”
DARPA held their first Grand Challenge autonomous vehicle “field test” on March 13, 2004. (DARPA officially declined to call it a “race.”) Only one robot car got more than seven miles into the 142-mile race before encountering a problem it could not solve. According to DARPA: “Vehicle 22 - Red Team - At mile 7.4, on switchbacks in a mountainous section, vehicle went off course, got caught on a berm and rubber on the front wheels caught fire, which was quickly extinguished. Vehicle was command-disabled. None of the 14 other vehicles was so successful.“

The next field test is scheduled for March 2005. Between now and then, there will be another desert race, this one sponsored by the International Robot Racing Federation. That race will be held in September outside Las Vegas. Grayson intends to be ready for it. “We at American Industrial Magic now have 60 team members on the roster. We need local hands-on people to assemble the vehicle,” he says. “Six people, working three hours a night, seven days a week can do this by the deadline. We are looking for ordinary people. You don’t have to be an expert to be on the team. You just have to be committed to moving the project forward.”
Funding for the multi-million dollar effort is coming from several sources. Chief among these is advertising in exchange for support.
“We are in the same business as the Indy cars. A racecar company is an advertising company. That is how you pay your bills,” says Grayson. He has gotten support from both national corporations, such as Hewlett-Packard, as well as Grand Traverse businesses, including Brown Lumber and the local sales office of Fitzpatrick Electric. The driver of a team racecar is the one in the cool jumpsuit sporting corporate logos. A robot car has no driver, of course, so the pit crew will be the ones decked out.
The pit crew will take the self-guided dune buggy to automobile races and community fairs where the vehicle will demonstrate its abilities. Grayson’s plans include a “whip and chair” routine similar to a lion tamer’s act. The robot car has a collision-avoidance system. If you enter the car’s sensory field, it retreats. If you back up, it moves forward. The autonomous vehicle also has an integral fire-suppression system. One plan is to test this dramatically by setting the car on fire. “I am looking for people who want to do the most interesting thing they can imagine over a summer,” Grayson says. The real tests will be the IRRF open challenge race in Las Vegas, and the DARPA field test next year.

According to the www.darpa.mil/grandchallenge website: “Challenge vehicles must autonomously traverse the challenge route without human interface or control of any kind. The vehicles must perform general route selection and navigation to follow the Challenge route. Vehicles must sense their environment to perceive terrain features, ground conditions, obstacles, and other Challenge vehicles. They must intelligently control their speed and direction so as to avoid or accommodate all of the above. And they must do these things quickly- overall speed will be the deciding factor and the time limit is designed to push vehicle speeds far beyond current technologies.”
Grayson and five of his co-workers from Grand Traverse Resort submitted three vehicles to DARPA for the previous race, held on March 13 of this year. They did not compete. “DARPA approved our plans and documents, and considered us among the top five entrants,” Grayson says. A peer review by other teams put them among the top seven. However, none of the vehicles could be completed in time. Now, he is assembling a new team to re-build the primary entry, dubbed the AV Andrea Morgan. This car is built on the chassis of a VW bug. Two other vehicles are also possible. The AV Sydney Bristow would start its life as an H-1 “Hummer.” The AV Wendy Darling would be built on a “deuce and a half” 2 ? ton military truck.
For the present, Grayson’s focus is on finding a suitable place to work. A pole barn with a concrete floor or a former service station would be two likely alternatives. However, he also has his eye on the future. “The demand for a self-guided agricultural vehicle is very real,” he says. “I know a farmer down in Niles with two.” His long term plan is to establish a sales and service company in the Grand Traverse region employing 50 people who will install 1,000 autopilots a year on farm vehicles.
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