Letters

Letters 08-31-2015

Inalienable Rights This is a response to the “No More State Theatre” in your August 24th edition. I think I will not be the only response to this pathetic and narrow-minded letter that seems rather out of place in the northern Michigan that I know. To think we will not be getting your 25 cents for the movie you refused to see, but more importantly we will be without your “two cents” on your thoughts of a marriage at the State Theatre...

Enthusiastically Democratic Since I was one of the approximately 160 people present at when Senator Debbie Stabenow spoke on August 14 in Charlevoix, I was surprised to read in a letter to Northern Express that there was a “rather muted” response to Debbie’s announcement that she has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president...

Not Hurting I surely think the State Theatre will survive not having the homophobic presence of Colleen Smith and her family attend any matinees. I think “Ms.” Smith might also want to make sure that any medical personnel, bank staff, grocery store staff, waiters and/or waitress, etc. are not homosexual before accepting any service or product from them...

Stay Home I did not know whether to laugh or cry when I read the letter of the extremely homophobic, “disgusted” writer. She now refuses to patronize the State Theatre because she evidently feels that its confines have been poisoned by the gay wedding ceremony held there...

Keep Away In response to Colleen Smith of Cadillac who refused to bring her family to the State Theatre because there was a gay wedding there: Keep your 25 cents and your family out of Traverse City...

Celebrating Moore And A Theatre I was 10 years old when I had the privilege to see my first film at the State Theatre. I will never forget that experience. The screen was almost the size of my bedroom I shared with my older sister. The bursting sounds made me believe I was part of the film...

Outdated Thinking This letter is in response to Colleen Smith. She made public her choice to no longer go to the State Theater due to the fact that “some homosexuals” got married there. I’m not outraged by her choice; we don’t need any more hateful, self-righteous bigots in our town. She can keep her 25 cents...

Mackinac Pipeline Must Be Shut Down Crude oil flowing through Enbridge’s 60-yearold pipeline beneath the Mackinac Straits and the largest collection of fresh water on the planet should be a serious concern for every resident of the USA and Canada. Enbridge has a very “accident” prone track record...

Your Rights To Colleen, who wrote about the State Theatre: Let me thank you for sharing your views; I think most of us are well in support of the first amendment, because as you know- it gives everyone the opportunity to express their opinions. I also wanted to thank Northern Express for not shutting down these types of letters right at the source but rather giving the community a platform for education...

No Role Model [Fascinating Person from last week’s issue] Jada quoted: “I want to be a role model for girls who are interested in being in the outdoors.” I enjoy being in the outdoors, but I don’t want to kill animals for trophy...

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A Ride On The Pine is Always Fine

Swift-flowing river offers a wild ride in Manistee County

Mike Terrell - August 13th, 2012  

Like a favorite old song that always conjures up good memories, the Pine River in Manistee County falls into that category for me.

The clear, cold waters tumble through deep forests underneath high banks supporting towering pine and hardwood trees. You can go miles without seeing any cottages. The Pine’s pristine condition, coupled with its swift current – one of the fastest flowing rivers in the Lower Peninsula – long ago made it one the state’s most popular paddling rivers; sometimes too popular.

Much of the river flows through national forest, and in 1978 the National Forest Service implemented a watercraft permit system on the river that flows through its borders. Prior to the permit system they would typically count over 2,000 canoes – this was before kayak popularity grew – per week during the height of the summer season. Misuse and overuse was taking a toll on the river’s health and natural beauty. The river has stabilized in the last 34 years and is in good shape today thanks to that decisive action.

PERMITS REQUIRED

Between May 15 and September 10, all watercraft paddling the river between Elm Flats and Low Bridge must display a permit. Permits are available at the six liveries that service the Pine as well as the USFS offices in Baldwin, Manistee and Cadillac. And, they do patrol to check for permits along the river throughout the summer. Plan ahead, because they frequently run out of permits, especially on weekends. You can reserve permits ahead, and you also need a parking permit or a Senior Pass when parking on forest service land. The most popular sections of river are those flowing through the national forest.

My favorite section, from Dobson Bridge down to Low Bridge Landing, is the feistiest portion of the river. It’s about a 13-mile, five-hour paddle. From Dobson on down below Peterson Bridge – another takeout – the river runs fast with lots of light rapids and scattered bushel sized and even larger rocks that require some quick maneuvering. Bedrock ledges create small standing waves that are fun to shoot through. A few may break over your bough. I’ve had more than few lapfuls of cold river water dumped in my lap.

From Peterson on down to Low Bridge, streamside cottages almost disappear and high banks line much of the river. Hardwoods and pine predominate. The narrow chutes created by the bedrock ledges become more numerous. Coupled with occasional large boulders in the middle of the stream it will keep you on your paddling toes. This section is also great for spotting hawks and eagles soaring overhead. Eagles also will often be perched high in trees along the river searching the waters for a quick snack.

PETOSKEY STONES

I’ve also encountered kayakers and canoeists along this section, walking the banks and looking for Petoskey stones. Apparently after heavy rain and high water, it’s a great place to find them, according to people I’ve talked with. Some will make a day out of it.

The Pine is not recommended for beginners. Jerry Dennis, in his book “Canoeing Michigan Rivers” says, “I wouldn’t recommend it for anyone without at least basic paddling skills, but beginners often float it and often come away telling stories that serve to enhance the Pine’s reputation for being a difficult river. The potential for disasters certainly exists for careless or inexperienced paddlers.”

For those that want the experience of paddling the Pine on a little more relaxed stretch of river, try floating the section from the put-in at the end of Five Mile Road in Lake County down to the DNR access site just below Walker Bridge. It flows through state land and no permit is required for this section. The river is not quite as fast and the rapids more relaxed. It’s a beautiful section with small stream quality. The river is often only about 25 to 30 feet across. You still need some basic paddling skills.

This link provides livery information for Michigan rivers.

http://www.canoeingmichiganrivers.com/1/149/lower_peninsula_liveries.asp

 
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